Education and Instruction

Educational Materials

Educational materials available on this site relate directly to content explored through the Museum of the White Mountains’ current, past, and/or travelling panel exhibitions.  Nearly all of the museum’s exhibitions have coordinating educational materials, consisting of standards-based curriculum packets for elementary, middle, and high school classes.  All lesson plans are described below, organized by grade level.  Click on the lesson title to access the lesson plans;  click on the corresponding exhibition title to access online versions of the exhibition.  Additional exhibit-related educational tools such as downloadable exhibition catalogs and various family activities are also accessible by clicking on exhibition titles.

The use of these materials for educational purposes is free and open to the public.

Elementary School Materials

 Stories of Place: An Integrated Arts Activity

This lesson is an investigation, exploration and discussion of the unique landscape of the White Mountains and the history of the area focusing on the personal stories and discoveries of its early visitors. The students will investigate and explore the history, personal stories and visual images recorded and created by visitors to the region, as found in the online exhibit catalogue, as a catalyst for discussion of the aesthetic qualities of the landscape and region that attracted tourists to the White Mountains.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Passing Through: The Allure of the White Mountains

 

 A Photograph is Worth One Thousand Words

Guy Shorey was not only an entrepreneur and artist/photographer of the White Mountains region of New Hampshire, he was also a keen observer of the people and natural wonders of the land and times in which he lived.  He captured his observations in the photographs he took.  This lesson plan is designed to engage elementary school students in the process of observing details in Shorey’s photographs and imagining what the people are doing, thinking and feeling and how those thoughts and emotions may be the same or different from the students’.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Guy Shorey: Among the White Hills

 

 

 

Important Places: Telling the Personal Story of the Beauty of Place

This lesson is an exploration and discussion of the natural and aesthetic qualities of the landscape of the White Mountains. It uses the beauty and qualities of the landscape that attracted and inspired the White Mountain painters as a catalyst for the exploration and investigation of areas that students may view as special, inspiring and attractive to them. The lesson will make connections between subject matter of the White Mountain paintings, and the landscape qualities and resources that attracted tourists, settlers and industry.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, As Time Passes Over the Land

 

 

A Walk in the Forest: Integrated Visual Arts Activities

This activity is an exploration and discussion of the movement to save the White Mountains and its forests that resulted in the 1911 Weeks Act. It uses the history, stories, and photographs from this period as a catalyst for exploration, investigation, and discussion of the importance of forested and natural areas. It focuses on the environment and landscape of the White Mountains and why conservationists, tourists, industry, and residents found this location to be beautiful and important to save from unsustainable practices of industry.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Protecting the Forest: The Weeks Act

 

An Invitation to Explore the City that Trees Built

The following activities have been designed to teach students how to critically look at the visual images: to notice details, personally respond, ask questions and reflect about the meanings, to discover for themselves the unique culture and history of the “City that Trees Built.” Students will explore the connection between a region’s natural resources, its economic dependence on it, and how that dependence changes over time.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Beyond Brown Paper

 

 

 

 

 

Middle School Materials

Sites for Escape: An Integrated Visual Arts Activity

This lesson is an exploration and investigation of the role the White Mountains played in giving the upper and middle class an accessible location for escape, the impact increased tourism and industry had on the landscape, and the original reasons for escaping to the White Mountains. The students will explore, investigate and discuss the history of the White Mountains and the impact tourists and industry have had on it.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Passing Through: The Allure of the White Mountains

 

 

Guy Shorey, Artist/Photographer Bookmaking

This activity entails exploration and discussion of the works of Guy Shorey with the objective of understanding how he promoted the White Mountains using his photographs in books. It is expected that the teacher will lead discussions concerning Shorey’s work so that students may analyze how he was able to use his work to provide visual and verbal for his promoting the beauty and times of the White Mountains in which he lived, including the composition and contrast in his photographs.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Guy Shorey: Among the White Hills

 

 

 

 

 

Editing the Landscape: Perception of Place and Importance

This lesson is an exploration, investigation and discussion of that transformative action many White Mountain Painters undertook. It will make connections between the landscape and region of the White Mountains during the 19 th  century and the region and landscape of the students’ community and the changes and effects that industry and development have had on it. The students will discuss the ways that industry and development have changed the aesthetic qualities and perceived importance of place.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, As Time Passes Over the Land

 

Advocacy, Conservation, and Community: An Integrated Visual Arts Activity

This activity is an exploration and discussion of the power of the visual images and stories from that period. It is an investigation of the stories from those involved in the advocacy and conservation movements and the stories the visual images, specifically the photographs, tell. These images will be used to discuss what was seen at the core of reasons to save the White Mountains and its forests and the ways these images and experiences were used by all sides in this debate.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Protecting the Forest: The Weeks Act

An Invitation to Explore Berlin, the City that Trees Built

This activity has been designed to teach students how to critically look at the visual images: to notice details, personally respond, ask questions and reflect about the meanings, to discover for themselves the unique culture and history of the “City that Trees Built.” Students will explore the connection between a region’s natural resources, its economic dependence on it, and how that dependence changes over time. Students will be invited to look beyond the constraints of present time, to seek out the vital human connections that link us to our past.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Beyond Brown Paper

 

 

 

 

High School Materials

Personal Journeys: An Integrated Arts Activity

This lesson is an exploration, investigation and discussion of the early tourists who came to the White Mountains to explore uncharted areas and their stories of travel and discovery. The students will investigate the stories and imagery from these nineteenth-century individuals and the importance these difficult journeys played in their lives. Through their exploration and discussions of the early journeys into the White Mountains students will explore and investigate journeys they have undertaken or want to undertake that may lead them into uncharted areas.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Passing Through: The Allure of the White Mountains

 

Guy Shorey, Entrepreneur: Postcards from Home

Guy Shorey was not only an artist/photographer and observer of the White Mountains, he was also an entrepreneur who hoped to encourage tourists to visit and appreciate the natural wonders which he captured in his photographs.  This lesson plan is designed to engage high school students in the process of observing their surroundings, photographing the people and places of their communities and using those images to make postcards and other promotional pieces which are designed to encourage others to visit and explore.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Guy Shorey: Among the White Hills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expressing Sense of Place and Belonging

This lesson is an exploration, investigation and discussion of place and how it can be visually depicted to express one’s personal feelings of its importance. The teacher and students will investigate and discuss the evolution of the images and compositions of the White Mountain paintings and how the painters made efforts to express location of place, personal investment in place and emotional connection to place. Students will explore, investigate and discuss places they feel connected to or have a sense of belonging to.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, As Time Passes Over the Land

 

 

Advocacy, Conservation, Community, Planning, and the Environment: An Visual Arts Activity

This lesson is an exploration and discussion of the impact of unregulated and unsustainable practices of industry and development on the environment and communities. What disappears from or comes to the landscape, environment and community because of unchecked development and industrialization is at the core of this activity. The lesson centers on the conservation and advocacy movements that helped to bring the 1911 Weeks Act into being and uses it as the catalyst for exploration and discussion.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Protecting the Forest: The Weeks Act

An Invitation to Explore Berlin, the City the Trees Built

The following activities have been designed to teach students how to critically look at the visual images: to notice details, personally respond, ask questions and reflect about the meanings, to discover for themselves the unique culture and history of the “City that Trees Built.” Students will explore the connection between a region’s natural resources, its economic dependence on it, and how that dependence changes over time. Students will be invited to look beyond the constraints of present time, to seek out the vital human connections that link us to our past.

Lesson inspired by the exhibition, Beyond Brown Paper