March 2008

March 26th, 2008 by Noelle

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
March 5, 2008

As we wind down from a record-setting winter, it’s tough to imagine that Spring is just around the corner. Congratulations and thank you to our Physical Plant employees who have put forth herculean efforts to keep our stairs, walkways and parking lots accessible, not to mention our buildings open by shoveling off the roofs. I even saw Tammy Hill on a roof with a shovel. Thank you, Physical Plant! Spring break begins on Friday, March 14th at 3:20 p.m. I wish you all an enjoyable break, and safe travels for those leaving the area.

Credit Model Discussion

If you’ve read the agenda, you’ll know that this week at the Faculty meeting we’ll be discussing a proposal from the Credit Model Taskforce whose members have been working diligently all year. I was extremely impressed by both the Majority and Minority Reports coming from that group. If you have not read them, I recommend you take some time prior to the faculty meeting to do so and please plan to attend and participate in this important discussion on Wednesday.

Merit Pay

Following up on the February Faculty Meeting discussion on merit pay, I am scheduled to meet with the Faculty Welfare Committee this month. This is an important decision and it deserves a thorough and complete discussion.

Voluntary Transition to Retirement for Faculty

A year ago we presented a plan to you for voluntary transition to retirement. Last year, five faculty members enrolled in this plan and are now working halftime. I am pleased to share with you again the Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan for Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence. This plan will allow eligible faculty members to transition to half-time loads for a maximum of 5 years, at which time they will complete the transition to full retirement.
There are a number of potential benefits to this plan. First and foremost it provides an avenue to keep our treasured faculty in the classroom, where our students will benefit from their skill, expertise, and passion for teaching. Second, it provides a means for us to “grow the faculty.” We will use the salary cost savings from faculty who have transitioned to half-time to create new faculty lines, thereby increasing the total number of full-time faculty lines.

The attached document outlines the specifics of the plan, including the eligibility criteria and terms and conditions of the plan. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss this plan in further detail. Additionally, Laura Alexander and Carol Kuzdeba are available to answer your questions.

Annual Performance Evaluations

Note to Department Chairs and Directors — Annual Performance Evaluations for PAT’s and OS are due to the Principle Administrators by the end of March.

NEASC Report

A group of faculty and staff, lead by Dean Fitzpatrick have been working this year on the 5th year report to NEASC. Drafts of the report can be found at http://www.plymouth.edu/neasc/ If you have any comments or suggestions, please contact the author of the chapter or Bob Fitzpatrick directly.

Constitution Day 2008

Faculty — Are you interested in leading Constitution Day activities on campus? We are looking for a faculty leader for Fall 2008.
All … “educational institutions receiving Federal funding are required to hold an educational program pertaining to the United States Constitution on September 17 of each year.” (FR Doc 05-10355, [Federal Register: May 24, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 99)],[Notices],[Page 29727]

Constitution Day events 2006-2008

Faculty leaders have included John Krueckeberg (History), Mark Fischler (CJ), and Scott Coykendall (English). Here’s a sample of Constitution Day activities over the first three years of programming:

Year 1

  • Student Government got involved and distributed fact sheets about the Constitution and Student Rights in the Pawsway. A panel of speakers discussed the Constitution:
    • Marcia Blaine from the New England perspective of “who” signed the Constitution;
    • Bob Egbert on the Civil Liberties aspect of the Constitution;
    • Khuan Chong on the Constitution in a globally comparative perspective.
  • Students were invited to this public talk, in the fireplace lounge, and there was a question and answer period. Afterwards there was a patriotic cake and punch served.

Year 2

  • During lunch time at the HUB there were three presenters on the Constitution from 3 perspectives (political, historical, and practical). Cake and ice cream was served.
  • That evening we had a discussion on constitutional rights in a post 9/11 world with an ACLU lawyer and Assistant US Attorney in the multipurpose room.

Year 3

  • Focused specifically on the First Amendment.
  • Our student newspaper, The Clock, ran a special two-page spread that drew attention to press censorship.
  • Phil Lonergan’s sculpture students built towers to represent the five freedoms guaranteed in the First Amendment: religion, speech, press, assembly, & persuasion.
    • They also created a large sculpture of an anvil, representing the Patriot Act, squashing Uncle Sam.
  • Liz Ahl’s poetry workshop students not only printed broadsides of their constitution day poetry to be posted on the towers mentioned above, they read it in hallways and classrooms across the entire campus.
  • Students in two English classes composed essays, also posted on the towers, about the First Amendment and its value to them as college students.
  • The Student Senate hosted a table in the HUB at which students could “petition them for redress of grievances” and they also distributed pocket-sized copies of the U.S. Constitution
  • Finally, the Sidore Lecture Series hosted John Hutson, President of Franklin Pierce Law Center, to talk about, among other things, constitutional issues surrounding the U.S. “war on terror”.

If you are interested in leading Constitution Day activities for September 17, 2008 with a class or group of students, please contact me. I think it has been wonderful to see students from different disciplines taking on this project during each of the first three years (History, CJ, English).

New From Academic Affairs
Departments and Faculty

Art Department:

  • Franklin Pierce Law Center purchased a triptych of original prints titled “Enter By The Western Gate” by Annette Mitchell for their permanent art collection. The piece was selected from the “What’s New in New Hampshire Printmaking” Show in Concord, NH in February.

Department of Biological Sciences:

  • biologyProfessor Christopher Chabot traveled to Bridgewater State College in November 2007 with a number of his students to give presentations of PSU research at a Research Symposium. Cortney Cote, Jamie Holland, and Jeff Yelle presented “Pressure sensitivity in the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus“; Steve Crane and Lauren Moulis presented “Effects of melatonin on locomotor rhythms in the American Lobster, Homarus americanus”; and Amanda Blottiaux, Lu Ferraris, Ryan Flahive, Katie Grabek, and  Melinda Martin presented “Is the Circadian Clock Located in the Eyestalks of the American Lobster, Homarus americanus?”.

Business Department:

  • Small Business Institute (SBI) Director, Craig Zamzow is proud to announce that Plymouth State University SBI teams have set another record. For the tenth consecutive year our MBA students have placed in the top 3 places in the National Small Business Institute Case of the year Competition. Last year the winning teams took two first place awards in each category. No school had ever done that. This year there is a new category of competition for start-up business plans. Our students have placed in the top three positions in all three categories. No school has ever done that either! The exact positions in each category will be announced soon and awards presented at the National SBI Conference in March. Congratulations to these winning teams:
    • AeroSat Avionics, Inc. Team – Graduate Specialized Category
    • Dave Grose. Doriana Klumick, Bob Kingman. Matt Krause
    • Craig Zamzow, Faculty Advisor
    • Bradford Veneer and Paneling Team – Graduate Comprehensive Category
    • Samantha Stalnaker, James Dean, Bob McGeough
    • Craig Zamzow, Faculty Advisor
    • Portsmouth Social Club – Startup Business Plan Category
    • National Runner-up Award
    • Doriana Klumick
    • Duncan McDougall, Faculty Advisor
  • Warren Mason, member of the James Jones Society’s Board of Directors, recently attended their annual Writing Symposium in Robinson, Illinois. He was elected both Treasurer and Chair of the Finance & Development Committee.
  • Warren Mason visited the news studios of NBC and MSNBC television in Manchester during January’s New Hampshire Primary, and he spoke at length about New Hampshire Primary issues with Chris Matthews, the host of MSNBC’s “Hardball.”
  • Doriann Klumick’s (MBA student) plan for the Portsmouth Social Club received a National Runner-up Award in the SBI Competition in the new “Business Start-up Plan” category. Duncan McDougall was the advisor.
  • Duncan McDougall is serving on (and attended in February) the Board of Directors of the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs meeting.
  • Brad Allen recently completed a joint project with Keith Markley (PSU Business 1981), President and CEO of Liberty Aerospace in Melbourne, Florida, involving three Plymouth State business students. Liberty Aerospace is a small aircraft manufacturing firm producing a carbon fiber training aircraft named the XL-2 designed for flight schools. Liberty was seeking international marketing research to determine where to initiate manufacturing licensing agreements around the world based upon a variety of economic, cultural and industry criteria. Over three months, the three Plymouth State business students, Halen Ganley, Heather Parsons and Peter Greene, conducted research on over forty different international countries ranging from India to South Africa to determine a logical licensing strategy based upon industry criteria shared by the executive leadership team of Liberty Aerospace. The students utilized a number of market techniques taught in the PSU business programs such as the PESTEL and SWOT analysis. The completion of the project was a meeting to be held at the corporate headquarters in Melbourne where each student presented to the entire executive staff of Liberty Aerospace and to deliver the 90 page research report. The students and Professor Allen flew to Florida during Winterim on Thursday January 3rd and presented on Friday the 4th. Upon arriving at Liberty, Mr. Markley gave the students a one hour tour of the manufacturing facility where they were introduced to the full executive staff. The presentation took about ninety minutes including a  discussion among senior marketing, manufacturing, legal and sales executives about the findings of each student’s research and the merit of the conclusions.

Center for Rural Partnerships:

  • Thad Guldbrandsen was recently notified that his co-authored book, “Local Democracy Under Siege,” has been awarded the Delmos Jones and Jagna Sharff Memorial Prize for the Critical Study of North America by the Society for the Anthropology of North America (SANA). This prize is awarded every two years and honors a book that deals with “an important social issue to the discipline of anthropology that has broader implications for social change or justice, and that is accessible beyond the discipline of anthropology. In congratulating the authors of the book, one committee member commented, “we were particularly impressed with the way this study challenges not only definitions of activism and political involvement, it also provides a view of how citizens articulate their own relationships to government. Although broadly accessible to a wide audience of readers, this volume is also a meticulously rich and rigorous ethnography.” Thad and his co-authors have been invited to the SANA conference in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina in April where they will receive their award.

Communication and Media Studies

  • Kylo-Patrick Hart and Metasebia Woldemariam presented the paper “Alienation, Sexuality, and Subversion: Two Cinematic Perspectives” at the annual meeting of the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association.

Education Department:

  • Michael Fischler presented a paper, “Prejudice and Discrimination: Time to See, Tell and Do,” for the February 14th Sidore Lecture Series.
  • Marcel Lebrun recently presented to the Franklin Elementary teachers on behavioral interventions for school improvement and to 10 schools at SERESC on positive behavioral universal interventions
  • Pat Cantor and Mary Cornish presented a half-day session, “Growing Great Toddler Teachers: Supporting Staff in Guiding and Disciplining Toddlers,” at the New Hampshire Association for the Education of Young Children/Vermont Association for the Education of Children Administrators’ Conference in Fairlee, Vermont.
  • Joss French presented his work on media literacy in a panel discussion entitled “The Politics of Containment: A Look at How Students and Teachers are Contained In and Out of the Classroom” at the American Educational Studies Association Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. At the New England Conference on Multicultural Education in Hartford, Connecticut, in a panel discussion he presented “Promoting Diversity in the Northeast: How Can We Help One Another.” Joss presented how reflective practice protocol could be used to address local community cultural issues.

Languages and Linguistics:

  • During the American Council of the Teaching of Foreign Languages conference last fall, a session on the Oral Proficiency Interview was offered. Interviews and tests are required. After successfully completing both, a qualifying faculty member can then apply to become an examiner in his/her language. PSU attendees Marie-Therese Gardner (French) and Heidi Burke (German) are becoming qualified examiners. In February, Marie-Therese successfully completed her interview and test, and has been rated as SUPERIOR. Heidi will be taking completing her interview at a later date.
  • Eric Cintron presented at the National Association of Hispanic and Latino Studies on February 11-16, 2008 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Music, Theatre and Dance Department:

  • Jonathan Santore’s composition “Kalevala Fragments” has been awarded second prize in the University of South Carolina Choral Composition Contest. It will be performed by the USC Concert Choir in a concert on April 11th, and after that will be featured in the choir’s repertoire during their Summer 2008 tour of China. Jonathan has been invited to the USC campus for the April 11th concert, and will give presentations to composition students at USC while there.
  • On February 21, Jonathan Santore gave a presentation on his music to the Concert Choir at Proctor Academy (directed by MTD adjunct faculty member Kris Johnson). On their upcoming tour, the Proctor Choir will be performing Santore’s music at sites including Walter Reed Army Hospital and the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, DC.
  • On February 1 at Moultonborough Academy, Dan Perkins and the Chamber Singers presented a workshop and performance about their experiences in Vietnam. On February 22, Perkins and the Chamber Singers hosted St. Michael’s College Chorale (VT) in a collaborative workshop and exchange concert.
  • The Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance hosted the 2008 NH Music Educator Solo & Ensemble Festival on Sat., Feb. 16th. This festival brought approximately 400 musicians (ages 9-18), their music teachers, and their parents to Plymouth State to perform for guest adjudicators. Music Education Program Coordinator, Holly Oliver, served as the host representative and was assisted by a team of 40 PSU music education majors. Guest adjudicators for the event included many PSU faculty members: Dr. Rik Pfenninger, Dr. Robert Swift, Dr. Gary Corcoran, Dr. Carleen Graff, Aubrie Dionne, Tim Gilmore, Kenda Corcoran, Debbie Gibson, and Peter Templeton.
  • Kathleen Arecchi was a judge at the NATS-Boston Art Song and Aria and Musical Theatre Singing competitions held at Boston University on two weekends in February. One of her PSU students, Brady Lynch ’11, placed 1st in the college division (ages 18-22) and received a $300 cash award.
  • Rik Pfenninger recently scored the music on a commercial for Squam River Condos. The commercial is scheduled to air in New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Massachusetts. Rik also presented a clinic/workshop for New Hampshire Jazz All State titled “Current Trends in Music Technology.

Social Science Department:

  • Katherine Donahue (Anthropology/Social Science) has had an article accepted for publication by the International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World (ISIM) Review. The article, titled “Islam in the Family of Zacarias Moussaoui”, is partially based on an interview Kate had with Aicha el-Wafi, the mother of Zacarias Moussaoui, in February, 2007.
  • Rebecca Noel gave a presentation at the Plymouth Historical Society on February 12, “Samuel Read Hall and Holmes Plymouth Academy: New Hampshire’s First Teacher Educator.” Her entry on “The Child’s Body” appears in the just-published book, Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life, ed. Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teresa Wajda (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2008).
  • Mark Okrant did a presentation and signed copies of his most recent book, “I Knew You When,” at the Yale University Bookstore in New Haven, on February 2nd.
  • Marcia Schmidt Blaine presented “A Woman that Keeps Good Orders: Female Tavern Keepers in Provincial New Hampshire” for the New Hampshire Humanities Council at the Exeter Public  Library on Feb. 21. Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Memorandum

Date: March 4, 2008
To: All Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence
From: Julie Bernier, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
RE: Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan for Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence

A year ago we presented a plan to you for voluntary transition to retirement. Last year, five faculty members enrolled in this plan and are now working halftime. I am pleased to share with you again the Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan for Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence. This plan will allow eligible faculty members to transition to half-time loads for a maximum of 5 years, at which time they will complete the transition to full retirement.

There are a number of potential benefits to this plan. First and foremost it provides an avenue to keep our treasured faculty in the classroom, where our students will benefit from their skill, expertise, and passion for teaching. Second, it provides a means for us to “grow the faculty.” We will use the salary cost savings from faculty who have transitioned to half-time to create new faculty lines, thereby increasing the total number of full-time faculty lines.

The attached document outlines the specifics of the plan, including the eligibility criteria and terms and conditions of the plan. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss this plan in further detail. Additionally, Laura Alexander and Carol Kuzdeba are available to answer your questions.

The Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan
For Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence
March 2008
Plymouth State University

The Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan for Tenure Track Faculty and Faculty in Residence

Plymouth State University is offering a program for tenured faculty to voluntarily transition into retirement. This plan allows eligible benefited faculty to work half-time (12 credits per year) for up to five years prior to retirement. This program can begin as early as Spring Semester 2009 with an effective retirement transition date to begin no later than December 31, 2013. This election is irrevocable.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for the Transition Plan, a benefits eligible faculty member must meet the following c onditions:

  • Be a tenured faculty member or Faculty in Residence and not be on Long-Term Disability or Workers’ Compensation.
  • Must have reached age 62 by departure date in order to attain USNH retiree status including eligibility for the Medicare Complimentary Plan, ARC minimum guarantee, and medical coverage bridge to age 65.
  • Must be a participant in a USNH approved retirement plan and have ten years of benefits eligible service from age 52 to 62 in order to attain USNH retiree status (see above bullet.)
    • A faculty member who meets the eligibility requirements and is accepted under the provisions of the plan will receive 50% of his/her pay for regularly budgeted work performance plus an additional increment to offset the cost of medical benefits.
    • Part-time status will not exceed twelve (12) credits per year (fall/spring) of graduate or undergraduate teaching.

“ The medical contribution required during the reduced appointment time is based on the percentage of the reduced appointment. This means a faculty member with a 50% to 74%appointment contributes the same as a 75% to 100% appointment faculty member plus 50% of the employer’ s contribution. A separate bonus payment (not to be included in the salary base) will be paid to the faculty member to offset the plus 50% of the employer’ s contribution which is required during the reduced appointment time. This amount will be recalculated annually to reflect changes in employee medical contribution rates. This bonus is taxable and is being received in recognition of services to PSU.”

  1. Contributions for Dental, Life and Long Term Disability benefits and Retirement contributions are based on regular budgeted earnings from the reduced percent time appointment. The Dental Basic Plan is the only option for 50% appointments, and 1.5-times-salary Life Insurance and 60% Long Term Disability are the only life and disability options. Since the Life Insurance and Long Term Disability benefits are based on age and salary, each faculty member’ s contribution for these benefits will differ depending on these two factors.
  2. The Tuition Waiver benefit will be based on the 50% time appointment. A faculty member is not eligible for the Tuition Waiver program for themselves, their spouse or eligible dependent children after the departure date. Courses currently enrolled in will be covered until the end of the semester.

2008 costs for Delta Basic Dental plan:

  • $5.65 bi-weekly for single coverage
  • $15.45 bi-weekly for two person coverage
  • $28.41 bi-weekly for family coverage

Terms and Conditions of the Plan

  1. A faculty member who is accepted for the Retirement Transition Plan will retain all rights and responsibilities of tenure, continue to be a voting faculty member, and retain office space during the transition period of 50% time teaching.
  2. The decision to elect the Retirement Transition Plan shall be irrevocable.
  3. Faculty who choose the Retirement Transition Plan shall retire following no more than 5 years (10 semesters) of teaching at 50% time.
  4. Faculty who choose the Retirement Transition Plan shall not be eligible for sabbatical.
  5. Faculty who retire under this Faculty Transition Plan cannot be rehired into a benefitseligible position within USNH. However, they can apply and may be considered for non status part-time employment at USNH institutions. Part-time shall consist of a maximum teaching load of twelve (12) credits per year.
  6. A faculty member who wishes to collect his/her retirement benefits while continuing to be employed in a status position may do so if employed in a 50% time position.

Application Process

In order to apply for the Retirement Transition Plan, a faculty member must complete the Plymouth State University Voluntary Transition to Retirement Application (found at the end of this document) and provide endorsement of his/her Department Chair. Application Deadline Effective Departure Date (Last Day Worked)
September 1 for Spring transition No later than 10 semesters from commencement of February 1 for Fall transition transition period The Voluntary Retirement Transition Plan for Tenured Faculty and Faculty in Residence For Plymouth State University

Application/Agreement

Name: _____
Position Title: _____
Age: Department: _____
Transition Date Elected:
My first semester at half time work will be ____________________________________ semester year
My last semester of half time work will be ____________________________________ semester year
I request to participate in the Plymouth State University’ s Transition Plan program. I have read and fully understand the terms and conditions of the Plan as specified in this document.

  • In return for accepting the Transition Plan for Faculty, s/he agrees to voluntarily retire no later than 10 semesters from commencement of transition period, including giving up any rights to his/her position, including tenure at time of retirement.
  • The decision to elect the Transition Plan for Faculty shall be irrevocable.
  • Faculty who retire under the Transition Plan for Faculty cannot be rehired into a benefits-eligible position within the USNH. However, they can apply and may be considered for non-status part-time employment at USNH institutions. Part-time shall consist of a maximum teaching load of twelve (12) credits per year (fall/spring).
  • Birth certificate must be provided to support birth date. I agree with the terms and conditions of the Plymouth State University Retirement Transition Plan for Faculty, and I hereby notify Plymouth State University of my intent on or before December 31, 2013, to voluntarily retire from my employment. I understand this decision is final.

___ I understand that the annual salary for my 50% position will be determined at the beginning of the transition period. My base annual salary will be recalculated on an annual basis.
___ I understand that the medical contribution required during the reduced appointment time is based on the percentage of the reduced appointment. This means an employee with a 50% to 74% appointment contributes the same as a 75% to 100% appointment employee plus 50% of the employer’ s contribution. A separate bonus payment (not to be included in my salary base) will be paid to me to offset the plus 50% of the employer’ s contribution which is required during the reduced appointment time. This amount will be recalculated annually to reflect changes in employee medical contribution rates. This bonus is taxable
and is being received in recognition of service to PSU.
__ The bonus to offset the additional cost of medical coverage does not apply to me. Either I am not enrolled in a USNH medical plan or I am covered as a dependent in a USNH medical plan. I also am not entitled to the medical waiver while on the transition plan. Policy USYV.A.7.2.9.2 is attached below.
7.2.9 Retirement Income. Retirement income benefits are subject to IRS regulations.
7.2.9.1 Benefits may begin any time after the faculty/staff member fully retires or terminates his/her
employment or as described in USY V.A.7.2.9.2.
7.2.9.2 A faculty/staff member age 59½ or older who wishes to begin payment from his/her regular USNH retirement income funds while continuing to be employed on a reduced basis in a status position may do so only with appropriate departmental dean/director and institutional approval under the conditions described below. Unless otherwise defined by campus policy, institutional approval shall mean approval by the appropriate Vice President (or equivalent) for the area. Benefit contributions during the reduced appointment time are based on the percentage of the reduced appointment. For appointments reduced below 75% time, see USY V.A.2.3 and 2.4. The faculty/staff member remains subject to USNH policies, including performance requirements and reduction in force policies. Campus policies may also apply.
7.2.9.3 Reduction in service (of any amount) and selected retirement date up to two years in the future. A faculty/staff member may reduce his/her appointment to any percent time, for up to two and one-half years, and submit a retirement date no more than two and one-half years after the date of the reduced appointment.
7.2.9.3.1 Reduction to 50% time or less service and selected retirement date up to five years in the future. A faculty/staff member who wishes to reduce his/her appointment to 50% time or less may submit a request for a retirement date no more than five years from the beginning date of the reduced appointment.
Faculty Member Signature Date
PSU Human Resource Authorization Date
PSU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Date
PSU Vice President for Financial Affairs Date
******To be Completed by Department Chair******
1. Indicate the arrangement which will be made for the courses and services for which the applicant is normally responsible, specifying in detail the reassignment or replacement personnel and cost.
Signature of Department Chair Date
Submit Competed Form to the Provost/ Vice President for Academic Affairs

Featured in Plymouth Magazine

Example Image

Building a First-Year Class

PSU’s overwhelming success with enrollment for the 2015–16 academic year was the result of focused multi-year investments in admissions, marketing, academic and co-curricular programs, and new and repurposed facilities.

Example Image

First in the (New) Nation

A Young Man’s Journey from a Nepalese Refugee Camp to the New Hampshire Polls » Southern Bhutan. Early 1990s. Members of an ethnic minority population, the Hindu Lhotshampas, began fleeing rising levels of persecution by the Bhutanese government. Denied their citizenship rights because of religious and cultural differences, the group—more than 100,000 strong—eventually sought protection […]

Example Image

Mary Lyon: Stunning at a Century

Mary Lyon Hall, the beloved grande dame of the Plymouth State campus, is celebrating her centennial this year. Over the past century, she’s been renovated, remodeled, updated, and made energy efficient, all while retaining her stately elegance. More than a campus icon, Mary Lyon has been home to generations of students, many of whom have […]