2013 Keynote Address

This year’s keynote speaker is David L. Simon. He is Jetté Professor of Art at Colby College, where he has
received the Basset Award for excellence in teaching. He holds graduate degrees from Boston University
and the Courtauld Institute of Art of the University of London. Among his publications are the catalogue
of Spanish and southern French Romanesque sculpture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The
Cloisters and studies on Romanesque architecture and sculpture in Aragon and Navarra, Spain. He is coauthor
of recent editions of Janson’s History of Art: The Western Tradition and Janson’s Basic History of
Western Art. Since 2007 he has co-directed an annual summer course and conference on Romanesque
art for the University of Zaragoza, Spain.

We are proud to offer the keynote address live via web streaming this year! Please click the link to hear Dr. Simon’s address, “The Anecdotal Way to Santiago de Compostela.”

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