Walking with Boston’s Homeless – Student Reflections

These are reflections of some of the Plymouth State students who have gone on the Walking with Boston’s Homeless trip in the past few years.

You know that homelessness is an issue, but you can’t truly grasp how it affects someone’s life until they lead you around and show you what their life is really like.

I recommend this event to all students. This was an eye-opening experience for me. Before this event, I had learned about homeless people, but after this event I now know the experiences they go through. I want to continue to learn and work with homeless people, and hopefully in the future the lives of homeless people will be better.

The walking tour offered a realistic view of Boston’s homeless and the challenges which they face. Actually, seeing places which people must rely on was very jolting. No human should ever have to go through the brutality of living on the streets, and more people need to step up and stop this.

It was an incredible experience. The best part for me was, after realizing what homelessness was really like, being able to give a homeless person something that I knew would really help.

I walked over to a couple lying on a blanket in the middle of a park. These people were clearly in need. The woman had an aged face that told a story of hard life. The man was eating a cheeseburger. When I approached them and let them know why I was there, the woman began to cry and tell me how someone gave them that cheeseburger. A cheeseburger to share amongst two people, perhaps the only food they would have all day. This was the same kind cheeseburger that I would buy three or four of, just for myself, many times after a late-night soccer game. That for me was an “eye-opening” experience.

Completely eye-opening. Getting a tour by people who have experienced homelessness, hearing their personal stories, and seeing where it all happened really put it into perspective for me. I appreciate everything I have—family, friends, shelter, food, warmth, education, respect, and so much more.

Before going on this trip, I would have been like most people and ignored someone I assumed was homeless because I didn’t know how to respond. This walk brought real insight into the daily struggles of people without homes and some of the injustices forced upon them.

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