Spam and Phishing

January 26th, 2006 by Adam

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Spam & Email Fraud (Phishing)

FROM: Dwight Fischer, CIO

TO: PSU Community

DEPT: ITS, ext. 2929

DATE: January 11, 2006

Our spam filters have done a good job in the past
year of screening some of the nastier email spam. Just remember, innovation
knows no boundaries. As soon as we have good filters for the known spam, new
ones find their way through. It’s never ending. Still, over 45% of mail
coming into the PSU mail server is blocked as spam. On average, 975 of that
same email contains viruses. You have control
over how much spam comes to your computer
. Visit oz.plymouth.edu/spamkill/ for information on how to set your filter
(high, medium or low).

 

Outlook users may also add an extra layer of protection.
When in email, see ACTIONS menu, select JUNK MAIL OPTIONS and set up a second
filter there.

 

And, as always, never open email attachments from
unknown sources
. If you have questions or concerns, please call the Help
Desk at 2929.

 

Email Fraud through Phishing

This is a practice used via email to prompt an individual
to follow an email link and update their personal and credit information. One
of the more popular scams came from eBay, which claimed your account
information was in question and that you needed to follow the link and update
your record. Once there, they prompted you to login (providing them with your
username and password) and then update your credit card information. The
emails look official and many people were duped. There are others. Lately,
there are emails come from Amazon.com
, prompting you to do the same. Here’s
the rule of thumb: Never, never ever, ever ever,
ever respond to any emails or online queries that ask you to update your
record
. No legitimate company would ever ask you to do this in email. If
you have to update your information on a web site, make sure you are in a legitimate
site. If ever there is a question, contact them by phone.

Note: If, by chance, you have responded to an inquiry like
this, it is best to contact your credit card holder right away. Ask that the
card be cancelled and a new one issued.

 

Be vigilant!

 

Dwight Phisher

 

😉