Meteorology Courses

2017-18 CATALOG

MT 1000 Introduction to Weather Community
1 credit

First-semester introduction to the meteorology major that helps students transition to the college environment. Introduces (1) meteorology faculty, staff, and resources; (2) ideas for success, study skills, critical thinking, work ethic, and professionalism; and (3) careers in meteorology, including forecasting, research, and broadcasting. Round-table discussions; presentations by students and faculty. Pass/No Pass. Falls. Open to Meteorology majors only.

MTDI 1200 Weather and Climate
3 credits

Basic atmospheric physical processes are investigated in order to gain a scientific understanding of atmospheric phenomena, and explore atmospheric environmental issues such as global climate change. Topics include: structure of the atmosphere, temperature, moisture, seasons, clouds and precipitation, global circulation, midlatitude cyclones, thunderstorms, tornadoes, climate zones, and global climate change. Students who have completed MTDI 1100 cannot take this course. Falls and Springs. (SIDI)

MTDI 1500 Severe and Hazardous Weather
3 credits

Addresses various scientific inquiry skills by analyzing the world’s most extreme weather events in terms of their scientific basis and their economic, human and historical consequences. Topics include hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, cold waves, heat waves, floods, droughts, major air pollution events and others. Falls and Springs. (SIDI)

MT 2110 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences
3 credits

Fundamental description of atmospheric processes and phenomena. The global energy budget, winds, air masses, fronts, clouds, snow, rain and hail, thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes are among the topics covered. Falls.

MT 2230 Introduction to Meteorological Analysis
1 credit

An introduction to basic analytical methods used in meteorology (e.g., surface and upper-air maps and thermodynamic charts). Supportive laboratory exercises are also included. Additional course fee required. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Meteorology majors. Corequisite(s): MT 2110.

MT 2800 Climatology
3 credits

A descriptive climatology course covering the 3 main areas of climatological study: physical climatology, regional climatology and applied climatology. Topics include: physical processes responsible for climate; major climate regions and climate classifications; the effect of climate on human cultures and societies; and theories of climate change including natural and anthropogenic processes. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2110. (GACO)

MT 3230 Atmospheric Thermodynamics
3 credits

Development of the kinetic theory of gases. Treatment of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, with emphasis on atmospheric applications. Adiabatic processes, stability and the use of thermodynamics diagrams. Use of computer applications. Severe weather indices. Additional course fee required. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2110, MA 2550, and PH 2410.

MT 3300 Synoptic Meteorology I
4 credits

An introduction to the techniques used to understand synoptic-scale atmospheric processes and their application to weather analysis and forecasting. Topics include: decoding and plotting standard meteorological data; plotting and interpretation of thermodynamic diagrams and cross-section analyses; manual analyses of upper-air and surface data; survey of weather graphics products from both facsimile and Internet resources; kinematics of meteorological scalar and vector fields; introduction to basic forecasting techniques; a survey of operational forecast models. Additional course fee required. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MA 2550 (may be concurrent) and MT 2110.

MT 3710 Meteorological Instruments and Observations
4 credits

Utilization of standard meteorological instruments. Practical problems in measurements and recording systems. Data reduction and analysis. Introduction to 1 or more data analysis software packages. Experimental meteorological literature. One lecture and 1 laboratory session each week plus individual writing assignments. Additional course fee required. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2110 and MA 2550 (may be concurrent). (WRCO)

MT 4150 Air Quality
3 credits

Encompasses an extensive overview of the science of Air Quality. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, air quality meteorology and forecasting techniques, air pollution sources, sinks and effects (atmospheric, environmental), including an examination of historical and current policy issues relevant to each topic. May be taken as CH 4150. Spring of odd years.

Prerequisite(s): CH 2340, MT 2110,(MA 2490 or MA 2550); Junior status. (INCO)

MT 4262 Broadcast Meteorology
3 credits

Introduction to broadcast presentation skills and the utilization of meteorological graphics software. Examines professional broadcast meteorology certification requirements. Introduces geographical terminology for local, regional, synoptic, and global areas. Discusses evolution of broadcast meteorology and future trends. Students prepare sample weathercast segments and produce a station scientist video production on subjects satisfying guidelines provided by the American Meteorological Society. Additional course fee required. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2800 and MT 3300.

MT 4280 Synoptic Meteorology II
4 credits Intermediate weather analysis and forecasting techniques are used to understand synoptic-scale weather systems with an emphasis on structure and evolution of extratropical cyclones. Topics include: climatology of mid-latitude surface and upper-air flow regimes and extratropical cyclogenesis; life cycle of extratropical cyclones including frontal evolutions; application of hydrodynamical equations and balanced systems to weather analysis and forecasting; ageostrophic winds; jet streak circulations. Students participate in weekly forecasting exercises culminating in a quantitative precipitation forecasting exercise at the end of the semester. Additional course fee required. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 3300. Corequisite(s): MT 4320.(TECO)

MT4310 Dynamic Meteorology I
3 credits

Introduction to geophysical fluid dynamics including the development of the fundamental equations, governing atmospheric motion, basic approximations, simplified flows and physical interpretation of the corresponding theory. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MA 2560, MT 3230, and PH 2420.

MT4320 Dynamic Meteorology II
3 credits

Advanced topics in geophysical fluid dynamics including circulation theory, vorticity, planetary boundary layer, quasi-geostrophic theory and introductory numerical modeling concepts. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 4310 and MA 3540 (may be concurrent).

MT4330 Current Weather Seminar
1 credit

Discussions of daily weather maps and data from the National Meteorological Center. Technical emphasis; presentations by faculty and students. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite(s): MT 4280 (may be concurrent).

MT4360 Forecasting/Broadcast Practicum
1 credit

Provides students an opportunity to improve forecasting, computer software and communication skills while formally meeting forecast deadlines on a daily basis. Forecasts are prepared and presented for broadcast on local media outlets. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. Additional course fee required.

Prerequisite(s): MT 4262, MT 4280 (may be concurrent); permission of the instructor.

MT4400 Numerical Weather Prediction
3 credits

Acquaints students with the concepts, procedures, theory, and problems associated with numerical weather prediction through discussion and by writing computer programs to process both real and simulated data. Covers the mathematical basis for various analysis and predictive techniques and their benefits and/or limitations. Students learn about the configuration and capabilities of current operational numerical analysis and prediction models. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): CS 2400, MT 4320, permission of the instructor, and Junior status. (INCO)(TECO)

MT4410 Atmospheric Physics 
3 credits

An application of the basic laws of physics to atmospheric processes. Topics discussed include gravitational effects, properties of atmospheric gases, cloud physics, solar and terrestrial radiation, atmospheric electricity and optical and acoustic phenomena. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MA 2560, MT 3230, and PH 2420.

MT4420 Tropical Weather and Climate
3 credits

An in-depth view of various topics related to tropical weather and climate, including tropical climatology, easterly waves, tropical cyclones, monsoons, El Niño, La Niña and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and other types of tropical variability. Spring of even years.

Prerequisite(s): MT 3300, PH 2410, and Junior status. (INCO)

MT4440 Climate Change
3 credits

Overview of the methods for examining climate change. Included are time series analysis and climate proxies such as tree-ring analysis, 180/160 ratios, pollen and carbon-14 dating. Also covered are a variety of possible causal factors such as orbital variations, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, CO2 variations and El Niño. The results of paleoclimatic modeling are also discussed. May be taken as ESP 4440. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2110, (PH 2130 or PH 2410), and (MA 2490 or MA 2550); Junior status. (INCO)

MT4450 Advanced Synoptic Meteorology
3 credits

Use of advanced analysis techniques for multiscale weather systems throughout the globe with an emphasis on synoptic-scale mid-latitude weather. Topics include: forecasting applications of the quasi-geostrophic height tendency and omega equations; frontogenesis; Q-vector analysis; isentropic analysis; Hovmoller diagrams, potential vorticity concepts and the use of dynamic tropopause maps. Weekly weather discussions and forecasting exercises focus on these advanced techniques and areas of current or future applied research topics. Recent articles in the scientific literature are reviewed and used throughout the course. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MT 4280 and MT 4320.

MT4460 Climate Dynamics
3 credits

Introduction to the mean thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and connections to transient weather phenomena, including zonal and eddy flow interactions, energy and momentum flux, troposphere-stratosphere interactions, and subseasonal-to-interannual atmospheric interactions with the cryosphere, hydrosphere, and pedosphere. Falls.

Prerequisite(s): MA 3500 and (MT 4320 or concurrent registration).

MT4480 Mesoscale Meteorology
3 credits

Focuses on the detailed descriptive aspects of mesoscale phenomena and processes with an emphasis on the structure. Defines what is meant by the term “mesoscale” and to what kinds of systems it applies. Deals with internally generated mesoscale circulations. Examines various mesoscale convective systems. Discusses externally forces mesoscale systems. Using observational cases, covers terminology, characteristics, and behavior of mesoscale events. Springs.

Prerequisite(s): MT 4320 (may be concurrent).

MT4500 Undergraduate Research
1-4 credits

Guided research in atmospheric sciences under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.

Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.

MT4560 Topics in Meteorology
1-4 credits

Covers material related to a major subdiscipline in Meteorology that is not covered in the regular curriculum. May be repeated with a different topic so that students can receive exposure to a variety of subject areas.

Prerequisite(s): Meteorology major and permission of the instructor.

MT4600 Internship
1-4 credits

Involves 1-4 weeks of full-time work or equivalent part-time work at a private or governmental forecast office, weather observatory or broadcasting facility. The on-site experience is provided to give students an opportunity to become more familiar with meteorological equipment and forecasting procedures and to participate in daily weather observations, discussions, and presentations as appropriate. Compensation is not necessarily provided for intern time. One credit is given for each 40-hour week of participation. Studies must submit a written report when the internship is completed. Repeatable for credit.

Prerequisite(s): MT 2110 and permission of the instructor.

MT4910 Independent Study
1-4 credits

Ordinarily for Meteorology majors. Studies undertaken are defined by students, subject to approval by appropriate staff members. Work may involve reading, conferences, historical, experimental or theoretical projects, field investigations, statistical surveys or combinations of the foregoing. Consent required of the instructor who will supervise the independent study and the Department Chair.

MT 5150 Air Quality
3 credits

Encompasses an extensive overview of the science of air quality. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, air quality meteorology and forecasting techniques, air pollution sources, sinks and effects (atmospheric, environmental), including an examination of historical and current policy issues relevant to each topic. Spring term of even years. Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4150 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5200 Transportation Meteorology
3 credits

Students will learn the various weather systems that affect different modes of transportation. In particular, road weather, aviation meteorology, and oceanic meteorology will be highlighted. Advanced weather analysis and forecasting skills will be applied in order to make forecasts tailored to various industries. Spring term. Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science and any computer programming course or permission of the instructor.

MT 5280 Synoptic Meteorology II
3 credits

Intermediate weather analysis and forecasting techniques are used to understand synoptic-scale weather systems with an emphasis on structure and evolution of extratropical cyclones. Topics include: climatology of mid-latitude surface and upper-air flow regimes and extratropical cyclogenesis; life cycle of extratropical cyclones including frontal evolutions; application of hydrodynamical equations and balanced systems to weather analysis and forecasting; ageostrophic winds; jet streak circulations. Students participate in weekly forecasting exercises culminating in a quantitative precipitation forecasting exercise at the end of the semester. Additional course fee required. Spring term.

Co-requisite: MT 5320/4320 or equivalent. This course is co-listed as MT 4280 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5310 Dynamic Meteorology I
3 credits This course is an introduction to geophysical fluid dynamics including the development of the fundamental equations governing atmospheric motion, basic approximations, simplified flows, and physical interpretation of the corresponding theory. Fall term. This course is co-listed with MT 4310 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5320 Dynamic Meteorology II
3 credits

This course will cover advanced topics in geophysical fluid dynamics including circulation theory, vorticity, planetary boundary layer, quasi-geostrophic theory, stratospheric dynamics and introductory numerical modeling concepts. Spring term.

Prerequisite: MT 5310/4310. This course is co-listed as MT4320 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5330 Satellite Meteorology
3 credits

This course will provide the student with a broad overview of the theory and application of satellite data. Course begins with a short history of meteorological satellites. This will be followed by sections on satellite orbits and navigation, and types of currently operating satellites. Later sections discuss radiative transfer theory, meteorological sensor packages and types of data, image interpretation, wind measurements, and atmospheric soundings. Fall term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor.

MT 5340 Radar Meteorology
3 credits

This course will provide a broad overview of the hardware and theory behind the application of meteorological radar data. The course will begin with a short history of radar meteorology, which will be followed by a brief summary of the radar hardware and theory applicable to meteorological use and interpretation—beam spreading, ducting, anomalous propagation, etc. The differences between reflectivity, Doppler, and polarimetric measurements will also be discussed. Much of the remainder of the course will be used to cover the different levels of Doppler radar data, the available products for each level, algorithms used to automatically analyze these data, and applying these data to real world problems, such as quantitative precipitation estimates and severe local storms detection. Spring term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor.

MT 5350 Boundary Layer Meteorology
3 credits

This course is designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) behavior, where the atmosphere is highly influenced by the Earth’s surface. The student will develop an appreciation for the role of the ABL in the overall dynamics of the atmosphere. Specifically, students will come to understand the importance of fluxes in the ABL, the general diurnal structure of the ABL, the principles of turbulent flow, including Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the application of Reynolds averaging, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation. Fall term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor.

 

MT 5400 Numerical Weather Prediction
3 credits

Acquaints students with the concepts, procedures, theory, and problems associated with numerical weather prediction through discussion and by writing computer programs to process both real and simulated data. Covers the mathematical basis for various analysis and predictive techniques and their benefits and/or limitations. Students learn about the configuration and capabilities of current operational numerical analysis and prediction models. Fall term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science, any computer programming course, or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4400 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5410 Atmospheric Physics 
3 credits

This course will provide an application of the basic laws of physics to atmospheric processes. Topics discussed include gravitational effects, properties of atmospheric gases, cloud physics, solar and terrestrial radiation, atmospheric electricity, and optical and acoustical phenomena. Fall term. This course is co-listed as MT 4410 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5420 Tropical Weather and Climate
3 credits

An in-depth view of various topics related to tropical weather and climate, including tropical climatology, easterly waves, tropical cyclones, monsoons, El Nino, La Nina and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and other types of tropical variability. Spring term of odd years.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4420 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5430 Climate Change
3 credits

This course will provide an overview of the methods for examining climate change. Included are time series analysis and climate proxies, such as tree-ring analysis, oxygen-18/oxygen-16 ratios, and pollen and carbon-14 dating. Also covered are a variety of possible causal factors such as orbital variations, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, CO2 variations, and El Niño. The results of paleoclimatic modeling are also discussed. Spring term of odd years. This course is co-listed as MT 4430 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5450 Advanced Synoptic Meteorology
3 credits

Use of advanced analytical techniques for multiscale weather systems throughout the globe with an emphasis on synoptic-scale, mid-latitude weather will be discussed. Topics include forecasting applications of the quasi-geostrophic height tendency and omega equations, frontogenesis, Q-vector analysis, isentropic analysis, Hovmoller diagrams, potential vorticity concepts, and the use of dynamic tropopause maps. Weekly weather discussions and forecasting exercises focus on these advanced techniques and areas of current or future applied research topics. Recent articles in the scientific literature are reviewed and used throughout the course. Fall term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4450 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5470 Micrometeorology
3 credits

Students will study the processes involving the exchange of momentum, heat, and moisture between the lowest portion of the atmosphere and the underlying surface of the Earth. Topics will include local energy budgets, soil heat transfer, the planetary boundary layer, turbulence, and neutral and diabatic surface layers. Spring term of even years.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4470 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5480 Mesoscale Meteorology
3 credits

Focuses on the detailed descriptive aspects of mesoscale phenomena and processes with an emphasis on the structure. Defines what is meant by the term ‘mesoscale’ and to what kinds of systems it applies. Deals with internally generated mesoscale circulations. Examines various mesoscale convective systems. Discusses external force mesoscale systems. Using observational cases, covers terminology, characteristics, and behavior of mesoscale events. Spring Term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science or permission of the instructor. This course is co-listed as MT 4480 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5560 Topics in Meteorology
1-3 credits

Covers material related to a major subdiscipline in Meteorology that is not covered in the regular curriculum. May be repeated with a different topic so that students can receive exposure to a variety of subject areas.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. These may or may not be co-listed as MT 4550 in the undergraduate curriculum.

MT 5600 Computer Applications in Meteorology
3 credits

This course is designed as an intense introduction to the technological tools and techniques used by professional meteorologists in the analysis and display of meteorological and environmental data. Students will learn programming methodology and become proficient in the use of a number of open source and commercial software packages. Fall term.

Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in Meteorology or Atmospheric Science and any computer programming course or permission of the instructor.

MT 5700 Graduate Seminar Meteorology
1 credit

Provides graduate students with a forum to publicly present and discuss their results from literature reviews, case studies, or research. Interdisciplinary topics will also be presented. This is a required course for all MS in Applied Meteorology students. This course can be repeated for credit three times for a total of three credits. Fall and spring terms. Pass/No Pass.

MT 5800 Thesis Research
1–6 credits

Students will develop and present a thesis research proposal, conduct detailed research, write a thesis, and defend the research before a faculty committee. Signature of the faculty supervisor and the meteorology program coordinator is required. All terms. Pass/No Pass.

MT 5910 Independent Study/Research
1–3 credits

Studies undertaken will be defined by students and subject to approval by appropriate staff members. Work may involve reading; conferences; historical, experimental, or theoretical projects; field investigation; statistical surveys; combinations of the foregoing; or other activities deemed appropriate. Students may work in a physical or biological science or in interdisciplinary areas. Students may not be granted more than three credits. Consent of a faculty supervisor, department chair, and the associate vice president for academic affairs is required. All terms.