MEd in Human Relations

The Master of Education (MEd) in Human Relations offers students advanced study in the theoretical and pragmatic nuances of human relationships. Designed for students who do not wish to obtain counseling licensure or certification, this degree program is appropriate for a variety of helping professionals including, but not limited to, teachers, administrators, clergy members, and business professionals. The program is built on foundational core courses in human development, social behavior and diversity, research design, counseling or educational theories, and a practicum field experience. One of the major benefits of the program is its flexibility. Along with the foundational core courses, students are granted 18 credits of electives, which they tailor to their individual interests. Student may choose to focus on health and healing, parenting education, and leadership.

For more information, visit the Counselor Education and School Psychology Department website.

  • Counselor Education Core Component – 12 credits
  • 3
    Focuses on a life-span approach to human development and looks at the constancy and change in behavior throughout life, from conception to death. Students will study human development in the context of a multidisciplinary approach and the larger ecological context of developmental events in human behavior. This course will have four major concerns: to identify and describe the changes that occur across the life span; to explain these changes in the context of maturation, early learning, and societal factors impacting development; to review research and theoretical frameworks that have affected our way of thinking and, to study the interdependence and interrelatedness of all aspects of development. There is a 16-hour service learning/pre-practicum field experience as part of this course.
  • 3
    Recognizing that social behavior occurs within an intercultural context, Counselor Education and School Psychology students will develop the basic knowledge foundations necessary to understand and influence social behavior in a diverse society. Texts, readings and learning modules have been chosen and/or designed to facilitate the student's ability to understand the nature of social behavior cross culturally.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    Seeks to examine the manner in which the behavior, feelings, or thoughts of one individual are influenced by the behavior or characteristics of others. Topics to be considered include social perception, attitudes, gender, social cognition, conflict, social influence, intercultural awareness, prejudice, discrimination, aggression, and group behavior. Fall, spring, and summer.
  • 3
    This course is designed to familiarize students with a variety of research principles, ethical and legal considerations, research design, methodologies of research, data analyses, and principles of program evaluation. In addition, students will be able to critically evaluate research literature, understand basics of writing a literature review, and principles outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. As a result, students will be prepared to understand available research, act on that knowledge in being discriminate evaluators of research and in being able to design research projects.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    Knowledge and understanding of the commonly accepted research designs. Study of research instruments and statistics used in educational research. Wide reading in various types of research design. Critical analysis of research design.
  • 3
    Major counseling theories and their relationship to the counseling process are explored. Individual, familial, and systemic models are presented along with dynamics and issues that reflect and cross theoretical perspectives. Students will be required to compare and contrast counseling theories and strategies, consider appropriate application of these strategies in diverse populations, and develop a personal model for providing help and facilitating behavioral change.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    An overview of current theories concerning the brain, development, and learning. Analysis of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Discussion of language acquisition, thinking and learning styles, multiple intelligence, and creativity. Topics include teaching, learning, and assessment issues related to cultural diversity, technology, and learning differences.
    • Human Relations Specialization Courses – 18 credits

With your advisor, you’ll choose specialization courses appropriate for your program of study.

  • Capstone Experience – 3 credits
  • 3
    This course is a 100-hour field-based experience that focuses on developing competency in human relations. Students will complete field experiences in approved community sites based on their interest area. In addition to the field experience, students will also participate in a weekly group seminar to discuss the application of their knowledge and skills. Prerequisites: Completion of all core courses as listed in the Human Relations program contract.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    The purpose of the graduate capstone is to apply knowledge learned in previous coursework through an approved project. Capstone projects should focus on the following questions: How will the theories learned throughout the program be integrated into a coherent project or experience? How will this work enhance individual career goals? Who are the stakeholders and how will this work assist them? How does this work serve the professional community? How will this work help move the profession forward? Process: Students should plan for approximately 40 hours of work per credit to be earned. The total number of credits earned must be approved by their advisor and noted on their program contract. Candidates must submit Graduate Capstone Project forms with their registration and Capstone Projects must be approved by candidates' advisors and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies. Once completed, candidates are expected to present their final products to their adviser and/or PSU faculty members. Students who anticipate working on their project for more than one term should register for the appropriate number of credits in each term so that they remain registered throughout the course of the project.
  • Total for MEd in Human Relations – 33 credits

Graduate Certificates

Students may also be interested in learning more about the following certificate programs:

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