Tourism, Environment & Sustainable Development

Tourism, Environment, and Sustainable Development

The Tourism, Environment, and Sustainable Development cluster merges a diversity of expertise to better understand the impacts of change and development, to prepare for new challenges and opportunities in tourism and economic development, and to produce innovative plans for ensuring sustainability and resiliency through stewardship and entrepreneurship. Through applied, problem-based, and community engaged learning opportunities, students in this cluster will become thoroughly prepared to solve these 21st century challenges while protecting the vast natural and cultural richness that is the essence of New England.

Real-World Cluster Project

Migration Studies and Cultural Impact of the Bicknell’s Thrush

Faculty from a variety of disciplines, students, and external partners worked to increase awareness and to conserve habitats for the Bicknell’s Thrush.

The Problem

Greater awareness and conservation action is needed to protect the Bicknell’s thrush, a threatened migratory songbird, and its habitat.

Awareness of the Issue

The birds migrate between New Hampshire’s high peaks and the declining forests of the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Perspectives from all three cultures were considered.

Collaborative Team Projects

Students in the Tourism, Environment & Sustainable Development; Exploration & Discovery; and the Health & Human Enrichment clusters teamed up to increase awareness.

Proposal Presentations

Research and findings were shared through habitat exploration, graduate course work, a film screening, an international writing workshop, and a multimedia museum exhibit.

Improved Outcomes

Public programs raised awareness of the bird’s presence and the state of its habitats.

Undergraduate Degree ProgramsGraduate Degree ProgramsMinorsCluster Projects

APPLIED LINGUISTICS

FRENCH

GEOGRAPHY

GLOBAL HEALTH

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND HERITAGE STUDIES

SUSTAINABILITY

TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL)

Anthropology/Sociology

Anthropology/Sociology Minor

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
AN 2210 Cultural Anthropology (GACO) 3
SO 2220 Foundations of Sociology (DICO) 3
AN/SO 3000/4000 level Anthropology or Sociology courses 9

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Applied Linguistics

Applied Linguistics Minor

15-16 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
LL 2000 Introduction to Language and Linguistics (QRCO) 3
LLDI 2950 Language Acquisition (SIDI) 3
LL 3500 Research in Applied Linguistics 3
Complete two of the following; one course must be taken at the 4000 level: 6 or 7
  LLDI 2020 Queer Language, Culture, and Identity (DICO) (SSDI)
  LLDI 2450 Creating Language (CTDI)
  LLDI 2500 The History of the English Language (PPDI)
  LL 4100 TESOL Methods and Practice
  LL 4300 Literacy in Language Learning

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

French

French Minor

15-17 credits

Students who transfer to Plymouth State University and who wish to minor in French must take at least one three-credit 3000/4000 level course in French at Plymouth to be granted a French minor.
 

Requirements

Credits

 
FR 3030 Advanced French (GACO) (TECO) 3
Complete one of the following: 3
  FR 3020 French Culture and Conversation
  FR 3130 Advanced French Composition (WRCO)
FR French electives 9-11

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems Minor

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
GE 2090 Computer Mapping (TECO) 3
GE 3270 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 3
Complete one of the following: 3
  GE 2001 Physical Geography
  GE 2002 Human Geography
Complete six credits from the following, with a minimum of one course in Geography: 6
  CS 2010 Computing Fundamentals (TECO)
  CS 2080 Visual Basic
  CS 2370 Introduction to Programming
  GE 3350 Introduction to Airphoto Interpretation and Remote Sensing
  GE 4140 Topics in Geographic Techniques
  GE 4270 Advanced Geographic Information Systems
  GE 4280 GIS Applications: Computer Mapping

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Geography

Geography Minor

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
Complete one of the following: 3
  GEDI 1200 Environmental Geography (SIDI)
  GE 2001 Physical Geography
Complete one of the following: 3
  GEDI 1300 Spatial Organization of Everyday Life (SSDI)
  GEDI 1400 Globalization and Diversity (PPDI)
  GE 2002 Human Geography
GE 3000/4000 level Geography courses 9
 
The prerequisites for the courses in this minor can be found in the course descriptions outline in this Catalog.

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Global Tourism

Global Tourism Minor

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
TMP 2750 Introduction to Travel and Tourism (GACO) 3
Complete one of the following: 3
  GEDI 1300 Spatial Organization of Everyday Life (SSDI)
  GEDI 1400 Globalization and Diversity (PPDI)
  GE 2002 Human Geography
Complete one of the following: 3
  TMP 3000 Topics in Hospitality and Tourism Management
  TMP 3750 Tourism Marketing Analysis
Complete two of the following: 6
  AN 3050 Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean
  AN 3190 Anthropology of the Pacific
  AN 3220 Anthropology of Europe
  AN 3900 Applied Anthropology
  GE 4110 Topics in Regional Geography (GACO) (WRCO)

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
Spanish Language 3  
SR Spanish Language course
SR Spanish Language course
Complete two semester-long SP courses at the level of SP 1110 or above
Content Courses 12
  AN 3040 Mexican Prehistory
  AN 3050 Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean
  IS 4370 Hispanic Culture in the United States
  LLDI 2200 Modern Latin American Literature in Translation
  PO 3300 Latin American Politics
  SP 3140 Spanish American Culture and Civilization
  SP 3250 Ibero-American Women in Literature, Art and Film
  SP 4400 Survey of the Literary Masterpieces of Spanish America I
Northern New England Heritage Studies
 

Northern New England Heritage Studies

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

Complete 15 credits from the following courses: 15
  AN 3110 Environmental Anthropology: Culture, Ecology, & Conservation
  AN 3260 Historical Archaeology
  AN 3410 Natives of North America
  BI 3240 Conservation
  ENDI 1550 Wilderness Literature
  HI 3150 American Civil War and Reconstruction
  HI 3335 New Hampshire and New England Historical Sites
  HI 3340 New Hampshire and New England History
  LL 2150 Introduction to Canadian Studies
  PO 3100 American Political Thought
  SO 3390 Environment and Society
  SS 3620 Archaeological Field Methods: Prehistory
  SS 3630 Archaeological Field Methods: Historical
  SS 3640 Archaeological Field Methods: Nautical

A maximum of six credits may be in 1000/2000 level courses and at least nine credits must be in 3000/4000 level courses.

Note 1: Students with a minor must complete six credits of upper-level courses outside the major discipline.
Note 2: For a second or subsequent minor, at least nine credits must be different from the major or the first minor.

Pacific Rim

Pacific Rim Minor

15 credits

In the previous two centuries, major world politics and trade centered on the Atlantic and the interaction between North America and Europe. At the start of the 21st Century, we have seen a significant shift in emphasis toward the Pacific Rim. This minor provides a solid foundation for students of any major, to prepare for the growing importance of this region. The Pacific Rim minor is interdisciplinary. Students select four classes from among a group of Anthropology, Geography, History, and Political Science courses. Additionally, students will complete one class from Asian Art, Philosophy or Culture.
 

Requirements

Credits

 
Complete four of the following: 12
  AN 3190 Anthropology of the Pacific
  HI 3730 Modern History of East Asia (GACO)
  HI 3742 History of Japan (GACO) (WRCO)
  HI 3750 History of Modern China (GACO)
  HI 3760 History of Southeast Asia (GACO)
  PO 3240 International Political Economy
  PO 3300 Latin American Politics (GACO) (WRCO)
  PO 3580 Politics of the Pacific Rim – ASEAN (WRCO)
  SO 3160 Women in World Development
Complete one of the following: 3
  AH 3530 Arts of the Far East (GACO) (INCO)
  HI 2710 History of Asian Cultures
 
For further information, see Professor Peng-Khuan Chong, the director of this program.

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Political Science

Political Science Minor

15 credits

 
 

Requirements

Credits

 
The Political Science minor requires a minimum of 15 credits in Political Science, of which at least nine must be at the 3000/4000 level.

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Spanish

Spanish Minor

17-18 credits

Students who transfer to Plymouth State University and who wish to minor in a language must take at least one three-credit 3000/4000 level course in Spanish at Plymouth to be granted a Spanish minor.
 

Requirements

Credits

 
SP 3030 Advanced Spanish (GACO) (TECO) 3
SP 3220 Advanced Spanish Composition (WRCO) 3
SP 3330 Spanish Conversation, Phonetics, and Phonology 3
SP Spanish electives 8-9

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Sustainability

Sustainability perspectives and practices are emerging as essential tools in the 21st century at local, national, and global scales. To prepare graduates from all fields to create and work in a more sustainable world, this interdisciplinary minor allows all students the opportunity to develop a solid mastery of the fundamental com- ponents of sustainability and its applications across multiple disci- plines. Students are provided opportunities through course selection and capstone experiences to develop a focus that compliments the content of their major curriculum and provides them with skills to directly apply to their future professional and personal practices.

The program allows for student choice while maintaining a focus that ensures all students learn core sustainability concepts. Within the minor all students must take the Issues in Sustainability and the Capstone courses, and no more than six credits in the minor can be double counted with a student’s major. Four of the six classes taken in the minor must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. Students interested in the minor are encouraged to contact a member of the Sustainability Council for assistance in planning their studies.

   
Corequisite: an approved Teacher Certification program
 

Requirements

Credits

 
ISDI 2100

Issues in Sustainability (SSDI)

3
ISDI 4460

Sustainability Capstone (INCO)

3
 

Environmental Systems—complete two of the following courses:

6-8
BI 2070 Botany  
BI 3240 Conservation (DICO)(GACO)(INCO)*  
BI 4050 Ecology*  
BI 4800 Current Environmental Issues*  
CH 3600 Environmental Chemistry (INCO)  
EPL 3150 Introduction to Permaculture  
ES 2400 Environmental Science  
ES 2700 Earth Systems Science: The Hazardous Earth  
GEDI 1200 Environmental Geography (SIDI)  
MTDI 1200 Weather and Climate  
MT 2800 Climatology (GACO)*  
MT 4440 Climate Change (INCO)*  
 

Social and Economic Systems—complete two
of the following courses:

 6
AR 3570 The Art of Sustainability (INCO)*  
BU 3220 Business and the Environment  
EPL 3100 Environmental Planning  
EPL 3270 Sustainability in Residences  
ESP 3270 Sustainable Structures  
PY 3310 Environmental Ethics (INCO)(WECO)  
PY 3330 Business Ethics (DICO)(INCO)  
PY 3610 Philosophy of Technology (INCO)  
SO 3600 Sustainability in Practice (WECO)  
     
*course has prerequisites  

Four of the required six courses must be taken at the 3000/4000 level.
No more than six credits may double count with the student’s major.

 
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Minor

19-27 credits

Corequisite: an approved Teacher Certification program
 

Requirements

Credits

 
LL 2000 Introduction to Language and Linguistics (QRCO) 3
LLDI 2950 Language Acquisition (SIDI) 3
LL 3300 Foundations of Multilingual Multicultural Studies (DICO) 3
LL 4100 TESOL Methods and Practice 4
LL 4300 Literacy in Language Learning 3
LL 4820 Language Assessment 3
Two semesters of one foreign language at the university level or equivalent 0-8
LL 4100 requires a 30-hour field experience.

*All course information is from the 2016-2017 Catalog.

Anthropologist Film Screening

This project is designed to expose PSU students, faculty, staff, and community members to interdisciplinary research on one of the most pressing 21st century challenges: climate change. Dr. Susan Crate is an anthropologist with a long career of conducting interdisciplinary and applied research. Her work is showcased in the film The Anthropologist, which documents her efforts to understand how marginalized communities adapt to changing environmental conditions. This project will bring Dr. Crate to campus and we will hold a public film screening followed by a Q+A session. Students from all majors will be able to attend the public film screening with Dr. Crate, gaining knowledge on climate change and social science researcher’s work documenting its impact on marginalized communities.

Visiting the Bicknell's Thrush at Cannon Mtn.

The focus of this field trip proposal is to give three groups an opportunity to visit the breeding habitat of the Bicknell’s Thrush at Cannon Mountain, where the birds are known to breed during the summer months. NH Audubon has been monitoring the presence of the birds during the breeding season as part of Cannon Mountain’s mitigation plan for expanding operations in their acquisition of Mittersill Mountain in the last couple of years. Students helping with this survey will describe the unique ecology of the Bicknell’s Thrush, a bird that has one of the most restricted breeding and wintering ranges of any North American bird, and Explain the threats and measures being taken to conserve this bird’s population and habitat in New Hampshire.”

Forest to Forest: Bicknell's Thrush

This project involves hosting a moderated PBS movie, An Island Divided: Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Student organizations, Common Ground and the Geography Club will help co host the movie and answer any questions. Next, the management team will hold a conference on Wednesday, October 25th, at the new Merrill Place facility. The conference will be open to the public. Specific courses will be targeted and invited, including: Conservation; all sections of Issues in Sustainability, including one linked with Composition; students from Sheryl Shirley’s spring ’17 Humanitarianism course; Adam Keul and tourism majors, and key First Year Seminar courses and others.”

Conservation of the Bicknell’s Thrush Conference

The project engages students to assist with planning a conference and other activities scheduled for summer and fall of 2017. A major work responsibility is to organize the conference to be held in the fall semester. The students return in the fall to attend the conference and see the fruition of their work. The students work with the project management and marketing team and attended monthly meetings related to the project during the spring of 2017.”

Cultivating Sustainable Leaders

This project consists of 20 first year PSU students from different majors enrolled in two courses- English Composition and Issues in Sustainability- will participate in a daylong field trip to Green Mountain College, VT – a leader in sustainability initiatives, for the purposes of learning about feasible projects to implement at PSU. Participants will design, write, and present about proposed projects for PSU from ideas generated from the visit to Green Mountain College. The project goals are to inspire first year students to develop and pursue feasible, sustainable initiatives at PSU.

Exploring New England Culture Heritage

This project aims to give students a first-hand account of how New England native and historic cultures are presented to visitors by visiting and analyzing two renowned tourism destinations, The Mashantucket Pequot Museum in Ledyard, CT and the Mystic Seaport and downtown Mystic, CT. The core activity of the project will be a one-day visit to these sites, though instruction will be given beforehand and analysis completed afterwards. The trip aims to give students a broader perspective on how culture and heritage are presented through tourism. Tourism economies are vital to New England and the trip is intended to be a study of tourism alongside the practice of tourism.

Mt. Prospect Region Land Conservation

The Mt. Prospect Region Land Conservation Project integrates a graduate course in ESP 5160 Land Conservation Techniques with the Town of Holderness, NH’s Conservation Commission interest in conserving land around Mt. Prospect in Holderness. The Conservation Commission will work with students in the course to develop a Project Plan and materials for the Conservation Commission and other project partners on the goals, needs, and stewardship of the Mt. Prospect area.

Quebecois Tourism

PSU French students use their skills to develop French language materials for local businesses, organizations and tourism providers. Students in advanced French courses are involved in the year-long cluster project “Designed Experiences for Québécois Tourists Visiting the North Country.” This is a collaborative, interdisciplinary experience where French students work hand in hand with students in marketing, management, and graphic design courses to identify opportunities for northern communities who are looking to better attract, welcome and serve French-Canadian visitors.

Valuing Our Campus Trees and Community Forests

Nearly 300 colleges across America are recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation for maintaining and stewarding their trees through their “Tree Campus” program. As of 2016, no campuses in New Hampshire are recognized. Plymouth State University (PSU) would be the first college campus in New Hampshire to receive Tree Campus USA recognition. We propose leading PSU to acquiring this Tree Campus USA status and maintaining this distinction in perpetuity. Leading to the application for Tree Campus USA, Environmental Science and Policy PSU majors in the spring 2017 Capstone Course collected and analyzed data on PSU campus trees to quantify the many services our trees provide our community.

Vernal Pool

This project is divided into three phases. Phase I work began Spring ’17 and will continue into summer to capture the peak amphibian migration and vernal pool activity. Phase II began in Fall 2017 and takes advantage of fall amphibian activity. This phase is critical for student research assistant to practice the necessary skills and build knowledge base and develop outreach communication materials in preparation for the Phase III. Phase III is the largest taking place in 2018, will focus on a comprehensive effort to map vernal pool resources within the town of Plymouth and document the presence/absence of amphibian species of special concern and species of greatest conservation need as identified by the New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan.

L-TEME site at the Beebe River

The long-term environmental monitoring and education (L-TEME) site program marks the initiation of long-term ecological and hydrologic monitoring program in the Beebe River watershed, a tributary to the Pemigewasset River. The research program will track freshwater and terrestrial ecological conditions and the movement patterns and genetics of eastern brook trout before and following a major restoration endeavor to restore natural flows to five south-facing Beebe River tributaries. Students will gain highly valuable experience as field research assistants. Seasonal field positions are among the most common opportunities available to graduates of the environmental biology and ESP undergraduate programs.