2009 Research Conference Program

April 29th, 2010 by Bridget

2nd Annual Undergraduate Research and Outreach Conference

Monday, August 10, 2009 at the Pierce Lab, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.
10am: Opening remarks and introductions
10:15: Student presentations of Science Communication projects:

  • Student/team
    Tyler Refsland
    Partner organization

    Margaret and H.A. Rey Center
    I helped create a data collection sheet that Plymouth High School students will use as they conduct phenological research on Mt. Tecumseh. This data sheet will not only provide the students with an organized way to record their data and observations on the plant community of the mountain, but it will help the Rey Center better communicate the components and the importance of phenology in a changing world.
  • Student/team
    Kadeem Gilbert; Kaitlin Friedman
    Partner organization

    NH Fish and Game
    We have compiled a list of plants that would enhance Plymouth Elementary School’s (PES) habitat for neo-tropical migratory songbirds. PES has an existing grant providing funds for a landscaping project that would help neo-tropical migratory birds. PES also has a curriculum incorporating the program Bridging the Americas that educates students about neo-tropical migratory birds. We have also created materials for teachers to incorporate into this curriculum.
  • Student/team
    Cayce Salvino; Cord Dorcey
    Partner organization

    NH Lakes Association
    We created an educational video on behalf of New Hampshire Lakes Association. Our desire is to inform a young audience that everyone lives within a watershed. Additionally, we want to stress the importance of protecting our natural resources for the benefit of plants, animals, and humans alike.
  • Student/team
    Maegan Gagne;
    Partner organization
    NH Dept of Environmental Services
    I’ve created a video/slideshow explaining the importance of good stream crossing design which is targeted toward municipal workers. The video compares properly constructed stream crossings with ones that are built incorrectly. The main focus of the video is to show how proper design/construction of stream crossings are necessary in order to facilitate aquatic wildlife transport and therefore insure survival. Many of the photographs used in the video are originals.
  • Student/team
    Brita Stepe
    Partner organization

    NH Dept of Environmental Services
    The significance of the impact of the “common man” (as opposed to commercial and industrial villains) on the natural systems and cycles of our local environment in New Hampshire has been regrettably ignored. One such system is the Great Bay, a fragile estuary on the border of Maine and New Hampshire which is showing severe side effects of excessive anthropogenic influx of nitrogen. It is becoming necessary to educate the public about their role in nitrogen overload in Great Bay and to incite positive action to end this pollution. I have collaborated with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services to produce an educational article for publication in local newspapers and a powerpoint presentation for the DES website.
  • Student/team
    Jordan Jessop;
    Partner organization
    PSU Center for the Environment
    I worked with Plymouth State University’s Center for the Environment to summarize a pair of graduate students’ research and experience at PSU. I interviewed and wrote up a couple of articles and summaries with photos. These will be used by the CFE for internal purposes, as well as for press releases and quotes.
  • Student/team
    Audrey Reid
    Partner organization

    PSU Center for the Environment
    Creating a Hubbard Brook REU Blog: A public view from a student’s perspective
  • Student/team
    Katie Harvey
    Partner organization

    USDA Forest Service (WMNF)
    I have created a brochure for the White Mountain National Forest on the advantages of ecological classifications in resource management. Ecological classifications are used to predict how the forest will change under manipulation (i.e. forest harvesting, road building, etc). These descriptive classifications, based on topography, geology, soils composition, and potential natural vegetation, can be used to make more informed management decisions by taking a whole ecosystem perspective.
  • Student/team
    Rhonda Martinez; Maggie Zimmer
    Partner organization

    Hubbard Brook Research Foundation
    Our project provides input and guidance in the design of a high school level teacher’s guide aimed at helping youth learn from, and connect to, the natural world. Lessons within the guide include soil and water sampling as well as chemical testing and data analysis. This guide will provide protocols for consistent testing and guidelines for interpretation specific to acid deposition impacts.

12:00: Roundtable discussion of the communications portion of the program
12:30: Lunch
1:00: Research Presentations

  • Student
    Rhonda Martinez
    Mentor Team

    Scott Bailey; Jackie Wilson
    What brooks can tell us: A comparison of streamwater and soil pH of Falls Brook.
  • Student
    Cayce Salvino
    Mentor Team

    Pam Templer; John Campbell
    An investigation of the impacts of soil frost on sugar maple trees.
  • Student
    Maggie Zimmer
    Mentor Team

    Scott Bailey; Kevin McGuire
    A trans-disciplinary perspective on groundwater-surface water interactions in Watershed 3.
  • Student
    Katie Harvey
    Mentor Team

    Bailey; Kevin McGuire
    Does near-stream soil development define a riparian zone in Watershed 3?
  • Student
    Audrey Reid
    Mentor Team

    Charley Driscoll
    Has the Clean Air Act worked? Investigating acidity in six White Mountain ponds.
  • Student
    Jordan Jessop
    Mentor Team

    Driscoll
    Investigating the impact of the Clean Air Act on ponds throughout the White Mountains.
  • Student
    Brita Stepe
    Mentor Team

    Michele Pruyn
    Yellow Birch in a forest of change.
  • Student
    Maegan Gagne
    Mentor Team

    Michele Pruyn
    Water properties of Yellow Birch along an elevation gradient on Mount Kineo in Woodstock, NH.
  • Student
    Cord Dorcey
    Mentor Team

    Pete Marra
    Reconstructing a terrestrial food web using stable Carbon and Nitrogen isotopes.
  • Student
    Kadeem Gilbert
    Mentor Team

    John Battles; Tim Fahey; Patrick Bourgeron
    Investigating the correlations that exist between moose population density and factors such as vegetation and elevation.
  • Student
    Tyler Refsland
    Mentor Team

    Ruth Yanai; Tim Fahey
    Examining how forest stand fertility affects root to shoot ratios, and to what extent allometry underestimates root and foliar biomass, especially in young stands.
  • Student
    Kaitlin Friedman (not presenting)
    Mentor Team

    Gene Likens
    Abundance and distribution of Desmognathus fuscus along a stream gradient.

4:00 Closing remarks

Contact Us

Contact Us

January 9th, 2013 by Michael

Center for the Environment

Plymouth State University
Russell House
MSC #63, 17 High Street
Plymouth, NH 03264
psu-cfe@plymouth.edu

phone (603) 535-3179
fax (603) 535-3004