2014-15 Counseling Program Assessment and Evaluation Report

Elements reviewed:

CPCE scores

CACREP Core and Specialty Standards

Survey Data from Recent Graduates, Site Supervisors, and Employers

Strengths

  • Student performance on the CPCE was consistently higher than the national mean scores for each section. Overall students who took the exam in 2014-2015 had an average z score of +.50— a half standard deviation above the national mean..
  • Students are generally successful at meeting CACREP core and specialty standards (an average of between 96%-100% per term). Part of this success may be due to the faculty offering students the opportunity to develop mastery.
    • Recommendation for improvement: Continue to offer opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate mastery of core and specialty standards.
  • Survey data from recent alumni, site supervisors, and employers support the general strength of the Counselor Education program. However, there was a lower response rate for clinical mental health site supervisors and employers when compared to response rate of these same roles within the school counseling concentration. Recommendations for improvement
    • Creation of faculty committee to review procedures and make recommendations
    • Coordinate with university alumni office for their support
    • Make a concerted effort to develop stronger and more enduring relationships with site supervisors and employers in the clinical mental health counseling field.

Area of Concern and Recommended Course of Action Related to the lowest area score as reflected in CPCE data.

Human Growth and Development: The z score for this subsection of the exam was the only one that was below the national mean for 2014-2015 (-0.043).  Faculty will continue to monitor this course. Additionally, the faculty moved some standards out of  the Advanced Human Development course that may allow for greater focus on core standard.

Areas of Concern and Recommended Course of Action Related to the measurement of core and specialty standards:

  • Core Standard 3.b – “Theories of learning and personality development, including current understandings about neurobiological behavior: The faculty realized that too much was being asked of the Advanced Human Development class (where it was currently taught and assessed), thus this standard will also be taught and assessed in the course “Theories of Counseling and Personality as well as the Advanced Human Development course.
  • Core Standard 5.g – “Crisis intervention and suicide prevention models, including the use of psychological first aid strategies.” This standard had been taught in the specialty areas (Crisis and Trauma & Critical Issues in Schools). Faculty decided to also add this standard to the Practicum course in order to get increased coverage in this important area.
  • School Counseling Standard A.7—“Understands the operation of the school emergency management plan and the roles and responsibilities of the school counselor during crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events.” The course that this standard is taught in, Critical Issues in Schools will be completely revamped prior to its next offering in Fall 2016. The possible incorporation of the nationally recognized PREPaRE training into the course will help address this deficiency.
  • School Counseling Standard C.6—“Understands the potential impact of crises, emergencies, and disasters on students, educators, and schools, and knows the skills needed for crisis intervention.” The course that this standard is taught in, Critical Issues in Schools will be completely revamped prior to its next offering in Fall 2016. The possible incorporation of the nationally recognized PREPaRE training into the course will help address this deficiency.
  • School Counseling Standard G.1—“Understands the influence of multiple factors (e.g., abuse, violence, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, childhood depression) that may affect the personal, social, and academic functioning of students.” The course that this standard is taught in, Critical Issues in Schools will be completely revamped prior to its next offering in Fall 2016.
  • School Counseling Standard M.5—“Knows strategies and methods for working with parents, guardians, families, and communities to empower them to act on behalf of their children.” The course that this standard is taught in, Critical Issues in Schools will be completely revamped prior to its next offering in Fall 2016.
  • School Counseling Standard M.7 – Knows school and community collaboration models for crisis/disaster preparedness and response.” The course that this standard is taught in, Critical Issues in Schools will be completely revamped prior to its next offering in Fall 2016. The possible incorporation of the nationally recognized PREPaRE training into the course will help address this deficiency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology

Samuel Read Hall, 3rd floor

M, W, Th, F, 9am to 5pm
Tuesdays, 8:30am to 4:30pm
Or by appointment
Phone: (603) 535-3119
Email: ggoodno@plymouth.edu
Gary Goodnough, Chair
Fax: (603) 535-2117

Mailing Address
Plymouth State University
Counselor Education and School Psychology
17 High Street, MSC 58
Plymouth, NH 03264