December 2010

June 29th, 2011 by gbeckwith

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
December 1, 2010

Colleagues, as we approach the end of the semester, I wish everyone a very safe and happy holiday season.

The OS and PAT’s are conducting their annual fundraising events to support student scholarships.

OS Festival of Trees Deadline Extended! The 3rd Annual Festival of trees will be held at the Senior Center on December 3 and 4, in conjunction with the annual Plymouth Holiday parade. We hope you plan on joining us this year by donating a decorated tree that will be won by one of the lucky visitors. Departments, businesses, groups, organizations, families, etc are welcome to join in and donate a fully decorated artificial tree to be raffled off. Proceeds will be used to help support the Operating Staff Endowed Scholarship and related expenses. 

Register your tree by visiting www.surveymonkey.com/s/osfestivaloftrees or by contacting a committee member.
Please contact Nikki Nunes at ext. 53071 or Christine Hoch at ext. 52593.

PAT Raffle

Tickets available at the HUB Pawsway this week (Monday-Thursday) from 12-1:30 p.m.  You can also purchase raffle tickets directly from one of the members of the Fundraising Committee – Angela Adams (Highland Hall 233/ext. 5-3097), Gail Carr (Speare 116/ext. 5-2228), Joyce Larson (Speare 205A/ext. 5-2846), and Karen Urciuoli (Holmes House 224/ext. 5-2915)

 

To view the raffle prizes: (http://oz.plymouth.edu/~amadams/PAT2010RafflePrizes.doc) (and there are more items being donated daily).  Tickets are $1 each or 6 for $5.00.  The drawing will take place at the December 3, 2010 PAT meeting.

 

PAT Silent Auction- Reserved PARKING SPACE for one year !

The winner may have a parking spot in any sanctioned PSU lot!  If you cannot visit them at the HUB, but want to place a bid, please e-mail Karen Urciuoli.

 

NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

 

Art

  • Catherine S. Amidon, published “Enrico Riley: Journey in Giant Steps,” Music in Art: International Journal for Music Iconography, Vol XXXV, no 1-2, Spring-Fall, 2010.
    • Jason Swift was chosen by the NH Department of Education as representative to attend a two- day standards setting board at Educational Testing Services in Princeton, NJ, in November, to set cut scores for the Praxis II test for Art Education Certification to recommend to the NH Department of Education.
    • The Myers Gallery at Teachers College, Columbia University, exhibited Jason Swift’s artwork from their permanent collection.  The Myers Collection in an exhibition titled “The Myers Art Collection Showcase” in November.
    • Henrieke Strecker (Photography) has her work on exhibit in three galleries: AVA Gallery in Lebanon, NH, Spheris Gallery in Hanover, NH, and Art Miami 2010 (known as Miami’s premiere anchor fair).  Art Miami kicks off the opening day of Art Week — the first week of December — when thousands of collectors, dealers, curators, and artists descend upon Miami to experience the string of contemporary and high-energy fairs that the city is known for. Distinguished for its depth, diversity and quality, Art Miami showcases the best in modern and contemporary art from 100 international art galleries and prominent art institutions.

Biological Sciences

  • Chris Chabot was a co-editor of the October issue of Current Zoology entitled “Horseshoe crab behavior” along with Win Watson (Dept. of Biological Sciences, UNH).  (View the cover at http://www.actazool.org/temp/b503.jpg)
    • Larry Spencer served as a pre-publication reviewer for a book on the history of ecology that is being considered for publication by the University of California Press.  Some of the materials have previously appeared in the Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, and the UC Press solicited feedback from Spencer and others about the usefulness of the materials in book form. He also recently completed a review for Choice, a publication of the American Library Association, on an atlas of invertebrate and vertebrate anatomy.

Center for the Environment

  • Mark Green is co-author on a feature cover article titled “Tapping Environmental History to Recreate America’s Colonial Hydrology” in the December 1, 2010 issue of Environmental Science and Technology.
  • The Center for the Environment’s fall colloquium concludes on December 8 at 4 pm with a presentation by Will Abbott, policy director at the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire’s Forests, on “America’s Forest in 2076:  Will They Survive 300 years of Independence?” The series this fall, organized by Angela Uhlman, has featured a wide range of interesting talks filling the room with an audience of students, staff, faculty, and members of the community.
  • Brian Eisenhauer and graduate student Christian Weber are working on a research project analyzing the social, economic, and ecological effects of second home development in the Northern Forest region where second home ownership is a prevalent land use. They recently hosted a meeting at Plymouth State involving researchers from Cornell University, University of Vermont, University of Maine, and Penn State University who are part of the research team.
  • Mark Green was invited to present at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Geology and Planetary Science on November 11, “A Catchment-Scale Hydrologic Response to Soil Calcium Silicate Amendment.”
  • Mary Ann McGarry was a panelist for women’s science at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Women in Science and Technology Forum in Manchester on November 5th, 2010.
  • Research associate Doug Earick, in collaboration with PSU’s Department of Education’s Early Childhood Program, has received a Mathematics & Science Partnership grant from the NH Department of Education for a project on Teacher as Researcher: The role of inquiry, and learning progressions through environmental science studies
  • Aaron Johnson from the Center’s Environmental Research Laboratory will be working this winter with the Israel’s River Volunteer Advisory Group on monitoring the river in Lancaster, NH. This project is funded by the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, North Country Region as a sub-award from the Coös County Outreach Initiative of the Center for Rural Partnerships. The partnership with the Israel’s River Group has led to the collecting of water samples to be analyzed by Mark Green for their isotopic signature which will help them better understand the dynamics of the river’s hydrology.
  • Doug Earick presented at the Center’s new Brown Bag Lunch Talks. These talks are designed for sharing information about projects and creating a forum for idea sharing.
  • Lisa Doner presented a brown bag lunch seminar for the Center for the Environment on November 16 about her research to study the deposits in the bottom of lakes in Iceland and how the North Atlantic Oscillation affects the process of deposition.
  • As part of her program for an MS in Environmental Science and Policy, graduate student Olivia Bartlett recently defended her thesis, “Prioritizing Conservation Efforts in the Squam Lakes Watershed Using Knowledge-Based Models.” This project created logic-based models using conservation criteria established by a land trust, the Squam Lakes Conservation Society (SLCS), to address the need for a systematic, data-driven approach to prioritizing conservation efforts. The model prioritizes areas within the Squam Lakes watershed and evaluates existing conservation easements based on the SLCS criteria. As the needs and values of the community that operates through SLCS can change over time, the model can be adapted to accommodate these changes.

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • On Tuesday, November 30, student presentations were showcased as follows:  Tourism Management & Policy student Jennifer Aldrich, “Regional Tourism Marking in Central New Hampshire;”  Center for the Environment graduate student, “The Community Energy Roadmap;” Communication and Media Studies student Kelly Rice, “Social Media and the Weeks Act Centennial Celebration;” Education graduate student Mike Neveln, “White Mountains Institute Family Hostel;”  Communication and Media Studies student Nicole DeGrandpre presented her film, “The Life and Times of W.R. Brown: Land, Labor, and Business in New Hampshire Timberlands,” based on a paper by Linda Upham-Bornstein.  Congratulations to all students!
  • Ben Amsden and Thad Guldbrandsen delivered a talk entitled “The Local Food Movement: Recipe for Change or Pie in the Sky” at the Environmental Science and Policy colloquium series.
  • Ben Amsden participated in the Northern New Hampshire Tourism Conference in Whitefield, NH, the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) workshop in Burlington, VT, and the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture and Food System working group meetings in Albany, NY.
  • Fran Belcher attended annual meetings of the Northern Communities Investment Corporation, Foundation for Healthy Communities, NH Rural Health Roundtable and the North Country Health Consortium.  The focus of the latter three meetings was the Accountable Care Act and its impact on rural health care and the healthcare workforce in northern communities.
  • The Center for Rural Partnerships and the Center for Active Living and Healthy Communities collaborated on a proposal to the National Institute for Food and Agriculture for the Eco Learning Farmsteads Community Planning Council.
  • Fran Belcher and Thad Guldbrandsen joined with the Northern Forest Higher Education Resource Network (NFHERN), Lyndon State’s Center for Rural Students to develop a proposal to the New England Board of Higher Education to address college access for rural, first generation college students.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen presented “The Community Energy Roadmap” as part of the College of Graduate Studies brownbag series.

Communication and Media Studies

  • Annette Holba presented three papers at the National Communication Association convention in San Francisco. The papers were entitled, “Hannah Arendt and Philosophical Leisure: Building a Bridge to the Political Realm” (Philosophy of Communication Division); “Hasidic Tales: Pedagogy for Communication Ethics” (Communication Ethics Division); and “Women and Leisure: Communicative Leaders for the 21st Century” (Women’s Caucus Division).

Computer Science

  • Roger Marshall. Published “Modeling DNA/RNA Strings Using Resistor—Capacitor (RC) Ladder Networks,” The Computer Journal (2010) 53(6): 644-660, Oxford University Press.

Counselor Education and School Psychology

  • Hridaya Hall presented an educational session entitled “Where Cultural Awareness meets Skills Instruction: Using a Narrative Strategy to Support Trainee Cultural Awareness” at the North Atlantic Region Association for Counselor Education and Supervision conference in New Brunswick, NJ.   She also, in collaboration with Dr. Allison Smith of Antioch New England, contributed 4 theory-grounded activities to a recent book publication. The submissions included “Finding A Voice,” “My Metaphor,” “Shadow Party,” “E-Motion”, in S. Degges-White & N. L. Davis (Eds.) Integrating the Expressive Arts into Counseling Practice (2010).

Criminal Justice

  • David Mackey with Michael Smith from Saint Anselm College presented “Body Scans, Wiretapping and Other Inquiries:  College Students’ Perceptions of the Reasonableness/Intrusiveness of Homeland Security Searches” at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology.
  • Kristine Miller published in The Criminologist, Vol 35, Issue 6,  “Teaching Tip: Engaging Students in Criminological Theory”.  She also attended the American Society of Criminology conference in San  Francisco and presented preliminary research that she and Stephanie Halter are working on entitled “Integrating Real-world Experiences into Undergraduate Criminal Justice Courses: Practice, Pedagogy and Effects on Student Learning.”

Education

  • Susan Shapiro presented “Facilitating Friendships for ALL Kids” and “Differentiated Instruction in the Inclusive Classroom”, at the Maine Down Syndrome Annual Conference for parents and educators, in Portland, Maine, on Saturday, November 13.

Environmental Science and Policy

  • Warren Tomkiewicz, Mark Turski, and Christina Maki (an ES&P graduate student) attended the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Denver from October 31 – November 4.  Warren presented a poster entitled ”Gulf of Maine: Problem-based Learning Using Real-Time Oceanographic Data”; Mark presented a paper entitled “Utilizing the White Mountain National Forest As A Learning Tool in an Introductory Earth System Science Course for Non-majors.”
  • Mark Turski facilitated a discussion of the film in the Community Cinema series in Concord entitled “Deep Down: A Story From the Heart of Coal Country”.  He was assisted by Warren Tomkiewicz, Lisa Doner, and Mark Fischler from the Criminal Justice Dept.
  • Mary Ann McGarry was a panelist for women’s science at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Women in Science and Technology Forum in Manchester on November 5th, 2010.
  • Lisa Doner presented a brown bag lunch seminar for the Center for the Environment on November 16 about her research to study the deposits in the bottom of lakes in Iceland and how the North Atlantic Oscillation affects the process of deposition.
  • Research assistant professor Doug Earick, in collaboration with PSU’s Department of Education’s Early Childhood Program, has received a Mathematics & Science Partnership grant from the NH Department of Education for a project on Teacher as Researcher: The role of inquiry, and learning progressions through environmental science studies

Global Education Office (GEO)

  • Jess Morel, Kirk McClelland and Jessie DeBow attended the Region XI NAFSA: Association of International Educators conference in Warwick Rhode Island November 9-11. Jess participated in a panel presenting “Key Components of Internships Abroad.”
  • GEO held its first annual open house November 17 as part of International Week festivities. Guest chefs from Columbia and Viet Nam prepared refreshments, students who have interned and studied abroad presented on their experiences and shared photos, and student peer advisors led tours of Bagley House.
  • Deb Regan was interviewed for the November issue of GlobaLinks NewsWire. The topic was curriculum integration in study abroad:

http://globalinksnewswire.com/2652/curriculum-integration-makes-study-abroad-possible-for-structured-majors/.

Health and Human Performance

  • Linda Levy and undergraduate students Austri Silver, Josselyn DeLemos, Patty Curley, Kevin Silva, and grad students Chris Thomas and Alicia Edwards were highlighted in the National Athletic Trainer’s monthly publication for their leadership in providing training to local emergency medical technicians and firefighters regarding spine boarding and helmet removal techniques on the ice.
  • Christian Bisson presented a workshop at NHAHPERD on a new teaching strategy when instructing how to build climbing anchor systems. The presentation was based on his recent chapter in a climbing book from Human Kinetics. Dr. Bisson co-presented this workshop with  Nick Nelsen, a Sophomore in Adventure Education.

Library and Academic Support Services

  • Ellen Marie Murphy was a Conference Organizer/Host at NERCOMP Sig “Course Evaluations: buying, building and distributing, November 4th, 2010.

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting was elected Vice President of Northern New England TESOL, the regional affiliate of TESOL International.  At the conference, Whiting presented a paper, “Oral Language Podcast Portfolios: Implications for L2 Teaching and Learning,” and was also a discussant on a roundtable, “The New Nativism and the Role of the ELT Professional.”
  • Katharine Harrington presented a paper entitled “Je parle ‘le français de la Vallée’: Accommodating French Heritage Speakers in a University Level Beginning French Language Program” at the American Council for Quebec Studies conference in Burlington, Vermont on November 6.  She has also been awarded a grant from the French American Cultural Exchange to support her efforts in organizing a French film festival. The first annual White Mountain French film festival will be held Feb. 24-27 at the Flying Monkey.

Mathematics

  • Dana Ernst took six math majors to the annual ATMNE conference in Nashua on November 8.
  • John Donovan attended a meeting of NCTM’s editorial panel of “Mathematics Teacher”.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Carleen Graff presented a lecture (in German)-recital on George Crumb’s “Eine kleine Mitternachtmusik” at the German Piano Teacher’s Kongress (a part of the European Piano Teachers Association) on October 30 in Schwerin.
  • Dance faculty, Lois Hanks, Lisa Travis, Lenore Sousa and Amanda Whitworth will perform and collaborate with the Ninth State Youth Theater and Orchestra for a production of the “Children’s Nutcracker” at the Flying Monkey in Plymouth, NH.

Pakistan Project

  • Special thanks to senior Bryan Funk, junior Sam Wisel, and their team of undergraduates for staging the dynamic Flood of Flags event during International Week. Thanks to their initiative, over $3, 000 was raised to support alumni flood relief and recovery efforts.  With facilitation by project director Blake Allen, AP reporter Holly Ramer and U.S. Department of State writer Carrie Loewenthal Massey interviewed Bryan and Sam for a global audience.  Here is a link to the initial AP article: http://www.boston.com/news/education/k_12/articles/2010/11/12/nh_college_helps_pakistani_flood_victims/
    Here is a link to the America.gov article: http://www.america.gov/st/educ-english/2010/November/20101123164724eirrac0.8846857.html?CP.rss=true
  • The Pakistan project is currently focused on its in-country phase.  Blake has been working with the Islamabad-based team on the implementation of Master Action Plans by last summer’s delegates.  With a geographically dispersed cohort, the educators are dealing with destabilized conditions due to continuing political challenges, militancy in Baluchistan and along the borders, and the aftermath of last summer’s devastating floods.  For delegates living in Gilgit-Baltistan, the onset of deep winter in the northern areas is a complicating factor.
  • In collaboration with officials at the State Department and U.S. Embassy, Islamabad, Blake and the Pakistan team also have been working on the next nomination and selection process.  State Department funding will support another geographically, ethnically and linguistically diverse delegation of forty Pakistani educators to participate in next summer’s institute.  Two alumni leaders from previous projects also will be included.
  • The State Department recently hosted a three day Recipient Symposium, “Bringing Together America’s Stewards.” It brought together the Department’s grants management professionals and recipients to share information about new directions affecting Federal assistance programs.  Blake and Susan Amburg, director of Sponsored Programs, had opportunities to meet with counterparts working in the international sector and with State Department officials.

Social Science

  • Bryon Middlekauff published in the Encyclopedia of Physical Geography, focusing on the western explorer John Wesley Powell who was the first to travel and document the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River.
  • David Starbuck (Anthropology and Sociology) was one of the curators for an exhibit on “New Hampshire Glassmakers: 1780-1886” that opened at the Peterborough Historical Society on November 13 and runs through February 19, 2011.  This displays the finest examples of glass made at New Hampshire’s five glass factories.  David gave one of the opening lectures on November 13, on “The New England Glassworks in Temple: New Hampshire’s Boldest Experiment in Early Glassmaking.”   David also gave lectures in Temple on October 19  (“The Archaeology of New Hampshire”), at Enfield Shaker Village on Oct. 21 (“The Archaeology of the Shakers”), in Campton on October 23 (“An Archaeological Tour of Turkey’s Greatest Sites”), and in Glens Falls, NY on November 6 (“The Archaeology of the French and Indian War”).
  • Steve Whitman travelled to Anse-a-Pitres, Haiti to teach a permaculture design workshop during Sadhana Forest Haiti’s “Seeds After the Earthquake” international gathering October 26-November 5, 2010. The workshop included building a solar photovoltaic array, the creation of a permaculture design for the project headquarters, tree planting, and clay seedball making.
  • Stacey G. Yap, Thaddeus C. Guldbrandsen and Peng-Khuan Chong participated in the November 6 annual conference of the New England Association for Asian Studies that took place at the University of Vermont’s Burlington campus. The panel, “Vietnam:  Culture, Preservation and Change” that Stacey organized was well attended with participants coming from areas ranging from Quebec to Pennsylvania. With Khuan as the moderator and discussant, Thad presented his paper, “Architecture of Longing: History, Memory, and the Politics of Place in Vietnam”; Stacey presented, “Rejuvenating the Past to Rethink the Future: Historic Preservation in Vietnam.”
  • Katherine Donahue (Anthropology/Social Science) reviewed Susan Terrio’s “Judging Mohammed: Juvenile Delinquency, Immigration, and Exclusion at the Paris Palace of Justice” (2009, Stanford University Press) for the journal French Politics, Culture & Society (forthcoming). She also attended the Executive Board meeting of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe at the annual American Anthropological Association meeting in New Orleans.

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin edited a special issue of Health & Social Work on “Health Inequalities” and co-authored “Health Care Reform and Health Disparities: Implications for Social Workers,” November 2010,35(4).
  • The department’s Social Work Advisory Board held its fall meeting on November 5.
  • Christine Rine authored a book review in a Special Issue of Health & Social Work on Health Inequalities titled: “The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger,” November 2010, 35(4).

University Studies

  • On October 3rd, Patrick Cate (University Studies) and Joyce Larson (Registrar) presented “The Targeted Advising Model:  A Fast Pass to Student Success” as a three-hour preconference seminar to advisors from across the country at the annual conference of NACADA. An outline of the model was also published in the NACADA Clearinghouse which can be found here: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Targeted-Advising-Model.htm

 

November 2010

June 28th, 2011 by gbeckwith

Monthly Report to the Faculty

Provost Julie Bernier
November 3, 2010

Inclement Weather

Earlier this week a message was sent from Human Relations regarding our inclement weather procedures.  Please note, the following message will be sent to students this week:

Plymouth State University normally remains open through inclement weather. Because most students live within minutes of the campus, every effort is made to avoid an official closing. There may be times, however, when an emergency or extreme weather conditions necessitate a general closing of the University (see Inclement Weather notification below).

 

Students should make reasonable decisions when considering travel or family needs and faculty should respect these decisions. Students should notify their professors at once if they are unable to report to class due to poor driving conditions.   During finals week, classes WILL NOT be cancelled.  If inclement weather is anticipated, students should communicate with their professors in advance or make arrangements to stay locally.

 

In the event of severe weather or an emergency, the University Administration will do all it can to decide on and post notifications of class/event cancellations and/or facility closures by 6:00 a.m. For canceling evening classes, the decision is usually made and communicated no later than 3:00 p.m.  Every effort will be made to make the decision as early as possible.

 

Inclement Weather notifications will be communicated via the following means:

 

PSU Alert Emergency Text Messaging System (sign-up at: plymouth.edu/alerts)

University Web site

“Need2Know” campus e-mail (formerly PSU-Announce)

PSU Alert/Storm Line (603) 535-3535

myPlymouth announcements

Local media

 

 

Report on Online Teaching

Last year PSU offered 273 fully online courses, a 49% increase from the previous year.  This included 132 Frost courses and 141 CoGS courses.  This year we expect another 17% increase. Online courses will be an important component in our strategic initiatives in the coming years.  Greater numbers of students are enrolling in the Frost School and in CoGS and are expecting fully online courses and programs.  As you know, we are migrating over to Moodle from Blackboard as our Learning Management System.  The feedback from students and faculty who have already implemented the change has been very positive with both groups finding the system more intuitive and user friendly.

This Fall and in the Spring we will be piloting a new online course evaluation tool called CoursEval.  For more information about this tool, contact Ellen Murphy in the Office of Online Education.

More info here –>http://www.academicmanagement.com/products/course_eval.php

 

NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Art

  • Three works by Liz D’Amico are included in the WCA/NH juried exhibit currently on view at Silver Culture Center:  A Passion for Sewing, a box assemblage honoring her mother, The Crossroad, a collage based on her mother’s wartime experiences and Mending Humanity a collage hinting at what women know.  Mending Humanity will also be part of the National Collage Society’s (NSC) 26th Annual Juried Exhibition making D’Amico a Signature Member of NCS. For the first time this year, the exhibit will be posted online.
  • On Saturday, October 30, Lauren Dadmun joined about 25 other New Hampshire Potters for the New Hampshire Potters Guild annual Potters Market at the Holiday Inn in Concord (just off Exit 14).
  • Afterschool Arts is currently offering two classes for 32 area school children in grades K-6 at the D&M Building on Monday and Wednesday afternoons.  The program continues to grow and meet the educational needs of highly motivated children from the Plymouth region.  This semester, we have a new teacher, Marylena Sevigney who is teaching “Picturing Books: Storytelling and Artmaking” that integrates stories, children’s literature, book making and visual art exploration.   Afterschool Arts is an ongoing arts education program at Plymouth State University and an arts advocacy initiative for Plymouth area school children providing high quality, affordable art making enrichment activities presented in partnership with Plymouth Park & Rec/A+ Programs.  Spring Afterschool classes will begin in March and plans are being made for a summer children’s art camp.
  • Jason Swift presented a paper titled The Artist/(Auto)Ethnographer: Navigating, Negotiating and Balancing the Dialogue, Opposition and Conflict of Being the Researcher and Research Subject Simultaneously at the SECAC/MACAA joint conference in Richmond, VA.

Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry

  • The Department of Atmospheric Science and Chemistry had three booths at the New Hampshire TechFest in Windham on Saturday Oct. 23rd from 9 am – 3 pm.  The TechFest is a festival of science and technology providing hands on learning opportunities for middle and high school students to encourage them to pursue careers in the STEM disciplines. Dennis Machnik gave continuous Planetarium shows in the portable planetarium, while Sally Jensen had information available about NASA space flights and educational programs. Jeremiah Duncan and four undergraduate students (Patrick Gile, Katie Hills-Kimball, Andrew Hornberger, and Marc Tahtamoni), had several chemistry experiments for participants including: “alchemy” of pennies and making liquid crystal displays (LCD’s). Lastly, Eric Hoffman, Brendon Hoch and three graduate students (Bonnie Anderson, Nick Kyper, and Derek Mallia) had a display with three dimensional weather visualization software and led students through the interactive “human sling psychrometer” experiment.
  • On October 22, 2010, Anil Waghe and Marguerite Crowell, along with chemistry majors, visited Plymouth Elementary School for their sixth annual “chemistry week” presentation. Activities that they presented to the sixth grade included making “artificial snow” and “crystal mountain,” both based on the theme “behind the scenes with chemistry!”

Biological Sciences

  • Katie Rose Boissonneault and Chris Chabot received over $1.2 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health INBRE program to fund faculty-mentored undergraduate research in their laboratories.  Chabot and his students will investigate the molecular mechanisms of circadian and circatidal clocks, how multiple clocks are coordinated, and what substances might mediate the influences of clocks on various behavioral and physiological functions.  Boissonneault’s work will focus on developing gene transfer protocols in the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries in order to facilitate characterization of the genes involved in biosynthesis of the neurotoxin, domoic acid.
  • Len Reitsma and collaborators from The Nature Conservancy and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center recently published a paper in the journal Ecology based upon three years of studying a population of Northern Waterthrushes in Puerto Rico.  Smith, J. A. M., L. R. Reitsma and P. P. Marra,  2010: Moisture as a determinant of habitat quality for a nonbreeding Neotropical migratory songbird,  Ecology 91: 2874-2882). This is the second publication from this three-year study.

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • Fran Belcher and Thad Guldbrandsen presented, “Developing a Regional Engagement Model for Small Rural Universities” at the National Outreach Scholarship Conference in Raleigh, NC (10/5/10).
  • Thad Guldbrandsen was the keynote speaker at the Annual General Meeting of the Alberta Rural Development Network in Canada (10/14/10).  The title of his talk was “Building a Network and Enhancing a Region.”
  • Thad Guldbrandsen presented on “The Northern Forest Higher Education Network” in Watertown, NY (10/25/10) and Paul Smith’s College (10/26/10).  He was part of a panel that included Sandy Blitz (Federal Co-Chair of the Northern Borders Commission), Joe Short (Northern Forest Center), and other regional leaders.
  • “The Community Roadmap to Renewable Biomass Energy” was released at the end of October.  This community decision-making tool is a product of two years of collaboration among the Center for Rural Partnerships, North Country RC&D, Coös Economic Development Corporation, the Northern Forest Center, and others.  Tom Evans is graduate assistant on the project working under the direction of Thad Guldbrandsen.
  • Funding for the PSU-Coös County Outreach Initiative was renewed (for two more years) by the Neil & Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.

College of Business Administration

  • Yvette Lazdowski attended the Northeast Regional meeting of the American Accounting Association in Burlington, Vermont, where she presented a paper titled “A Historical View of Management Accounting in the Early Years of Ford Motor Company”.
  • Christina Bradbury presented a paper titled “The Prosper Credit Risk Rating System: Does It Improve Market Decision-Making Efficacy?” at the 70th International Atlantic Economic Society conference held Oct. 10-13 in Charleston, SC.
  • Brad Allen, along with twenty-three Plymouth State American Marketing Association (AMA) students traveled to the Balsam’s Resort as guests of Mr. Rick McCarten, Director of Sales, on October 14th.  The event was designed to be the fall team-building event for the AMA. The students created a formal business etiquette dinner where they discussed appropriate professional behavior while at a business function.  Professor Allen discussed how social events, such as taking a client to dinner, an athletic event, or other social occasion, represent opportunities to build relationships in business that often last for years.The students enjoyed dressing up and practicing the suggested professional behaviors of successful business social events.  In addition, the students were able to tour the facility and gain an appreciation for the history of the Balsam’s as they visited many of the hidden treasures presented throughout the property.

Education

  • Pat Cantor presented on “Supporting Preschool English Language Learners” at the Early Learning New Hampshire Conference in Manchester on October 16.  On the 22nd, she presented on “Teaching and Learning about Constructivism” at the annual conference of the Association for Constructivist Teaching in Chicago.  This session highlighted the work she and Mary Cornish have done in developing the early childhood course, The Constructivist Approach in Early Care and Education, at PSU.
  • Susan Shapiro presented a full-day workshop titled, “Differentiated Instruction in the Inclusive Classroom,” to teachers statewide, on October 26, 2010, in Concord.
  • Clarissa M. Uttley, along with two undergraduate students (Denise Sprague-Colcord and Nicole Skelton) presented at the Early Learning New Hampshire conference in Manchester, NH on October 16, 2010.  Their presentation on Therapy Animals in the Early Childhood Classroom was attended by 33 early childhood educators and administrators.
  • Kathleen Norris participated in the NH IHE network of institutions concerned with the Summit on 21st Century Teaching and Learning as part of her work on the State of NH Professional Standards Board and Subcommittee work on the ED600’s which concern teacher preparation program approval.

English

  • Liz Ahl had two poems published in the latest issue of The Salt River Review:  (http://www.poetserv.org/SRR38/srr38_39_contents.html).
  • Art Fried presentated “Jack Kirby and the Creation of the DC Comics Brand” at the Northeast Popular Culture Association annual meeting in Boston on 10/23
  • The film that Scott Coykendall wrote, “Our Secret Season,” won the El Capitan Film Award at the 2010 Yosemite Film Festival in October. It was also pre-selected as a “must see film” at the 2010 SNOB Film Festival in Concord. The SNOB schedule has not been announced, but the festival runs November 26-28.

Health and Human Performance

  • Linda Levy, assisted by undergraduate and entry-level graduate athletic training students, provided a workshop on “Rescue Techniques: An Evidence-based Approach to Ice Related Injuries” for local EMT’s on 10/4.  Held at the ice arena, the rescue personnel learned how to care for ankle, shoulder and spinal cord injuries.
  • Students Courtney Lecours, Joey Ellis, and Amanda Pierson participated in the Student Leadership Conference at the Stony Acres Environment Center on the East Stroudsburg State University Campus over Columbus Day weekend.  The Conference was co-sponsored by the Pennsylvania State Association AHPERD and EDA/AAHPERD.
  • Barbara McCahan’s and Margie King’s grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health INBRE program was funded.  The grant will fund the following project: Reliability of Center of Foot Pressure as a Predictor of Falls Risk, Balance, Functional Fitness, and Fear of Falling with Older Adults

History and Philosophy

  • Whitney Howarth’s article “Advocates and Arbiters: Travancore and Mysore Missionaries as Public Petitioners and Champions of Social Justice (1806-1886)” was published in Journal of Postcolonial Theory and Theology. You can access this article at:  www.postcolonialjournal.com and click on Articles

Library and Academic Support Services

  • David A. Beronä published the “Introduction” to George Walker’s Book of Hours: A Tragic New York Novel Told With 99 Wood Engravings. Porcupine’s Quill Press, October, 2010 and presented a paper, “Humor, Play, and Identity in Comics: Reading Wordless Comics,” on October 14, 2010 at 2010 Festival of Cartoon Art, Ohio State University.
  • Elaine S. Allard presented a case study on the Lamson Learning Commons at the Super-Convergence – an exchange of experience conference on October 7, 2010 at Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, England.

Mathematics

  • John Donovan presented a seminar titled: “The Non-Content Half of Mathematics” to students and faculty on October 13.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Kathleen Arecchi served as an adjudicator for the Granite State NATS Musical Theatre Singing Competition in Concord on October 31.
  • Gary Corcoran was the guest conductor for an Invitational Honor Band at Hollis-Brookline High School on October 16.
  • Holly Oliver recently served on the NH Department of Education Teacher Preparation Review Team examining the music education teacher preparation program at a New Hampshire university.
  • During October, Dan Perkins performed a concert with his Trio Veritas at Harvard, performed as collaborative pianist in a recital with baritone Steven Small, spent a week in Ireland planning a future performance/study tour, and while there, ran the Dublin Marathon.
  • Jonathan Santore wrote the Foreword for Principles and Practice of Modal Counterpoint, by Douglass Green and Evan Jones, published in October by Routledge.

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin attended his first half-day meeting as a member of the Council on Leadership Development at the annual CSWE conference held in Portland, Oregon, and moderated a break-out session at the Council-sponsored Networking Reception at the conference. He also co-led the NH Chapter new board orientation with the chapter President.
  • Scott Meyer co-chaired a meeting of New England Regional Field Coordinators meeting in MA.
  • Cynthia Moniz published “Social Work and the Social Determinants of Health Perspective: A Good Fit”, Health & Social Work, November 2010, 35(4). She attended her first half-day meeting as a newly appointed Commissioner of CSWE’s Commission on Professional Development at the annual CSWE conference held in Portland, Oregon. She also participated in the NH Chapter new board orientation.

Teacher Certification

  • Irene Cucina (HHP), Gerry Buteau (Education), Holly Oliver (Music, Theatre, and Dance), Christie Sweeney (College of Graduate Studies), and Cynthia Vascek (Art Education) were part of a 27 person team representing the New Hampshire Department of Education to review the teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs at a New Hampshire univeristy, October 3-6.
  • Irene Cucina (HHP) was the keynote speaker at the Georgia Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance annual convention in Savannah, GA.

 

 

 

October 2010

June 28th, 2011 by gbeckwith

Monthly Report to the Faculty

Provost Julie Bernier

October 1, 2010

 

Statewide initiative on College Readiness

The College and Career-Ready Educational Summit was held on 9/22 in the Hage Room on the PSU campus.  This was the first of five regional meetings to be held around the state this fall and was co-hosted by USNH, the NH Department of Education, and the New England Secondary School Consortium (NESSC). High school teachers and administrators as well as college faculty were invited to attend. PSU’s Natalya Vinogradova (Math), Meg Petersen (English), Dick Evans (Math), Meagan Shedd (Education), Terri Dautcher (CoBA), Mary Ann McGarry (Environmental Science and Policy)and Jane Weber (Writing Center) attended the Summit.

 

NEASC

Plymouth State University began planning for our next NEASC accreditation process with a kick-off meeting on September 24th.  While there are still a few subcommittee (Chapter) positions to fill, the following individuals met to begin the work that will take place over the next 2-3 years leading up to our 2013 visit: Nancy Betchart, Committee Chair; Sylvia Bryant, Chapter 1, Mission and Purposes; Irene Cucina, Scott Mantie, Dan Moore, Chapter 2, Planning and Evaluation; Scott Coykendall, additional PAT and OS to be added, Chapter 3, Organization and Governance; David Zehr, George Tuthill, Wendy Palmquist, Chapter 4, The Academic Program; Julie Bernier, Gail Mears, Sam Miller, Becky Noel, Chapter  5, Faculty; Rick Barth, additional OS, PAT, student members to be added, Chapter 6, Students; David Beronä, Chapter 7, Library and other Information Resources; Steve Taksar, Linda Dauer, Ann Thurston, Laurie Wilcox, Chapter 9, Financial Resources; Steve Barba and Tim Kershner Chapter 10, Public Disclosure; Annette Holba, Chapter 11, Integrity.

 

 

NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Art

  • Jason Swift was elected President of the Board of Trustees of Friends of the Arts and also was accepted to, and received a partial fellowship to attend the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, VT.  Jason’s artwork is included in the exhibition “Boundaries and Borders” at the 2010 International Outdoor Exhibition of DMZ Art Festival at the Seokjang-ri Art Gallery in South Korea.
  • Mixed media sculptures, paintings, prints and collages by Liz D’Amico will remain on view through 10/7 at the Galletly Gallery in the Moore Center at the New Hampton School as a solo exhibit entitled “Fantasy Worlds – Timely Messages.”   Gallery hours are 8am – 4pm M – F and 8am – Noon on Saturday.
  • Annette Mitchell exhibited her works at the International Fiber Collaborative Show, Mulberry Street Library, New York, NY (9/1-11/1), the Four Legged Exhibition, Mill Brook Gallery, Concord, NY (Sept/Nov),  Corsets/Breastplates Exhibition, Blue Velvet Gallery, Mobile, AL (9/10-30), and she gave a Workshop, “Printing on Fabric,” at Fiber Divas, Holderness, NH (9/25).

Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry

  • In Spring 2007 Adjunct Faculty Thomas Morin (astronomy) and, then undergraduate, Jennifer Jones participated in the International Asteroid Search Campaign and made a number of discoveries.  In the intervening years, these discoveries were observed by the sky surveys with additional measurements allowing for the refinement of their orbits.  The orbits are now sufficiently known to the point that the Minor Planet Center (Harvard) has officially numbered and catalogued these asteroids (2007 DB85 (185484)).  Thomas and Jennifer may now suggest a name to the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as this body has the final authority on the names of all minor planets.   Jennifer is now employed at the Christa McAullife- Alan Shepard Discovery Center as their Marketing Coordinator.
  • On 6/22, Jeremiah Duncan spoke before a meeting of Environment and Agriculture Committee of the House of Representatives in New Hampshire as part of the Committee’s review of NH HB 1456–a bill that would consider banning use of pesticides in areas where children play or congregate.  He also was co-author of a manuscript that was published in June:  Sharp, C.R., Duncan, J.S., Lee, S.C. “[Fe 4 S 4] q Cubane Clusters (q = 4+, 3+, 2+) with Terminal Amide Ligands, ” Inorg. Chem. , 49 :6697-6705 (2010).
  • In July, Jeremiah Duncan and Marguerite Crowell were instructors in the Pakistani Educators Leadership Institute, co-teaching an Environmental Education course with a focus on International Watersheds with faculty from ES&P and CFE.

Biological Sciences

  • Chris Chabot had two papers published in the journal Current Zoology: “High resolution tracking of adult horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus in a New Hampshire estuary using fixed array ultrasonic telemetry” by W. H. Watson and C. C. Chabot; and “Seasonal movements of American horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus in the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire (USA)” by S.Y. Schaller, C.C. Chabot and W.H. Watson.  Both articles are available online now (http://www.actazool.org/index.asp) and will appear in print in October (Vol. 56).
  • Kerry Yurewicz and undergraduate biology student Jacquelyn Huckins led volunteer stream monitoring events at a total of six sites in Plymouth, Rumney, and Holderness in September.

Center for the Environment

  • Brian Eisenhauer was recently appointed interim director of the Center for the Environment and June Hammond Rowan has been appointed interim associate director.
  • Lisa Doner, research assistant professor at the Center for the Environment, was recently awarded a $600,000 National Science Foundation grant to study the deposits in the bottom of lakes in Iceland and how the North Atlantic Oscillation affects the process of deposition. The North Atlantic Oscillation and a related, larger circulation pattern called the Arctic Oscillation, controls most of the Northern Hemisphere’s year-to-year atmospheric variation. From 2010-2014, Lisa will head a team of researchers to investigate this phenomenon, including Mark Green, Assistant Professor of Hydrology at the Center for the Environment, and others from the University of Maine, University of Colorado, and Salem State College. Each year, a PSU graduate student and two undergraduate students will travel to Iceland, Maine and Minnesota to collect and analyze samples. The students will also have the opportunity to report their results at national science meetings.
  • Research assistant professor Doug Earick, in collaboration with PSU’s Department of Education’s Early Childhood Program, has received a Mathematics & Science Partnership grant from the NH Department of Education for a project on Teacher as Researcher: The role of inquiry, and learning progressions through environmental science studies. Over the next year, this $75,000 grant will focus on teacher professional development for up to thirty K-5 teachers from the Newfound School District in the use of inquiry in science education utilizing the field of environmental studies.
  • Aaron Johnson, senior laboratory technician, has been working with the NH Department of Environmental Services on expanding the state’s Volunteer Lake Assessment Program in the North Country. The efforts have paid off and this year, volunteers have brought samples from eight new lakes to the Center’s Environmental Research Laboratory resulting in more monitoring data that is used by the state in meeting its requirements of the Clean Water Act.
  • The Center has concluded its third year of its NSF funded Research Experience for Undergraduates at Hubbard Brook program. During the summer, students come from around the country for 10 weeks to participate in research projects at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in Thornton. Geoff Wilson, Mary Ann McGarry, Doug Earick, Michele Pruyn, and Mark Green have all had major roles in this program through leading the overall organization, conducting science communication workshops, and serving as mentors for research projects.
  • Hydrologist Mark Green presented a cyberseminar on 10/1 for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI). Mark’s talk was on “Extracting characteristic hydrologic patterns from many catchments: the case of stream water total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios.”
  • Brian Eisenhauer co-presented a workshop at the Non-point Education for Municipal Officials conference in Maine. The workshop was on “Shake Up Your Work with Social Science” and it was designed to help participants choose the right social science frameworks, methods and partners to answer your human dimensions questions.   Brian also recently spoke about the Center for the Environment at a gathering of town conservation commissions.
  • Come join us for our fall colloquium! Each Wednesday afternoon from 4-5 pm the Center for the Environment hosts a speaker for our colloquium series in room 001 of the Boyd Science Center. The talks cover a wide range of topics around environmental science and sustainability. For more information, contact Angela Uhlman. A list of speakers is posted at http://www.plymouth.edu/center-for-the-environment/1201/fall-colloquium/.
  • The 2nd NH Water and Watershed Conference will be held on 3/25 & 26, 2011 at Plymouth State University. The Center for the Environment is a sponsor and host of the conference. The call for abstracts is available and abstracts are due 10/29. For more information, contact June Hammond Rowan.

 

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • Making $ense New England, a two-year project culminating in a 10-part financial awareness series intended “to help communities respond to northern New England’s economic challenges,” came to a close.  Thad Guldbrandsen was a member of the project advisory board; he said that the first-ever collaboration between public television stations in different states and focused use of interactive web communications opportunities (i.e. YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) are crucial initiatives for PBS, and that the outcomes exceeded expectations.  In NH, viewership was above normal and one of the segments was featured on the national PBS NewsHour in August.  The series will repeat beginning Saturday, 10/3, at 2pm.  For more information: www.makingsensene.org
  • The September edition of the North Country Economic Index is available: www.plymouth.edu/ncei
  • Thad Guldbrandsen and Ben Amsden presented their original research on the “Economic Assessment of Grafton County, NH” at the Grafton County Economic Development Council board meeting.
  • In collaboration with faculty members from across campus, the Center for Rural Partnerships hosted Commissioner Wrenn and other administrators from the NH Dept. of Corrections (NHDOC) to discuss future collaboration between PSU and NHDOC.  Please contact CRP, if you would like to get involved.

College of Business Administration

  • Yvette Lazdowski attended a national conference of the American Accounting Association last August in San Francisco where she presented a paper, “A Historical View of Management Accounting at Ford Motor Company.”

Communication and Media Studies

  • In July, Cathie LeBlanc traveled to Washington DC to review and make recommendations concerning funding proposals for the National Science Foundation’s “Broadening Participation in Computing” program.  In addition, she served as a workshop reviewer for the upcoming Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education Conference.

Counseling Education and School Psychology

  • Celia Gibbs was awarded the Outstanding Site Supervisor Award at the North Atlantic Region Association for Counselor Education and Supervision held in New Brunswick, NJ in September. Celia’s dedication to supervision and clinical excellence and the way this benefits our mental health students were commended by department chair, Gail Mears.

Criminal Justice

  • David Mackey with Kevin Courtright and Susan Packard, both of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, presented “Selecting probation, the big house, or something in between: First year college students rate the appropriateness of criminal sanctions for specific crime scenarios” at the annual meeting of the Southern Criminal Justice Association.
  • The 2nd Biannual Conference on Integral Theory has chosen Mark Fischler’s paper on rape and the death penalty as one of the Best of the Best. The best papers will be published in an upcoming “Best of the Conference” issue of the Journal of Integral Theory and Review.   Mark also had a recent meeting in Denver, Colorado with American philosopher and author Ken Wilber about articulating an integral theory of justice in response to John Rawls’ theory of justice.

Education

  • Alyssa Satas, one of our former students and currently a sixth grade teacher at Plymouth Elementary School, and Gerry Buteau presented at the NE Reading Association Annual Conference held in Nashua.  They presented on their development and implementation of the Family Writing Project, a part of One Book, One Community, which is an annual event held in the town of Moultonborough, NH. In addition, 9 childhood studies students attended the Conference.  They worked as conference volunteers, attended several sessions and met several of the presenters, one of whom wrote the textbook they are currently reading in their Foundations of Reading and Writing Class.
  • Marcel Lebrun presented at the conference Transforming Troubled Lives at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. The presentation was entitled “School Shooter: Monsters or Victims.” The presentation was very well received. He has been invited to transform the power point into a chapter of an edited book by renowned expert Dr. John Visser of the University of Birmingham on Severe Emotional Behaviors in Adolescents.
  • Kathleen Norris is presenting on “The Evaluation of a New Doctoral Program” at the National Evaluation Institute CREATE conference in October and on “Using Symbol and Metaphor to Engage an Arts Organization in Evaluation” at the American Evaluation Association Annual Conference in November.  She has also been included in the Energy Star “Tell Us How You Save” website.
  • Meagan Shedd has accepted an invitation for a three-year term for the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s Teaching Young Children Editorial Advisory Panel. Just prior to her move to NH, Meagan authored The Michigan Reads! Programming Guide (which has been published and distributed to public libraries, school libraries, and Head Start classrooms across Michigan.  A link to the guide can be found at http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-54574_26038—,00.html.
  • Mary Earick has been appointed to the NH Task Force on Effective Teaching and the Urban Education Reviewing Panel.

Environmental Science and Policy

  • MAT  science education graduate assistants, Melissa Peplinski and Tess Finnigan-Allen, attended NH Focus on ePortfolio Day, 10/4 with Mary Ann McGarry.  Pictured below are Ellen Murphy, Mary Ann McGarry, Melissa Peplinski, and Tess Finnigan-Allen.
  • Mary Ann McGarry was a co-author of “The role of interface organizations in science communication and understanding,” DL Osmond et al., August, published in the journal, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment; http://www.frontiersinecology.org/current_issue/augustContents2010.pdf.
  • Mary Ann McGarry, Brian Eisenhauer (CFE/SS), and Tom Boucher (MA), and Andy Timmins (of UNF & G) served on the thesis committee of ES and P graduate student Katie Callahan, a NH Department of Environmental Services GIS specialist who presented on “Estimating Fine-Scale Movement Patterns of Black Bear using GPS Telemetry”, research related to nuisance black bear populations in northern NH
  • Mary Ann McGarry, Tom Shevenell (PSU adjunct), Steve Kahl (former Director of CFE), and Jess Schloss (UNH) served on the thesis committee of ES and P graduate student, Rebecca Harvey, who focused on, “Establishing a method to detect pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in Central New Hampshire, US: a pilot study.”  A white paper on Harvey’s research testing for pharmaceutical’s in fresh water systems in NH, including Squam Lake, has already been published by the Squam Lakes Association.  Harvey presented Pharmeceuticals and Personal Care Products: exploring their occurrence and effects in the environment, for the 40 Pakistani Educational Leaders on campus in July during the International Watersheds week long course.

Frost School

  • The Frost School community education program is celebrating the 25th season of Manuel Sterling’s popular course, “Are You Afraid of Opera?”  This course has been enjoyed by faculty, and community members throughout the years. The last class day, 11/10, will be a celebration including the screening of a full length opera at The Flying Monkey.

Global Education

  • In continuing our efforts to develop and enhance global partnerships, in September GEO hosted visitors from England and New Zealand:  Dr. Alasdair Spark is the Director of Internationalization at the University of Winchester, U.K and Amy Rutherford is the International Marketing Manager for the University of Otago in Dunedin.  In spring 2011, we will launch a program with the University of Otago designed for students majoring in Geography, Environmental Science and Policy, and Environmental Planning.  Thanks to Professors Middlekauff, Tomkiewicz and Turski for collaborating with GEO on this project.
  • PSU was among a select group of universities (the only one in NH) invited to participate in Michigan State University’s annual college recruiting survey of employers, Recruiting Trends. GEO contacted 2366 employers in our database to gather information for the report which will be published in November.
  • Yuefan Hou has joined GEO as adjunct staff assisting our international student population.

Health and Human Performance

  • Linda Levy, assisted by undergraduate and entry-level graduate athletic training students, hosted a workshop titled “Rescue Techniques Clinic: An Evidence-based Approach to Ice Related Injuries” for local EMT’s on 10/4.  Held at the ice arena, the rescue personnel learned how to care for ankle, shoulder and spinal cord injuries.

History and Philosophy

  • David F. Haight has been notified that his second paper on the Riemann Hypothesis millennium problem has been accepted for publication in The Journal of Interdisciplinary Mathematics.  This paper is entitled “Generalizing Riemann: From the L-functions to the Birch/Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture.”
  • Marcia Schmidt Blaine’s article, “Mere Trade or Learned Profession?  Medical Practice in Dover, 1780-1850,” was published in the summer issue of Historical New Hampshire.
  • Marcia Schmidt Blaine wrote an article that was published in the summer 2010 New Hampshire Bar Journal titled “A Public Trust: Laws, Liquor, Disorder, and Women.”

Languages and Linguistics

  • Barbara Lopez-Mayhew and Dr. Jonathan Higgins (Chinese instructor) completed the EdTech Leaders Online Program’s Course Design Course, developed by the Education Development Center’s Center for Online Professional Education. Through this asynchronous online course,  Barbara and Jonathan engaged in active training to learn online curriculum design, explored theories of online learning and effective curriculum development, and participated in the development of an online course – Development of a Foreign Language Thematic Unit.
  • Barbara Lopez-Mayhew participated in a development review of the Spanish textbook Puentes y barreras for CENGAGE Learning.
  • Barbara Lopez-Mayhew and Mary Ann McGarry (ESP) traveled to Chile, in June, as part of an eight-member delegation from USNH institutions.  The delegation undertook a site visit to Chile to explore areas for collaboration and with special focus on the themes of sustainability, teacher education, and agriculture with Chilean universities. Members of the delegation also included:  Stephen Reno, Chancellor Emeritus; Thomas Davis, Professor of Biological Sciences,  (UNH),Thomas Kelly, Chief Sustainability Officer and Director of the University Office of Sustainability (UNH); Skye Stephenson, Director, Global Education Office (KSC) and Melinda D. Treadwell, Dean of Professional and Graduate Studies (KSC). There were additional opportunities identified for collaboration between the USNH institutions and the Chilean Ministry of Education in the areas of (1) student and faculty mobility, (2) strengthening research capability, (3) promoting sustainability, and (4) enhancing educational training and pedagogy, particularly in ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages).
  • James Whiting recently served as a Discipline Reviewer in Applied Linguistics for the 2010 Fulbright Scholar Program.  His article, “Key Behaviors of Successful College ELLs,” was recently published in Idiom v. 40 n. 3, fall 2010.

Library and Academic Support Services’

  • Alice Staples was awarded a Conservation License Plate grant for $6,247 for Brown Company Photograph Preservation.
  • Ellen Marie Murphy presented: “Moodle 2.0 rollout considerations”  2-3-98 Conference, State University of New York at Delhi in August.
  • David A. Beronä was the curator of the exhibit, Graphic Novels in the Purest Sense, Edwards Art Gallery, Holderness School, 9/17-10/23.  He was also interviewed at this event by NHPR: http://www.nhpr.org/wordless-books.
  • Jen Green presented at the NH Archives Group Fall 2010 Workshop in September.  The presentation was entitled: “Designing Workflow for Digitization Projects.”
  • Ellen Marie Murphy was a Conference Organizer/Host at NERCOMP Sig “Open Source ePortfolios” 9/20 and presented: “Creating an Environment That Supports ePortfolios Across the Curriculum” NERCOMP Sig on Open Source ePortfolios.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Elizabeth Cox is co-directing theatre’s October production, “Still Life with Iris” with PSU alum Christopher Robin Marcotte (’00).  Robin is currently the Managing Director of the Philadelphia School of Circus Arts.  Beth has also worked with Friends of the Arts to produce a school bus-in matinee performance.
  • Kathleen Arecchi has been selected to serve as Chair of the Strategic Planning Committee for the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS).
  • Rik Pfenninger has now signed with Pump Audio in LA to carry his orchestral and jazz tracks.
  • Jonathan Santore’s composition Kalevala Fragments was performed by the University of Minnesota Singers at the 2010 National Conference of the College Music Society in Minneapolis.
  • Robert Swift’s article “Old Files” has been published in the music education journals of three New England states — Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

Pakistani Institute

  • The Pakistani Educational Leadership Project is now focused on its Pakistan phase, with project director Blake Allen working with the in-country team. With the completion of the 2010 institute, an ongoing assessment and evaluation of the institute is taking place with contributions from the 40 delegates, the project team in the U.S. and Pakistan, institute instructors, and external evaluators from Lesley University.  The delegates also are preparing to implement Master Action Plans (MAP) that they designed and developed during the institute. Their MAPS are posted on the project blog: http://pelinstitute.org.  As challenges in Pakistan continue, the delegates will further refine their MAPS in response to complex and variable conditions.

Planning also is underway by Allen and the in-country team for Federal Fiscal Year 2010 phases in Pakistan and the U.S. With State Department funding secured through March 2012, the project will select another 40 delegates from each Pakistan province and Pakistan-administered area to participate in a summer 2011 institute housed at PSU.  By project alumni request, the core areas to be addressed will continue in educational leadership, conflict resolution, and environmental education.

Allen continues to participate in seminars and discussion groups at Harvard Kennedy School.  Fatima Bhutto of Pakistan’s Bhutto political “dynasty” recently initiated a lively discussion on long term strategies for stabilizing the country.  Foremost amongst the recommendations was a focus on addressing critical and ignored grassroots needs in education.  The project’s 160 alumni represent the remarkable agents of change that do exist in the education sector – the grassroots voices.

Many of the project alumni have been involved in flood relief initiatives and in refugee support, with 20 million Pakistanis now displaced from their communities due to wide-spread devastation. Some of the inspirational alumni efforts are posted on the project blog. At PSU, senior Bryan Funk and junior Sam Wisel are developing a fund raiser for the Pakistani alumni who are involved with flood relief.

Psychology

  • John Kulig and Aditi Grover (CoBA) co-presented a research poster entitled “Unhealthy Life-Style Behaviors Produce More False Consensus than Healthy Behaviors” at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Psychological Science in Boston, MA.

Social Science

  • Bryon Middlekauff had a book review published in the Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Map Society. The book reviewed was by J. Robson.  “Captain Cook’s War and Peace: the Royal Navy Years, 1755-1768,” University of New South Wales Press, Sydney, 2009.
  • Mark Okrant (Institute for New Hampshire Studies), in collaboration with Ben Amsden and Thad Guldbrandsen (Center for Rural Partnerships), assisted the State Division of Travel and Tourism Development in creating a website designed to promote a 1950s/60s Retrotour along Route 3. The site can be viewed at http://www.visitnh.gov/uploads/itineraries/retro-tour.pdf.
  • David Starbuck and some of the students from his Introduction to Archaeology class have commenced a small excavation behind (east of) Holmes House, hoping to find artifacts and features from the early years of the house’s use.  Holmes House is one of the oldest buildings on the PSU campus, originally built for Holmes Plymouth Academy, and students hope to demonstrate archaeologically the very historic nature of the PSU campus.  They already have found many shards of pottery (redware, whiteware and pearlware), cut nails, brick fragments, a button, and even part of the stem from a tobacco pipe.  Students, faculty and staff are all encouraged to “stop by” whenever you see the archaeological team out there in late afternoons!

 

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin worked as a member of the NH State Committee on Aging to assist the department in co-sponsoring a 9/23 forum on working with returning veterans, “Community Connections to Assist Veterans,” held on campus in Heritage Commons. Approximately 90 participants from across the state were in attendance; NH-NASW offered CEUs for clinical practitioners.  http://www.plymouth.edu/news/fullstory.php?number=6906.  He also participated in a national meeting of the Publications Committee, NASW, as Editor-in-Chief of Health & Social Work.
  • Scott Meyer is now serving as Vice Chair, NH Commission on the Status of Men.  During Faculty Week, he co-presented “Disturbing the Classroom Peace” with Leo Sandy (CE/SP), one of our majors, Sarah Silvia, and graduate student Jodi Bartley.
  • Cynthia Moniz was accepted for inclusion in the 2011 Who’s Who in America.
  • Christine Rine participated in a meeting of the NH-DCYF Council on Organizational Leadership and attended the President’s annual dinner with our partnership award students to honor students and their sponsors.

Writing Center

  • Jane Weber organized the College and Career-Ready Educational Summit that was held on the PSU campus on 9/22.

 

September 2010

June 28th, 2011 by gbeckwith

Monthly Report to the Faculty

Provost Julie Bernier

September 1, 2010

 

 

 

Welcome back everyone.   Congratulations on a very successful Faculty Week and thank you to all the presenters.

 

Please join us today to celebrate with your colleagues as we announce the 2010 Award for Excellence in Faculty Service and the 2010 Distinguished Scholarship Award recipient.

 

NEASC EdD

This week the Education Department and College of Graduate Studies submitted their report to NEASC for the upcoming focused visit in response to PSU’s “move to the higher degree” (i.e. offering the doctorate).  The report was prepared by a team of individuals, led by the EdD Coordinator, Kathleen Norris and included the Interim Associate Vice President for the College of Graduate Studies, George Tuthill; Dean of the Frost School and PSU’s NEASC Liaison, Nancy Betchart; Chair of Education Department, Marcel Lebrun; Dean of the Library and Academic Support Services, David Beronä; and Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Julie Bernier.  The NEASC external site visit team will be on campus in early October to review PSU’s implementation of the EdD in Learning Leadership and Community.

 

NCATE

All teacher certification programs are currently collecting data and are in the process or preparing documentation for our upcoming NCATE visit.  My sincere thanks to all of you who have committed countless hours to this process.  Special congratulations to Physical Education, the first of our programs to be nationally recognized!

 

Carnegie Community Engagement Elective Classification

A number of colleagues have spent the better part of the summer and more intensively over the last few weeks putting the finishing touches on the application to Carnegie for the Community Engagement Elective Classification. In late spring, Daniel Moore, Scott Mantie and I met with Co-Chairs of the Service Learning Task Force, Terri Dautcher and Ben Amsden to review the application process and to develop a plan for its completion.

 

Elective classifications, such as this for community engagement, involve data collection and documentation “with substantial effort invested by participating institutions.” Elective classifications enable recognition of an institution for an aspect of its mission that is not usually recognized in the classification systems such as “Masters-Large,” our basic Carnegie Classification.  The Community Engagement Classification recognizes institutions for “the collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.” http://classifications.carnegiefoundation.org

 

Special thanks to Daniel, Terri and Ben for their work on the application process.

 

 


 

NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

 

Art

  • Elizabeth D’Amico had a solar print with Chinecollé in “Momenta IV” at Two Rivers Printmaking in White River Junction, VT.  The show was juried by Cynthia Reeves and was up through July 31st.  Elizabeth also had one of her box assemblages and a collage accepted for “Shine,” a WCA juried show at the Bromfield Gallery in Boston from August 4 – 21.
  • Cynthia Vascak’s figurative monoprint, “Morning Light and Shadow Song” was accepted into the National Juried Monotype and Monoprint Exhibition, juried by Joann Moser, Senior Curator, Graphic Arts, Smithsonian American Art Museum.  The Exhibition will be at the Fitchburg Art Museum, September 26-Jan.2.  Opening Reception will be September 26, 1-3pm.  Link to exhibition information http://mgne.org/
  • Adjunct Faculty Henrieke I. Streker, was a Prize Winner in the STILL IN MOTION – THE INTERNATIONAL PINHOLE PHOTO CONTEST 2010: http://www.stillinmotionfestival.com/crbst_7.html

Front: Frankfurter Hauptbahnhof [Frankfurt (Main) Central Station], opened August 18, 1888

Back: MesseTurm, Groundbreaking July 13, 1988, opening October 1990

Athletics

  • ECAC award:  Four distinguished sports information professionals, one media member and a standout college senior intent on an athletic communications career were honored Thursday, June 10, as recipients of the 2010 ECAC-SIDA (Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Sports Information Directors Association) top awards.  The Irving T. Marsh Service Bureau Award (College Division) was presented to Kent Cherrington.

Biological Sciences

  • Chris Chabot and his colleague Win Watson published an article entitled “Circatidal rhythms of locomotion in the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus: Underlying mechanisms and cues that influence them” in the journal Current Zoology.   The article is available online now (http://www.actazool.org/index.asp) and will appear in print in October 2010 (vol. 56).
  • Brigid O’Donnell and her colleague Elizabeth Jockusch published an article entitled “The expression of wingless and Engrailed in developing embryos of the mayfly, Ephoron leukon (Ephemeroptera: Polymitarcyidae)” in the journal Development, Genes and Evolution (vol. 220, June 2010).
  • Michele Pruyn gave presentations at two scientific meetings on research done in collaboration with recent biology graduate Maegan Gagne (BS Environmental Biology 2010):  “Water properties of yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) along an elevation gradient on Mt. Kineo” (IAWA, IAWS & IUFRO Conference, June 2010, Madison, WI), and “What are the physiological limitations to the distribution of yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) along an elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest?” (Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study Annual Cooperators’ Meeting, July  2010, Thornton, NH).
  • Michele Pruyn and her colleague Tim Fahey submitted a grant renewal proposal entitled “A Summer Research Experience at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest:  Investigating and Communicating Change in Ecosystems” to the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates Program in August 2010.
  • Kerry Yurewicz and undergraduate biology student Jacqulyn Huckins led aquatic education activities at an event held in Rumney, NH in July 2010 for Baker River Appreciation Day (hosted by D Acres Organic Farm & Educational Homestead).

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • The Center for Rural Partnerships hosted the Northern Forest Higher Education Network Annual Meeting at the Mountain View Grand Hotel, June 1-2, 2010.  Frances Belcher organized the event, which focused on two themes: Connections – strategies for higher education institutions engaged in regional initiatives related to economic vitality, environmental sustainability, and social well-being; and Curriculum – an exploration of the proposed Northern Forest Studies Program, a distributed inter-institutional undergraduate education program developed by Pavel Cenkl of Sterling College in partnership with NFHERN.

The two day meeting included a president’s forum panel featuring Katharine Eneguess (White Mountains Community College), Theo Kalikow (U Maine at Farmington), John Mills (Paul Smiths College), Carol A Moore (Lyndon State College), Sara Jayne Steen (PSU), and Will Wootton (Sterling College).  The panel was facilitated by Brian Kermath (Dir. Center for Sustainable Rural Development, U Maine at Fort Kent).

Cynthia “Mil” Duncan (Carsey Institute, UNH) and Joe Short (Northern Forest Center) provided the first of two keynote addresses: “Rural Resilience and the Natural Landscape in Northern Forest Communities.”  Sandford Blitz (Federal Co-Chair, Northern Borders Regional Commission) delivered the second: “The Northern Borders Regional Commission.”

Facilitate session topics included: “The Northern Forest Studies Program: A Model for Distributed Place-Based Education” and “A Seat at the Table: Integrating Strategies for Regional Well-Being with Higher Education Resources”

In addition to Frances Belcher, Thad Guldbrandsen, Ben Amsden, and graduate students Jodi Bartley, and Tom Evans attended the NFHERN Annual Meeting.  Terri Dautcher (COBA) helped facilitate.

  • “Agrileisure: Re-imagining the relationship between agriculture, leisure, and social change,” a paper authored by Ben Amsden and Jesse McEntee was accepted for publication in Leisure/Loisir: The Journal of the Canadian Association of Leisure Studies.  The article will appear in Fall 2010.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen joined the Leadership New Hampshire Class of 2011. http://www.leadershipnh.org/generaloverview.cfm
  • The Center for Rural Partnerships in collaboration with the Center for the Environment, the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, and others co-organized and co-facilitated the Coös County Symposium at the Balsams Grand Resort in May, 2010.
  • In partnership with USFS, AMC, and U.S. Department of Transportation, Ben Amsden and PSU undergraduate student Anastasia Deflumeri facilitated five discussion workshops with nearly 30 participants on the topic of transportation infrastructure.  These workshops were part of a larger grant-funded effort to assess options for alternative transportation within the White Mountain National Forest.
  • Ben Amsden attended the Rural Heritage Institute at Sterling College (Craftsbury Common, VT).  This year’s topic, “Is Local Enough? Promises and Limits of Local Action,” explored the developing dialogue between local and global concerns as it applies to economy, agriculture, history, food, culture, and rural identity.

 

Communication and Media Studies

  • Cathie LeBlanc presented her paper, “Social Media Games and the Performance of Self,” at the Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment conference at Oxford University in Oxford, England.
  • Annette Holba presented her paper, “Examining Josef Pieper’s Virtue Philosophy: Leisure as a Virtue Ethic” at the National Communication Association Communication Summer Ethics Conference.   Annette also received the Duquesne University Department of Communication & Rhetorical Studies Spiritan Award for Alumni Scholarship.  Additionally, she has been invited to be guest editor for a volume of the recently renamed journal, Listening: Journal of Communication, Religion, and Culture.

Counselor Education and School Psychology

  • Gary Goodnough presented a workshop (Repercussions of Coordinating State Testing) with Justin Pagnotta, a CAGS student, at the American School Counselor Association Annual Conference in Boston in July.
    • Hridaya Hall volunteered time in June to serve as core faculty for the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur section of National Camp School in the Adirondacks. Dr. Hall taught canoeing and backpacking skills to trek guides and also taught sections focused on group facilitation and team building.
    • Leo Sandy reviewed an article on “Trauma Counseling and Psychological Care for Former Liberian Child Soldiers” for the Peace and Justice Studies Journal.

 

Criminal Justice

  • Stephanie Halter had an article published this past May:  Halter, S. (2010). Factors that influence police conceptualizations of girls involved in prostitution in six U.S. cities: Child sexual exploitation victims or delinquents? Child Maltreatment, 15 (2), 152-160.
  • Kristine Miller’s article, “The Darkest Figure of Crime: Perceptions of Reasons for Male Inmates to Not Report Sexual Assault” was published in Justice Quarterly, Volume 27 Issue 5.
  • Mark Fischler attended the second biannual Integral Theory Conference in Pleasanton California and presented on the following topics:  Designing and Implementing Integral Theory in the University Classroom, Child Rape and the Death Penalty: An Integral Inquiry, and Integral Politics in the Age of Obama.
  • David Mackey and Michael Smith from Saint Anselm College presented “Validating the two prong test to determine the reasonableness of searches: A comparison of recent Supreme Court cases with the attitudes of college students” at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences held at Roger Williams University.

Education

  • Pat Cantor and Mary Cornish participated in the National Association for the Education of Young Children Professional Development Institute in June with a contingent of early childhood educators from Coos County, as part of their work with the Early Childhood Development Initiative in the North Country.  Pat and Mary have begun their second year with the ECD Initiative.  This year they will be developing an early childhood student leadership cohort for the North Country, providing professional development for early childhood educators in Coos County, and consulting with White Mountains Community College.  The ECD Initiative is funded by the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.
  • Marcel Lebrun presented at a conference entitled Embracing Inclusive Approaches for children and youth with special education needs in Riga Latvia. The presentation was entitled “Books, Blackboards and Bullets: School Shooters in the Schools.”  Marcel also presented at the 2nd Paris International Conference on Education, Economy & Society in July. His presentation was entitled “Depression and Violence in Schools.”
  • Mary Earick was chosen as an evaluation and efficacy reviewer for the US Department of Education’s Investing in Innovation Fund (i3). Mary’s MSP grant with the Center for the Environment was funded:  Teacher as Researcher: The role of inquiry and learning progressions through environmental science studies, with the Newfound School district, New Hampshire Higher Education Math Science Partnership, Plymouth State University, 2010 ($75,000) (Co-PI)

English

  • Bob Garlitz had paintings in the three-person art exhibit, “In The Mix,” at the Rey Center in Waterville Valley.
  • Karolyn Kinane presented “A Crash Course in Middle English” as part of the professional development seminar for New Hampshire school teachers “A Not-So-Distant Mirror: Teaching the Middle Ages in Middle and High School,” sponsored by the NH Humanities Council and hosted by Keene State College.
  • Robin DeRosa has received a book contract from Lexington Books, a division of Rowman and Littlefield, for a new collection focusing on hyperreality in media and culture to be published in 2011.  She is also serving as an outside reviewer on a P&T committee for a professor at Monmouth University, giving talks on the Salem witch trials for the New Hampshire Humanities Council, and beginning a term as the President of the Board of Directors for Voices Against Violence of Southern Grafton County.
  • Ann McClellan’s article, “Sweet Girl Graduates Gone Sour: University Women in Frances Marshall’s Fiction,” appeared this summer in English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920.  Her article, “The Gentleman’s Gentleman: The Butler as Simulacra in The Remains of the Day,” is forthcoming in a collection on S(t)imulated Realities: The Hyperreal in Popular Culture to be published by Lexington Press. She also presented a paper, “Far and Away: Women’s Scholarly Networks in Post-Colonial Britain,” at the Scholarly Networks in the British Empire: Transnational and Imperial Connections after 1850 conference at Wadham College, Oxford University, England in July, 2010.
  • Art Fried will present a paper on Jack Schiff (the comic book editor) at the annual meeting of the Northeast Popular Culture Association in Boston in October.
  • Liz Ahl, along with Elizabeth D’Amico (Art Department), was included in a juried show of the work of the Northeast Chapters of the Women’s Caucus for Art from August 4-28 at Boston’s Bromfield Gallery. Their poem-art pairs are also going to be on display at the New Hampton School Galletly Gallery, with an opening reception/reading on October 1.

 

Environmental Science and Policy

  • “The Habitable Planet” was awarded a SPORE prize from AAAS. SPORE stands for Science Prize for Online Resources in Education.   Warren Tomkiewicz was part of the team that created “The Habitable Planet.” The prize was announced in the May 28 issue of Science magazine: http://www.sciencemag.org/special/spore/

 

Frost School

  • Frost School Community Education held six children’s camps this summer: Lego Experiments for Girls; Future Film Makers; Junior Golf Clinic at Owl’s Nest with PGA pros, Joe Clark, Sr. and Joe Clark, Jr.; Lego Engineering Camp; Camp Costume; and Lego Tech Works Camp. More than 60 children in grades 2–8 participated.  Several PSU faculty and staff members partnered with us including Ashley Phillips–Film Making; Terri Dautcher-Camp Costume; Chris Drever, who has supported all of our Lego Camps since their inception in 2008; several members of the Screaming Eagles, the FIRST Robotics team that Chris mentors, have also served as interns. This year, Michael McGarry, nephew of Mary Ann McGarry, traveled from Colorado to intern at Lego tech Works Camp. Janine Neggers, spouse of Jeff Neggers, is our Lego Camps Master Teacher.

Global Education Office

  • Accompanied by Evelyn Stiller, 20 first-year PSU students are spending their fall semester studying at the University of Limerick, Ireland through our Freshman Abroad Program. This fall marks the 7th year of the Program.
  • This summer, 32 students completed their internships with organizations throughout New England, New Jersey, Georgia,  Australia, and Argentina.
  • Deb Regan has been appointed to a 3-year term with the International Advisory Council of University Partners for GlobaLinks Learning Abroad.  Through their educational programs of AustraLearn, AsiaLearn, and EuroLearn, GlobaLinks Learning Abroad partners with 62 universities around the world to provide study abroad opportunities to students.
  • In July, Cynthia Vascak (Art) and Katherine Harrington (French) joined GEO staff Deb Regan and Jess Morel in visiting Champlain College’s Montreal Campus to explore study away and internship opportunities for Art, Graphic Design, Communication Studies and French students.

Health and Human Performance

  • Christian Bisson served on a review team for the accreditation of Sterling College’s outdoor education program for their renewed accreditation from the Association for Experiential Education.
  • Mardie Burckes-Miller presented a two-day pre-conference on Untangling the Web of Weight Disorders at the 35th National Wellness Conference in Stevens Point, WI. in July.  Pre- conference participants also had the opportunity to enroll in a 3-credit graduate class through PSU’s Eating Disorders Institute program.
  • Center for Active Living and Healthy Communities: Fresh and delicious whole foods pour forth from two collaborative gardens in Plymouth as a result of the efforts of HHP Adventure Education Instructor Julie Bisson, assisted by UNH Coop Extension Master Gardener Bob Richer, and the Center for Active Living and Healthy Communities, directed by Barbara McCahan.  The Eco-learning Farmstand is an educational youth gardening project focusing on sustainable living practices and behaviors that support healthy, active living.  It is a “garden to market” project that brings together families in the Plymouth area to plant, tend, harvest and sell fresh produce at the Plymouth Farmers Market.  All profits go to the local Food Pantry.  Additional fresh produce is donated directly to the Food Pantry, Plymouth Senior’s Center, Meals for Many, Circle Camp and the Bridge House.  Garden spaces were donated by the Whole Village Family Resource Center and the Plymouth Methodist Church.  More information on the ELFS project is available at: www.ecolearningfarmstand.wordpress.com and all are invited to participate until the harvest is done!
  • Irene Cucina and Lynn Johnson provided an Elementary Physical Education Assessment Workshop May 6, 2010 entitled “Integrating Assessment Into the Learning Experience“at the South Orange-Maplewood School District in New Jersey.

History and Philosophy

  • Ray Perkins presented a paper, “Incomplete Symbols in _Principia Mathematica_ and Russell’s ‘Definite Proof,” at an international conference at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) in May: “PM@100”– a celebration of the 100th anniversary of Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead’s _Principia Mathematica_, a remarkable attempt to reduce all mathematics to logic and which profoundly impacted the worlds of philosophy and mathematics, making possible the development of a wide array of ideas from computers to Godel’s famous proof. “ 
  • Marcia Schmidt Blaine had an article published in the Summer 2010 Historical New Hampshire titled “’Mere Trade’ or ‘Learned Profession’?  Medical Practice in Dover, 1780-1850.”

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting and College of Graduate Studies TESOL M.Ed. student D. Joan Bishop presented a paper, “Educating English Language Learners in Prison,” at the fifth annual Teachers as Researchers Conference held at UNH Manchester May 15, 2010.  The paper detailed on-going research Whiting and Bishop are conducting at the Concord Correctional Facility for Men.
  • James Whiting’s article, “Addressing the Isolation of Low-Incidence ELL Settings Through Professional Learning Communities,” appeared in the 2010 issue of the New Hampshire Journal of Education.
  • James Whiting’s article,” Student Podcasts: Oral Assessment and e-Portfolios,” appeared in the Summer, 2010 issue of AccELLerate, published by National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition at George Washington University.

Music, Theater and Dance

  • Kathleen Arecchi has been reappointed as the Chair of the Strategic Planning Committee for NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing), having served in this capacity for the past two years.  She recently concluded her term as N.E. Regional Governor and National Board Member for NATS.
  • Robert Swift presented the keynote address for the opening convocation of the Governor Wentworth School District in Wolfeboro on August 26th.  The title of the talk was “The What, How, and Why of Teaching.”
  • Elizabeth Cox attended the Association of Theatre in Higher Education in Los Angeles in early August.  She is the current secretary/treasurer for the Acting Focus Group.  Beth was also a designated actor for a conference workshop, “Meisner Variations,” presented by David Kaye of UNH.  Beth attended a pre-conference workshop for voice and speech trainers with 100 year old Arthur Lessac of the Lessac Training Institute, “Body Wisdom, Vocal Life:  Exploring Lessac Energies.”   This summer, Beth also gave a dialect workshop and was the dialect coach for THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD at North Country Center for the Arts/Papermill Theatre in Lincoln, NH.
  • Rik Pfenninger recently had two of his jazz compositions included on the sound track for a new video game distributed by the German video company MobyGames.
  • Lisa Travis, artistic director of Terminal Hip Dance Theater, produced and directed a humorous dance performance this August at the new Flying Monkey performance center in Plymouth.  Ms. Travis was joined by colleague Amanda Whitworth, adjunct faculty members Tina Philibotte Howard and Audrey Eisenhauer, community artists Carole Ann Morrison of Ninth State, Krista Lampe, and Matt Cheney, PSU alumnus Jason Smith, and current PSU student Mervin Marvey.

Pakistan Project

  • The Pakistan Project focused on its U.S component during July.  An official State Department delegation of forty Pakistani educators participated in an intensive professional development institute at Plymouth State, examining initiatives in educational management and planning, conflict resolution, and environmental education for adaptation to Pakistan’s complex education sectors.  The delegates represented every province and Pakistan-administered area: Balochistan, Punjab, Sindh, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, Gilgit-Baltistan, the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, Islamabad Capital Territory, and Kashmir.  Coming together from such diverse backgrounds – geographically, ethnically, and linguistically – was an historic event for the delegates and in Pakistan education.

While in New Hampshire, the delegates engaged in cross-cultural and –educational experiences with American counterparts.  They joined educators at Newfound High School, Arts in Education Institute, and Plymouth Writing Project for shared opportunities to explore the project hallmark, “education without frontiers.”  During a four day visit to Washington, D.C., they met with senior leadership at the U.S. Department of State, Bureaus of South and Central Asian Affairs (SCA) and of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), and Office of the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan; the Embassy of Pakistan; and the Office of Senator Jeanne Shaheen.  Hosts included Assistant Secretary of State, ECA, Ann Stock, Pakistan Ambassador Hussain Haqqani, Embassy Minister Faqir Asif Hussain, and Senator Shaheen.  The Voice of America interviewed Pashto and Urdu speaking delegates in T.V. and radio mediums for transmission to Pakistan. ECA Program Officer Adam Meier coordinated the Washington events.

Thanks to the many offices, staff and faculty of the PSU community who supported the institute, including the College of Graduate Studies.  They contributed to wonderful memories of the PSU experience for the Pakistani delegates. The core team consisted of project director Blake Allen, institute coordinator John Martin, administrative assistant Michelle Lauriat, graduate intern Kelly Nelson of Lin-wood High School, graduate assistant Julie Tallman of New Hampton School, and Mary Lyon residential staff Sarah Roesener, PSU’10, Peter Osbourne , Julie Crisafi, and Erik Anderson.  Instruction was provided by JoAnn Guilmet, Norm Shippee, technology; Gary Goodnough, Hridaya Hall, educational management and planning;  Leo Sandy, conflict resolution; Marguerite Crowell, Mary Ann McGarry, Douglas Eirick, Jeremiah Duncan, Warren Tomkiewicz, environmental education; Kimberly Rawson Sychterz, Emily Squibb, Richard Giard, and Marilyn Ashley, master action plan design and development.  Investigator Jennifer Frank, University Police Department, provided security oversight. Lisa Ladd led the orientation process, with contributions by Tammy Hill, Jennifer Frank, Sue Scheinman, Kirk McClelland, Robert Hlasney, and Beth Shehadi.  David Berona of Lamson Learning Commons; Gail Bourn of the Plymouth Writing Project; Marie Ross, Superintendant, SAU 4; Susan Amburg, Office of Sponsored Programs; and Cynthia Vascek and Wendy Oellers of the Arts in Education Institute shared dynamic work.   Thanks also to the wonderful staffs at Prospect Dining Hall and at Lamson Learning Commons for their assistance with the Pakistani delegates.

The project now focuses on the Pakistan component, with delegates returning to implement institute training in professional development activities.  However, due to the magnitude of the natural and human disasters that are profoundly affecting Pakistan, project director Blake Allen is working with the in-country team in Islamabad and Lahore and alumni leaders throughout Pakistan on revised strategic planning for the Pakistan phase.  The floods, loss of human life and of critical infrastructures, mass movement of refugees and long-term impact of the devastation affects the project’s 160 Plymouth State University Pakistani alumni, including each 2010 delegate.  Alumni and Pakistan sub-award organization, Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA), are deeply involved with flood relief efforts: http://pelinstitute.org; www.itacec.org.

The U.S. Department of State has approved funding for the FY2010 project and its 2011 institute.  Allen will be working with State Department and Embassy officials, ITA and alumni leaders on integrating reconstruction challenges and initiatives into the project and institute. Experiences working with post-2005 Kashmir earthquake reconstruction teams also are shaping the planning.  The 2011 institute curriculum will examine the implications of climate change. With current events in Pakistan, “Education in Emergencies” now will provide the context.

PASS Office

  • The PASS office has received official notification of renewal of their TRIO grant.  They have been awarded a yearly amount of $310,020.00; funding extends over the next five years.
  • The PASS office has instituted a new evening study skills tutoring program from 5:00-9:00pm Monday through Thursday. Students can drop in to receive assistance in developing new study techniques or organizational strategies.

Social Science

  • David Starbuck (Anthropology and Sociology) and Filiz Otucu (Political Science) led a tour group of 20 faculty and students to modern and ancient sites throughout Turkey, leaving Boston on May 27 and returning on June 7. They visited Troy, Ephesus, King Midas’ Tomb, and a host of other cultural sites.  The group absolutely loved Turkey!  David also spent six weeks this summer directing students and volunteers at archaeological sites of the French and Indian War in Fort Edward, New York, and presented a lecture entitled “Excavating the Past at Fort Edward and Lake George” to the ASRC Falconer Science/Natural History Lecture Series in Wilmington, NY, on August 24 (atop Whiteface Mountain).
  • At the end of September a solar hot water and solar electric system will be installed on the EcoHouse as part of a class project. The system was designed by students in our Sustainability in Residences Project class during the Spring of 2010, and will be installed through a partnership with the Plymouth Area Renewable Energy Initiative. Stay tuned for more details and the installation date!
  • At the end of October Steve Whitman will be travelling to Haiti with some PSU graduates to work on a new sustainability and reforestation project. The project is Sadhana Forest Haiti and an extension of the successful project in India. The web address is: http://sadhanaforest.org/wp/category/projects/haiti/.
  • Khuan Chong has a limited edition of his book of poetry  “ DISINI: PENANG”  published by the Phoenix Press in Malaysia.  He had a round-table discussion on “ Education and Heritage” with Justice Ohara of Penang and Ahmad Cik, President of the Penang Heritage Trust.

 

Social Work

  • Steve Gorin has been reappointed as Editor-in-Chief of the Health and Social Work Editorial Board of the National Association of Social Work, 2011-2015.  Steve has also been appointed to the CSWE Council on Professional Development, 2010-2013, and has been asked to conduct a national NASW Webinar on health care in February 2011.
  • Scott Meyer. Along with Leo Sandy, co-presented a paper, “Disturbing the Classroom Peace,” at the American Association of University Professors Annual Conference in Washington, DC in June.
  • Cyndy Moniz has been appointed to the CSWE Commission on Professional Development, 2010-2013.
  • Christine Rine has been elected to the Board of Directors, NH Chapter, National Association of Social Workers (NASW).

 

May 2010

May 14th, 2010 by Bridget

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
May 5, 2010

Dear Colleagues,

As we approach the end of another year, I’d like to take a moment to thank each and every one of you for the work that you do on behalf of our students and Plymouth State University. From Bob Nadeau’s work with the Chamber of Commerce, to our faculty in Music, Theatre, and Dance who guide our students to provide spectacular cultural events, to Krisan Evenson’s “afghan square for Afghanistan,” to everyone who made the Weeks Act celebrations a great success, to Eileen Bennett and the students organizing the Chili Cook-off, to the faculty who advise student organizations, to the Administrative Assistants who support our departments, to all the faculty that participated in the faculty calling program, and to faculty who devoted their time to taskforces, advisory groups, councils and committees, I could go on and on; but let me just say, simply, thank you! Plymouth State is truly a wonderful place and you are all a major reason for that. Best wishes to all for a wonderful summer.

Reminder: Distinguished Teacher Awards today!

The Distinguished Teacher Awards will be announced today immediately following the faculty meeting in Heritage. Everyone is welcome to join us in celebration of our colleagues.

Commencement

Please note there are some changes to our commencement procedures and processional route. The memo sent out this week is attached to the end of this document. Please review these changes.

Institutional Research

Scott Mantie’s title of Associate Dean of Institutional Research and Assessment has been changed to Associate Dean of Institutional Research and Effectiveness to better reflect the scope of responsibilities of the office including serving in a leadership role of the Planning, Budgeting Leadership Group (PBLG) and the Enrollment Management Group (EMAG).

News from Academic Affairs

Art

  • Elizabeth D’Amico will have three of her works in the juried exhibit “Twist of Lyme” at Long Rivers Studio in Lyme, NH from May 1 – May 22, a group show with the Women’s Caucus for Arts/New Hampshire Chapter (WCA/NH) members’ work.
  • Annette Mitchell had artwork accepted into the “Twist of Lyme Juried Show” at the Long River Studios, Lyme, NH in May. One of her art quilts was also accepted into the Victoria and Albert Museum’s (London, England) online collection March 6-July 4, 2010 (www.vam.ac.uk/microsites/quilts/gallery/patterns), and she presented a printmaking demonstration to the Lakes Region Art Association in Laconia, NH on April 19, 2010.
  • Liz D’Amico’s digital photograph “The Green Fuse” is in the first Upper Valley PhotoSlam at PhotoStop Gallery in White River Junction, Vt. The exhibit will be on display from May 7th –22nd with an Opening and Closing party on both dates from 5-8pm.

Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry

  • Graduate students, Jared Rennie and Mitch McCue, and Professor Jim Koermer traveled to the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to present a 2-hour briefing to NASA and Air Force meteorologists on their just completed graduate research on predicting strong winds with thunderstorms for the space complex. Jared used radar techniques for short term forecast and Mitch used balloon-borne observational data for slightly longer predictions of these winds, which pose problems for operational forecasters. There is a good possibility that some of these techniques will be adopted for operational use. The group will also be the luncheon speakers at the local Cape Canaveral Chapter of the American Meteorological Society.
  • Aparna Waghe, Marguerite Crowell and two chemistry undergraduates, Pat Gile and Jake Vallimont, visited the local elementary school for Chemists Celebrate Earth Day on April 28. Inquiry-based activities with third graders focused on plants, and included learning about natural pigments in plants, and the effect of acid rain on plant growth and development.
  • Congratulations to two meteorology students who distinguished themselves this year in the Weather Challenge: the North American Collegiate Forecasting Contest. Undergraduate student, Brian Pevear, was the overall winner!. Alexander Jacques, a graduate student, finished in the top 16. Both students qualified for the “tournament” by forecasting for two week periods at ten cities over the academic year and finishing in top 64 out of nearly 2000 undergrads, grads, professors, and professionals. The top 64 forecasters advanced to the tournament bracket and forecasted for three weeks (April 5 – 23) for Amarillo, TX. Alexander made it to the round of 16 and Brian was the winner!

Biological Sciences

  • Chris Chabot, gave a research presentation on April 29th at St. Paul’s School, Concord, NH entitled “Limulus Behavior: its generation and modulation.” He also co-presented 6 posters with 18 PSU students and 1 USM student at the Northeast Undergraduate Research and Development Symposium, held at the University of New England, Biddeford, ME, on April 19, 2010: a) Localization of PERIOD Protein in the Brain of Limulus polyphemus. Tardif, David P.; Newton, Carly E.; Fehlner, Heather E.; Park, Shiwha; Chabot, Christopher C.; The effects of chemical and visual predator cues on heart rate and behavior of the crayfish, Orconectes virilis. Turner, Stephen A.; Gagnon, Paul; McKay, Brant T.; Wasilew, Ashley D.; Chabot, Christopher C.; Genetic Relatedness of Two Geographically Distinct Populations of Limulus polyphemous. Capach, Katherine N., Arn Devin, Newton, Carly., Chabot Christopher C.; The Effect of Melatonin on Locomotor Activity in Orconectes virilis. Dickerman, Trevor R.; Van Vliet, Casey A.; Chabot, Christopher C.; The Effects of Epinephrine and Melatonin on Heartrate in the American Lobster, Homarus americanus. Brooks, Bethany D., Cloutier, Sarah K., Martin, Jaclyn M; Chabot, Christopher C.; The effects of photoperiodic and tidal cycles on the activity of juvenile horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus. Simpson, Stephen; Lemmon, Mike; Chabot, Christopher C.

Center for the Environment

  • Aaron Johnson, Senior Laboratory Technician, was the speaker at the Baker River Watershed Association’s annual meeting on April 29, 2010. He presented and overview of the Center’s Environmental Research Laboratory.
  • Mark Green, hydrologist for CFE and the US Forest Service Northern Research Station, recently had a paper published in Biogeochemistry titled “Patterns of hydrologic control over stream water total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios.” Mark also gave an invited talk on “Hydrologic Change during the Colonial Era of the United States: Beavers and the Energy Cost of Impoundments” and presented a poster on “Exploring the History of Time in an Integrated System: the Ramifications for Water” at this winter’s American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco titled.
  • Through a Coos County Outreach Initiative grant from the Center for Rural Partnerships, Aaron Johnson, Mark Green, and June Hammond Rowan, outreach and development coordinator, have been working with the Israel River Watershed Advisory Group on testing the river in Jefferson and Lancaster for chloride. They will present the results of the project at the Jefferson Conservation Commission meeting in May.
  • Madeline McElaney, CFE graduate student, wrote the energy efficiency and community sustainability chapter for the Town of Plymouth master plan. This project serves as her capstone project for a Masters Degree in Environmental Science and Policy. She presented her work to the Plymouth Land Use committee on Aril 15th and followed with a presentation at CFE Science Colloquium on April 21st titled “Planning for Energy Efficiency and Community Sustainability”.
  • CFE’s director, Patrick Bourgeron, presented a talk about ecosystem services to the Hubbard Brook Committee of Scientists meeting on April 14, 2010 at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY. Mark Green also attended the meeting. Further collaboration with Hubbard Brook will be developed on the topic.
  • Major changes to the M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy were presented by CFE and approved by the Graduate Council on April 26th. Changes include the creation of a primary and secondary core in STEM core disciplines. The M.S. is now better aligned with the needs of the workforce in the region and beyond and with PSU strategic plan.
  • The Center for the Environment, in partnership with the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation (HBRF), is preparing for the third summer of the NSF funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). Eight undergraduates from around the country will be coming to Hubbard Brook for ten weeks to work on research and science communication projects. Mary Ann McGarry, associate professor of science education, and Geoff Wilson, HBRF and adjunct faculty, are the coordinators of the REU. Patrick Bourgeron is the Principal Investigator.
  • Graduate students Marguerite Crowell, Nick Stevenson, and Christian Weber co-presented a talk with the Town of Canaan at the NH Department of Environmental Services Annual Drinking Water Source Protection Workshop on April 30th. The talk, “Protecting Drinking Water in Canaan Street Lake Watershed,” covered the results from their Land Use Planning Seminar fall course. Nick also presented a talk with Brian Eisenhauer on “How can Community-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) be used to Protect Local Water Resources? A primer on CBSM, examples of CBSM techniques, and the basics of how to apply them to measure and build support for local water resources protection.”
  • Mark Green, hydrologist for CFE and the US Forest Service Northern Research Station, was invited to make a presentation at Harvard Forest on April 30th titled “Exploring Historical Hydrology in the Northeast United States”.
  • CFE’s director, Patrick Bourgeron, along with George Tuthill, Associate Vice President for the College of Graduate Studies, attended an EPScOR meeting in Concord. The purpose of the meeting was to create teams to write white papers leading to pre-proposals to NSF on the broad themes of climate change and energy. Patrick was charged to write one of the white papers with colleagues from UNH and other NH institutions on the topic of ecosystems services, land use change, and climate variability.

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • Registration is open for the annual meeting of the Northern Forest Higher Education Resource Network (NFHERN) on June 1 & 2 at the Mountain View Grand Resort in Whitefield, NH. PSU faculty are encouraged to join this gathering of academic, community, and private sector leaders to explore the role of higher education in the vitality of rural communities from the Adirondacks to Nova Scotia. See http://nfhern.org for more details.
  • Ben Amsden attended the Northeastern Recreation Research (NERR) conference in Bolton Landing, New York. He presented two papers: “Agri-leisure: Exploring the ‘Fun’ of Local Food” (with Jesse McEntee) and “Reinventing ‘Retrotels’: Using Engaged Scholarship to Market Nostalgia Tourism in Rural New Hampshire” (with Thad Guldbrandsen and Mark Okrant)
  • Thad Guldbrandsen and Mark Okrant (with Ben Amsden) presented “Retrotours: Nostalgia, Tourism, and the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism” at the Northeast Modern Language Association Meeting in Montreal.
  • Fran Belcher and Thad Guldbrandsen presented, “Creating an Engagement Model for Small Rural Colleges and Universities,” at the North East Campus Compact meeting in Burlington, Vermont.
  • Student presentations in the Community Research Experience class will be from 3:00-6:00 on Tuesday, May 18 in Heritage Commons. We are also accepting applications from students to participate in next semester’s class.
  • Ben Amsden received a grant from the Northeast Center for Risk Management Education to fund a collaborative project with UVM Extension addressing food safety education and planning for agritourism providers in Vermont and New Hampshire.

College of Business Administration

  • Duncan McDougall was recognized at the ACBSP Board of Commissioners meeting, held in Kansas City, Missouri, from April 15-17, 2010. This was his last meeting as a Commissioner. At the close of the meetings, Mr. Douglas Viehland, the Executive Director of ACBSP, presented Duncan with two Certificates of Appreciation from ACBSP, one for his five years’ service as a commissioner, and the other a special “Certificate of Excellence in recognition of your contributions to ACBSP in editing the ACBSP Baccalaureate/Graduate Standards and Criteria for Accreditation, both in 2004, and again in the newly revised 2010 version.”
  • Duncan’s article, “Operating at the Rate of Consumption: Did Inventory Reductions Prevent Recessions During the 1990s?” has just been published in a volume entitled Globalization, Integration and Transition: Challenges for Developing and Developed Countries, by UK-based INFER, the International Network For Economic Research. The book is available on Amazon.com. Dr. McDougall presented this research article at an INFER conference while on sabbatical in Romania in 2009.
  • Yvette Lazdowski and Brad Allen attended the 4th Annual Conference on Course Redesign in Orlando, FL, March 28-30. This conference showcased various colleges and universities and how they used dynamic teaching models that improved efficiency and learning.

College of Graduate Studies

The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), officials have notified Blake Allen, director of the ECA funded Pakistani Educational Leadership Project at Plymouth State University, that ECA will be expanding its project. There also are several other project grants open that represent the shift that has taken place since 2003. They encompass a FY 07 open competition award, a FY 08 Member Request, and a FY 09 ECA line item. Since initial funding in FY03, the program has expanded from a summer institute housed at PSU to its current status as a full-fledged project with robust components in the U.S. and Pakistan. Allen is responsible for ensuring that all goals are met and all activities take place in both countries. Because of the revised scope of work and responsibilities, Allen now reports to officials at ECA and to senior officials at the U.S. Embassy, Islamabad. Allen also supervises the project team in Islamabad and Lahore, with Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aaghi (ITA) providing in-country services.

Special thanks to the Office of Sponsored Programs – Susan Amburg, Liane Sutcliffe, and Tara DiSalvo – for their unflagging and time-consuming support during the transition, and to project administrative assistant Michelle Lauriat.

In late March and early April, Allen visited South Asia, participating in meetings to discuss the project expansion with senior officials from the U.S. Embassy, New Delhi, U.S. Consulate, Lahore, and Pakistan High Commission, New Delhi. She also had a lengthy meeting with the Pakistan High Commissioner to India, Ambassador Shahid Malik.

In collaboration with ITA director Baela Raza Jamil, Allen hosted an ECA-funded joint conference in Delhi and Karachi, Pakistan, for Pakistani, Indian and American educators. It examined the role of educational leadership in civil society, integrating themes of environmental stewardship, cultural heritage, and conflict resolution through peace building.

Americans participating included Allen, Mary Ann McGarry PSU; John Martin, Laconia High School; Gail Bourn, Plymouth Writing Project and Elm Street School; Kelly Nelson, Linwood High School; and Erik Anderson, Winnisquam High School. Erik and Kelly also are CoGS graduate students. The American educators shared dynamic projects with their Indian and Pakistani colleagues. Special thanks to them for their extraordinary team work that crossed countries and cultures, representing “education without frontiers.”

After the conference, Allen traveled to Lahore, Pakistan. She had touching reunions with many project alumni from the Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, Azad Jammu Kashmir, and Islamabad. Visiting alumni schools in many of Lahore’s impoverished communities, she had special opportunities to interact with students and their families. She also was a guest lecturer on cultural heritage and educational initiatives in undergraduate and graduate classrooms at the Institute for Professional Learning, University of Education, and at the University of Punjab.

As an ECA-funded project director, Allen also met with senior administrators at Lahore’s universities, educational foundations, government funded professional development organizations, and at the World Wildlife Fund-Pakistan. Many of them expressed interest in developing linkages with Plymouth State. President Steen and Provost Bernier have appointed Dr. George Tuthill as the point of contact to explore opportunities.

The nomination and selection process for this year’s project has been completed in Pakistan. The delegation of forty will be geographically diverse and continue team building in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, North-West Frontier Province, and Balochistan. In July they will participate in the intensive professional development institute housed at PSU, and in August return to Pakistan to act as Master Trainers throughout the country. While at the institute they will develop Master Action Plans that they are required to implement in Pakistan.

Institute instructors for this summer include Mary Ann McGarry, Warren Tomkiewicz, Marguerite Crowell, Gail Mears, Leo Sandy, Gary Goodnough, Hridaya Hall, Kim Rawson Sychterz, and John Martin. John also will continue as project technology architect and be the institute coordinator.

The campus wide Pakistan committee of dedicated PSU staff members consists of Tammy Hill, Physical Plant, Lisa Ladd and Kirk McClelland, Global Education Office, Liane Sutcliffe and Tara DiSalvo, Office of Sponsored Programs, Chief Creig Doyle and Investigator Jennifer Frank, University Police Department. The Office of the President, Academic Affairs, College of Graduate Studies, Conferences and Special Events, Residential Life, Sodexo, and Lamson Learning Commons also provide valuable support for the institute component.

Computer Science and Technology

  • Peter Drexel and Christian Roberson presented their paper, “’Using MBTI in a Project-Based Systems Analysis and Design Course,” at the 2010 International Conference on Engineering and Meta-Engineering: ICEME in Orlando, Florida on April 7th.
  • On April 16th Christian Roberson coached the PSU programming team consisting of Tim Madan, Nick Ortakales, and Kris Reynolds at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges — Northeastern Region’s 2010 Programming Contest, held at the University of Hartford. This year the team came in 12th place overall in a field of 29 teams and defeated teams from a variety of schools.

Counselor Education and School Psychology

  • Leo Sandy facilitated this year’s Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology Diversity Institutes Seventh Annual Conference on “Addressing the psychosocial needs of NH incarcerated individuals and their families.”

Education

  • Pat Cantor chaired a Vermont Department of Education state approval team to review the teacher education programs at Champlain College, March 28-31. Pat was also the invited keynote speaker at the New Hampshire Child Development Bureau’s Celebration of Early Childhood and Afterschool Professionals in Concord on April 13. The event was attended by over 300 people, including the Governor and the Commissioner of Health and Human Services. The speech focused on challenges and opportunities facing early childhood and afterschool professionals today.
  • Pat Cantor and Mary Cornish presented “Seduced by the Screen: Helping Families to Understand the Impact of Electronic Media on Infants and Toddlers” at the New Hampshire Association for the Education of Young Children Annual Conference in Nashua on April 24. Eight PSU early childhood students also attended the conference.
  • Clarissa Uttley was an invited speaker for a regional Human-Animal Interaction professional organization (March 27, 2010). Project N.I.N.A. – The state of Human-Animal Interaction Programming in New England. Windwalker Humane Coalition for Professional Pet Assisted Therapy. Monthly Meeting. Providence, RI. Clarissa also presented at a state-wide conference with a student from the Early Childhood Studies program (April 24, 2010). A comparison of parent and teacher reports on the social-emotional development of young children: Implications and strategies for building relationships with families. New Hampshire Association for the Education of Young Children. Spring Conference. Nashua, NH.
  • Clarissa Uttley and C. Roberts had a chapter published: “ Gender Portrayal in Early Childhood Children’s Books.” in Jacobson, T. (Ed.). Perspectives on Gender in Early Childhood Education. Saint Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.

English

  • Karolyn Kinane organized and presented on a pedagogy roundtable entitled “Skills, Content, and Medieval and Renaissance Literature” at PSU’s 31st annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum. She also organized a mini Med-Ren Fair for Plymouth-area seventh graders and the general public, featuring a falconry demo, smithing station, live chess match, longbow archery demo, and workshops on Celtic art, chainmail and glass etching, also at this year’s highly successful Forum.
  • Robin DeRosa attended the 41st annual Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA) Conference in April. She chaired a panel on “Postmodern Tourism” and presented a paper, “No Man of the Mountain: Absence and Nostalgia in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.” Her book, “The Making of Salem,” has been nominated by its publisher (McFarland) for a Popular Culture Award.
  • Ann McClellan attended the 41st annual Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA) Conference in April. She presented a paper on servants in Kazuo Ishiguro’s “The Remains of the Day” and chaired a panel called “House Work: Masters and Servants in Post-Modern Culture.”

Environmental Science and Policy

  • vpaa-espdrains-to-riverA community engagement service project was initiated by Steve Kahl of the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District and PSU faculty member MaryAnn McGarry. Graduate and undergraduate Environmental Science and Policy students, as well as sixth grade students at Plymouth Elementary School, have begun the campaign to raise awareness about the problems of storm water runoff in more urban areas like Plymouth, which has lots of non-absorbent surfaces like roads, parking lots, and roofs. Students have begun stenciling the drains in downtown Plymouth (look for the green fish next to the logo “drains to streams”), to emphasize that rainwater can carry pollutants into streams affecting water quality. In addition to stenciling the drains, there was an interactive exhibit on Earth Day on the PSU campus and on April 30th at Plymouth Elementary School for community members to explore the issues of storm water runoff. The display includes a contest to guess how many drains exist in Plymouth and encourages residents to take responsible actions, like pledging to wash cars on lawns rather than over pavement, so soap and other pollutants will be absorbed into the ground, instead of running down slope into drains that lead to the Baker and Pemigewasset Rivers.
  • During the week of April 12-16, ESP students Leanne O’Connor & Courtney Webb traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in the Association of American Geographers conference. They attended paper sessions, met with alumni at an Ethiopian Restaurant with professors May, Schroeder, and Middlekauff, and enjoyed field trips to the Mall monuments and neighborhoods of Baltimore, MD led by Patrick May.
  • Mary Ann McGarry, Lisa Spradley (ED), Doug Earick (CFE), George Tuthill (CoGS), Warren Tomkiewicz and graduate students Adrien Deshaies and Chuck Patterson conducted a series of workshops this spring for science teachers from six school districts dealing with Earth System Science and Inquiry. The project was administered by the NH Department of Education with funds from the Mathematics & Science Program in Washington.

Frost School of Continuing and Professional Studies

  • On April 14, 36 sixth graders and their teachers came to Plymouth State for a day of touring the campus and having special presentations by various departments. Many areas took time to present to these young people — from the Global Education Office to University Studies, Lamson Library, Meteorology, the Financial Aid folks and faculty from the HHP, Criminal Justice, and Education departments. Their day included lunch at the dining hall and a tour of the Art department. This concluded their Kids2College program that they had been working on for several months. This was the second year that PSU has been able to participate in this national program.
  • On April 28 Linda Hammond spoke to the Rotary Club in Plymouth and gave a presentation of the many facets of Community Education with a focus on our summer camp program. The camps are: Future Filmmakers Camp with Ashley Phillips, LEGO Experiments Camp for Girls, LEGO Engineering Camp for Grades 2-4, and LEGO Tech Works Camp for Grades 5-8 by Janine Neggers, Junior Golf Clinic with Joe Clark Jr. and Joe Clark Sr., and Camp Costume with Terri Dautcher. The summer promises to be very busy here at PSU.

Global Education Office (GEO)

  • Jess Morel participated in an undergraduate and graduate student recruitment tour hosted by ELS. Jess met with students, families and agents in Seoul South Korea, as well as Beijing, Guanzhou, Shenzhen, Shanghai and Huangzhou China. While there, a reporter from the Chronicle of Higher Education spent a day with the university representatives and interviewed Jess for an article on the potential of the growing China market for U.S. universities.
  • On Saturday, April 24 GEO, in partnership with the U. S. Department of State Passport Processing Center, offered members of the PSU community and the greater Plymouth community the opportunity to apply for passports on campus. Over 100 passport applications were processed.
  • GEO is pleased to announce a new PSU exchange agreement with the University of Plymouth, U.K. We will be hosting two students from UoP for the upcoming academic year.
  • Through our National Student Exchange Program, Amanda Dean, a Public Policy and Administration major from Western Oregon University will be joining us as our first RA exchange student. She will be working with Janette Wiggett.

Health and Human Performance

  • The 5th Annual New Hampshire Athletic Trainers’ Association Student Symposium was held at Plymouth State on Sunday, April 25th. Liesl Lindley presented, “Involve & Evolve – Professional Involvement & Legislative Efforts.” Graduate students Kristen Scott (MS ’10) and Marie Trombulak (MS ’10) presented their research, “Functional Screen Aberrant Motion at the Knee Does Not Equate to Torque Deficits at the Hip.” Brad Emerton (BS ’10), Alex Dria (MS ’10) and Alicia Edwards (MS ’11) won 1st place in the Quiz Bowl.

Lamson Learning Commons

  • April Publications
    • David A. Beronä
      “Introduction” to Malcolm Salaman’s The Art of the Woodcut: Masterworks from the 1920s. Dover Publications, 2010.
    • Ellen Marie Murphy
      “Plymouth State’s Adoption of Mahara”. The AAEEBL Learn, April 2010
  • Conference, Presentations, and Workshop Attendance
    • Ellen Marie Murphy
      • Presenter: “Assessment through Technology”, Conference Presentation, NHWHEL conference, Concord, NH April 9th, 2010
      • Presenter: “Mahara: open source and comprehensive e-portfolio Interactive Workshop”, Sloan-C Annual Blended Learning Conference, Oak Brook, IL, April 18th – 20th, 2010
    • David A. Beronä
      • Presented the paper, “Library & Learning Commons at Plymouth State University: Looking Back… Moving Forward,” at Library Design Symposium, LYRASIS New England, Southborough, MA April 9, 2010.
  • May, 2010
    Conference, Presentations, and Workshop Attendance
    • Ellen Marie Murphy
      • Paper Presentation “Implementing a campus-wide use of ePortfolios with Mahara” SUNY Annual Conference on Instructional Technologies, Plattsburgh, NY, May 25- 28, 2010
      • Presenter: “Can an e-Portfolio Catch Fire”, The Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence Based Learning Stonehill Conference, Stonehill, MA, May 18, 2010
        SIG Master, Annual Nercomp SIG Master’s Meeting, Wellesley, MA, May 19th, 2010

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting gave an invited talk to the Mount Washington Valley English Language Teachers Association in North Conway on April 12th. Whiting spoke about research he is conducting on low-incidence English language teaching and learning, as well as alternative forms of assessment for English language learners.

Mathematics

  • Dana Ernst: 1. Presentation: “A diagrammatic representation of a Temperley–Lieb algebra” by Dana Ernst, Hudson River Undergraduate Mathematics Conference, Keene State College, April 17, 2010; 2. Took 11 students to the Hudson River Undergraduate Mathematics Conference at Keene State College on April 17, 2010; 3. Talk: “On the cyclically fully commutative elements of Coxeter groups” by Sarah Otis and Leal Rivanis (mentored by Dana Ernst), Hudson River Undergraduate Mathematics Conference, Keene State College, April 17, 2010; 4. Talk on April 28: “On an open problem of the symmetric group” by Dana Ernst, PSU Mathematics Seminar, April 28, 2010; 5. Presented highlights of “Chapter 3: Education, Research, and Public Engagement” of PSU’s 2010 Carbon Action Plan during the April 14 open forum to discuss the CAP
  • Tom Boucher’s reviews of the following papers have appeared in Mathematical Reviews:
    1. Zadkarami, M. R. (2008). ”On identifiability in weighted distributions using generalized maximum likelihood estimation”. J. Iran. Stat. Soc. (JIRSS) 7, no. 1-2, 73–84.
    2. Holstein, D., and Kantz, H. (2009). “Optimal Markov approximations and generalized embeddings”. Phys Rev E 79, 056202 (2009).
  • As a committee member for Regina Kelly’s dissertation, Tom attended her dissertation defense “Brief Mindfulness Meditation and Its Effect on One’s Happiness” via teleconference on April 24th, 2010 at SDUIS, San Diego, CA.
  • Barbara Boschmans & Brian Beaudrie gave the following presentation: “Turning Work Problems into Hands-On Puzzles” at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference and Exposition, San Diego, CA, April 22nd 2010.
  • Natalya Vinogradova presented “Exploring Geometric Shapes as a Visualization of Basic Algebraic Ideas” at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference and Exposition, San Diego, CA, April 22nd 2010.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Kathleen Arecchi served as Regional Governor, coordinated the New England Regional Finals for the NATS Artist Award Competition that was held on April 25 at the Indian Hill Music Center in Littleton, MA. The purpose of this competition is to identify a career-ready classical singer deserving of a NATS-sponsored debut recital at Carnegie Hall.
  • Aegean Dance for Alto Trombone and Percussion by Gary Corcoran was performed at Lee University (Cleveland, Tennessee) by Douglas Warner, Principal Trombone of the Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra. Gary also recently served as an adjudicator of the Concerto Contest, held at the Manchester Community Music School and sponsored by the Lakes Region Symphony Orchestra.
  • In April, Beth Cox was invited to work with the students of St. Martin’s Episcopal School in Metarie, Louisiana as a voice workshop convener and vocal/text coach for their upcoming production of Shakepeare’s Merchant of Venice. Kevin Asselin, PSU alum ’97, is directing this production. Beth is also working as a dialect coach with Phillips Andover Academy through their April rehearsals for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Locally, Beth did vocal/text coaching for the recent Plymouth State Theatre production of Marat/Sade and has been part of Ernest Thompson’s film shoot of his original production, Time and Charges.
  • Rik Pfenninger and Don Williams recently performed in Boston at the Boston Harbor Towers artist-in-residence series. This year’s performance took place in the Penthouse overlooking Boston Harbor.
  • Jonathan Santore conducted the premiere of his work Comfort Ye with the Hanover High School Concert Band on March 4. His compositions The Owl and the Pussycat and Kalevala Fragments were accepted for publication by Yelton Rhodes Music in Los Angeles. In addition, Kalevala Fragments has been selected for performance at the 2010 National Conference of the College Music Society in Minneapolis. His orchestra composition Lucky Sevens, conducted by MTD colleague Dan Perkins, premiered at joint concerts of the New Hampshire Master Chorale and the PSU Chamber Singers on April 30 and May 1.

Philosophy

  • The Coalition for a Culture of Peace in NH Higher Education had their second annual Conference hosted by UNH Manchester on Saturday, March 27. Coalition co-founder, Ray Perkins, reported that eight institutions of higher learning in the region were represented by peace educators and their students, including many who have participated in model UN programs at their respective colleges and universities. Leo Sandy was there representing PSU.

Psychology

  • vpaa-phsycologyPsychology students, along with John Kulig, attended the first annual student New Hampshire Psychological Association conference held Saturday, April 10th at Colby-Sawyer College in New London, NH. The highlight was a Psych Cup competition of teams from NH colleges and universities. The PSU team is shown here: Left to right: Dr John Kulig (coach), Ashley Hardy, Lindsay dePorter, Kaitlin Sapack and Sarah Buckley.

Social Science

  • Marcia Schmidt Blaine continues to give talks around the state for the NH Humanities Council. On April 26, she spoke in Keene at the Cheshire County Historical Society on “A Woman that Keeps Good Orders: Women and Tavern Keeping in 18th-century New Hampshire.” On April 7, she spoke in Enfield on “Runaway Wives in Colonial New England.” She also gave a Weeks Act Centennial Lecture on “Saving the Forests: Joseph B. Walker, Philip Ayres, and the 1911 Weeks Act” on campus on April 1. Marcia was also elected to the Executive Committee of the New England Historical Association at the annual meeting on April 17.
  • Patrick May, Kurt Schroeder and Bryon Middlekauff participated in the annual Association of American Geographers meetings, April 13-19, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Kurt presented a paper focusing upon the Crimean War, Pat was on a panel whose theme centered around helping undergraduates down the path to graduate school, and Kurt and Bryon led a field trip to Harpers Ferry and Antietam Battlefields military parks. Additionally, we hosted an alumni event attended by current students, four former PSU students, and one former faculty at a local Ethiopian restaurant. Nine PSU students attended the conference sessions and participated in a field trip to Baltimore neighborhoods and Washington, DC monuments and historic sites led by Pat May.

Social Work

  • Congratulations to the Student Social Work Club for receiving the 2010 Movers and Shakers Award from the Student Activities Office; the award recognizes the student organization that has “gone above and beyond in its impact on the PSU community during the past school year.”
  • The department’s Social Work Student Award Reception was held May 3. The reception included initiation of this year’s Phi Alpha Honor Society members, student awards, and a new NASW pinning ceremony with agency field instructors for our graduating seniors. In addition, Martha Bolduc, MSW from the Veterans Home in Tilton, was honored as this year’s Outstanding Field Instructor.
  • Stephen Gorin and Cynthia Moniz were invited participants to the 2010 Social Work Congress held in Washington, DC. The congress was sponsored by 12 leading national social work organizations and associations to establish 10 imperatives for the profession. Ann Widger, BSW, an alumna of our program who now works in the White House, was an invited panelist.
  • Stephen Gorin published “Does Health Insurance Matter: Health Beyond Universal Coverage” in the May edition of Health & Social Work, Vol 35, No.2.
  • Scott Meyer presented a paper co-authored with Leo Sandy: “Disturbing the Peace: A Life Sentence of Critical Thinking” at the Southwestern Social Science Association Annual Conference in Houston, TX. He also coordinated and moderated a panel “Teaching Students About Ethical Issues in Aging Across the Lifespan” for our field instructor workshop this semester.
  • Christine Rine received approval for a new online course, Child Welfare & Family Services, which will be offered this summer. She also worked with NH-DCYF and the Public Relations office to create a brochure for our Child Welfare Tuition Partnership program.

Spring 2010 Convocation and Commencements

Date: May 4th, 2010
To: The Faculty of Plymouth State University
From: Julie N. Bernier, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Come Celebrate our Students’ Success!!

Students have told us how much more meaningful their commencement ceremony is when YOU are there to celebrate with them! Please come and help make this a day to remember for our students!

Graduate Commencement will be held Saturday, May 15th, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. in Foley Gymnasium. If you are not a member of the platform party we ask that you assemble in the track area at 9:30 a.m. where a section will be designated for robing. Everyone is invited to a pre-commencement reception at 8:45 a.m. which will also be in Foley Gymnasium.

Spring Convocation will be held on Friday, May 21st, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. in the Foley Gymnasium. Convocation is the presentation of Senior Awards; if you are not a member of the platform party we ask that you assemble in the track area at 3:30 p.m. where a section will be designated for robing, prior to the processional. There will be a reception immediately following Convocation in the Foley Gym which you are welcome to attend.

Undergraduate Commencement will be held on Saturday, May 22nd, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. on the Currier Memorial Field (weather permitting). All information is online: www.plymouth.edu/commencement.

You are invited to join the senior class officers and the graduates in a tradition started years ago where the graduates meet at the Hartman Union Building Courtroom at 8:30 a.m. to walk together to the P.E. (If heavy rain, graduates & faculty meet at 9:15 a.m. at their assigned locations and do not do the traditional walk from HUB.) If you are not a member of the platform party we ask that you assemble behind the P.E. Center (a tent & refreshments will be provided) by 9:15 a.m. You will need to form two parallel lines in marching order, behind the PE Center in front of the graduating students.

Attention Faculty!! New this year at Commencement!!

When entering the PE Center area via the traditional walk down from HUB, faculty will not break off towards the right to enter the bottom floor of the PE Center. Instead faculty will continue to march to the left of the PE Center, proceed up and around the Center, ending up outside at the back of the PE Center under a newly erected tent. The tent will have some refreshments available prior to the commencement ceremony. Faculty will be lining up outside, by the tent, in front of the students, instead of lining up inside the track room. Alice O’Connor will be facilitating the lineup.

At the conclusion of the recessional, we ask that you stay in two lines and applaud the students as they proceed out. This is a way to acknowledge the special relationship between you and students at PSU.

Important Reporting Information: In case of inclement weather, the commencement will move inside to one of three sites; Foley Gymnasium, HUB, and Silver; we ask that departments report to the specific sites as follows:

FOLEY GYMNASIUM
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Education
  • Health & Human Performance
  • Social Work
HUB COURTROOM
  • Arts
  • Atmospheric Science, & Chemistry
  • Biology
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Environmental Science, & Policy
  • Humanities
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Language & Linguistics
  • Library
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
SILVER CENTER
  • English
  • Music, Theatre & Dance
  • Social Science

April 2010

April 28th, 2010 by Noelle

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
April 7, 2010

What a glorious start we’ve had to Spring. I hope you will all take a few moments from your busy schedules to walk our campus this week and enjoy the budding trees and the magnolias that are in full bloom.

As we near the end of the semester I want to take a moment to thank you for all that you do on behalf of our students. The last few weeks of the academic year often get so hectic, we sometimes forget to stop what we are doing and look around us at all the wonderful work that is happening. Soon students will be performing, presenting research, reading poetry, publishing works, and exhibiting art. We will soon be honoring their achievements and rejoice in seeing them reach their milestones. This is a time of year to reflect on why we are here and to join in the celebrations. These occasions are what it’s all about. Enjoy!

Distinguished Teaching Awards

Just a reminder, the Distinguished Teaching Award recipients will be named immediately following the May faculty meeting. Please plan to attend and celebrate with your colleagues.

News from Academic Affairs

Art

  • Yankee Magazine recently published a review of the show, “Mirare,” which was on exhibit at the St. Anselm’s Chapel Art Center, and featured Tom Driscoll as one of 3 featured artists. With an underlying “formal elegance,” the works displayed in the exhibit “create an opportunity for investigating the livelihood of the mind and heart, challenging the ways we appreciate, or derive meaning from, a work of art.” Congratulations to Tom!
  • Annette Mitchell presented two lectures at Pease Public Library in February using Lamson Learning Center’s database, ArtStor, as a visual resource. The titles of her presentations were “Humor in Art” and “The Nature of Seeing.” Annette exhibited work at the 9th “Prints of The Year: What’s New in New Hampshire Printmaking” this month at Franklin Pierce Law Center in Concord, NH and won the Best of Show Award at Kimball-Jenkins Arts and Arrangements Show this past month, also in Concord, NH.
  • The spring session of the Afterschool Arts class is currently underway with 22 children, grades K-4 exploring the theme of “Outerspace through Visual Art” for a 6-week session every Wednesday afternoon. Afterschool Art is a community service and outreach initiative of the Art Education Program where PSU art education majors assist a certified art educator to provide high quality art enrichment activities to children in the Plymouth area. The Art Education Program is making plans to expand the program to older children as part of a partnership with the Friends of the Arts, Pemi Youth Center, and the Plymouth Park and Rec’s A+ program.
  • Catherine Amidon has been appointed curator of the Museum of the White Mountains.

Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry

  • Jim Koermer was recently appointed to a 3-year term on the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Intelligent Transportation System/Surface Transportation Committee, which examines new technologies and improved methods for weather support of ground transportation. For the AMS, he was also appointed to a 4-year term to be a member of the Committee of Judges under the AMS Commissioner for Education and Human Resources. This committee evaluates applicants for AMS Freshman Scholarships and other AMS named undergraduate scholarship programs.
  • Jeremiah Duncan gave an invited presentation in March entitled “Nanoscale silver: Current knowledge and data gaps in the environmental, health, and safety data” in the Nanotechnology and the Environment: Emphasis on Green Nanotechnology session at the American Chemical Society Fall 2010 National Meeting in San Francisco.
  • In February, Jeremiah Duncan served as an invited member of a panel to discuss the use of pesticides in lawn care. The panel discussion was part of an event sponsored by Common Ground (Plymouth State University’s environmental and social justice student organization) and The Leah Collective (a local environmental activist group concerned with the use of lawn pesticides and herbicides in New Hampshire), which included a showing of the film “A Chemical Reaction .” The event was held the night before, and in preparation for, a hearing in the New Hampshire House of Representatives on HB1456, which would establish a state committee to study herbicides and pesticides and their alternatives in residential areas.
  • During spring break, Dennis Machnik traveled to Rhode Island with the portable planetarium. In five days at four schools (Western Hills Middle School, Bain Middle School, Eden Park Elementary and Matunuck Elementary), he did 39 presentations to over 1,000 K-8 students.

Biological Sciences

  • Chris Chabot gave an invited presentation in March at the University of New Hampshire Psychology Department, entitled “Biological rhythms: from molecules to movements (and beyond!).”

College of Graduate Studies

  • Cheryl Baker was invited to speak on “Aspects of High Quality Professional Development” at the New Hampshire Association of Middle Level Educators’ annual conference. Sixty educators from three states attended the conference, the focus of which was advocacy for the educational needs of the young adolescent.
  • Blake Allen, Director of the Pakistani Educators Leadership institute just returned from Pakistan and India. Allen led a team of six NH educators at a five-day conference in New Delhi, India on “Cross-Cultural Explorations: Examining Educational Leadership within the Context of Civil Society.” Indian and Pakistani educators participated (some in person and some virtually). The event was hosted by the Pakistani Educational Leadership Project at PSU, www.pelinstitute.org, and funded by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Following the five day conference in New Delhi, Allen travelled to Pakistan for continued assessment of the institute and planning of future PELI cohorts.

Counselor Education and School Psychology

  • Gail Mears, along with co-presenter Dr. Linda Barclay, gave the following presentation in March: “Clinical Training Strategies in Field Supervision: From Assessment to Effective Treatment Planning” for the American Counseling Association Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, PA.
  • K. Hridaya Hall has been invited to share her knowledge and research findings related to mindfulness in counselor preparation at a Mindful Educators group gathering at Keene State College on April 5th.
  • Gary Goodnough has co-authored two book chapters in the recently released book “Transforming the School Counseling Profession.” The first chapter, written with Dr. Rachelle Perusse of the University of Connecticut, is titled, “Developmental classroom guidance.” The second chapter, “Systemic, data-driven practice and programming for equity” was written with Dr. Vivian Lee of the College Board.

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • Registration is now open for the annual meeting of the Northern Forest Higher Education Resource Network (NFHERN) on June 1 & 2 at the Mountain View Grand Resort in Whitefield, NH. PSU faculty are encouraged to join this gathering of academic, community, and private sector leaders to explore the role of higher education in the vitality of rural communities from the Adirondacks to Nova Scotia. See http://nfhern.org for more details.
  • “Protecting the Forest,” an exhibition devoted to interpreting the history of the Weeks Act, the federal legislation that made possible National Forests in the eastern US, is showing at the Silver Center for the Arts. The exhibition is a result of research and collaboration with Marcia Schmidt Blaine (PSU History), Catherine Amidon (PSU Drerup Gallery), Linda Upham Bornstein (Center for Rural Partnerships and Social Science), Thad Guldbrandsen (Center for Rural Partnerships), and other PSU and off-campus partners. Visit the exhibition online at: http://www.plymouth.edu/gallery/weeks-act/
  • As part of the Weeks Act Centennial Lecture Series, the Center for Rural Partnerships hosted a number of speakers this month:
    • Rebecca Weeks Sherrill More (Brown University), “The Impact of North Country Community and Collaboration in the Weeks Act of 1911.”
    • Mark Okrant (PSU Social Science), “Two Centuries of Tourism in the White Mountains: A Region Comes Full Circle.”
    • Char Miller (Pomona College), “Making the National Forests National: The Weeks Act and the Expansion of Federal Forestry.”
    • Linda Upham Bornstein (Center for Rural Partnerships),” Working Forests: From Market Revolution to Industrialization.”
    • Marcia Schmidt Blaine (PSU History), “Saving the Mountains: Joseph B. Walker, Phillip Ayers, and the Weeks Act of 1911.”
      During his visit with the Center for Rural Partnerships, Char Miller (Pomona College) also participated in PSU classes, held special seminars with PSU students and faculty, and addressed groups of off-campus partners at the White Mountain National Forest Headquarters and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests in Concord.
  • Ben Amsden participated in the annual meeting of the Northern Forest Tourism Network in St, Johnsbury, Vermont. The Network consists of regional leaders in tourism attempting to build larger collaborations that will ultimately benefit regional tourism throughout the Northern Forest Region.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen chaired a panel on university engagement and served as discussant at the annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology. Presenters on the panel included Kate Donahue and colleagues from the University of Maine-Fort Kent, UNH, Appalachian State University, the University of Memphis, and the University of Arizona.

Criminal Justice

  • David Mackey presented a paper titled “Saturday night and I ain’t got no money: Will the recession spark a crime wave in New Hampshire?” and a second paper co-authored with Michael Smith of Saint Anselm College “Don’t needle me: Rating the intrusiveness and reasonableness of drug-related searches” at the annual meeting of the Eastern Sociological Society recently held in Boston, MA.
  • Mark Fischler has been appointed to the editorial review board for the “Journal of Integral Theory and Practice,” a SUNY Press publication. He also spoke at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference on the Supreme Court Case of Kennedy v. Louisiana.

Education

  • The North Country Teacher Certification Program (Irene Mosedale, Coordinator) received a $75,210 grant from the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund to provide stipends to students during their student teaching semester in the spring of 2010.
  • Marcel Lebrun presented two full-day trainings March 12th and 16th to the Franklin School District on “Response to Intervention, Tiered Behavior Support Model.”
  • Kathleen Norris presented a retreat workshop to the staff of The Bridge House and The Hunter School on the hierarchy of needs.

Environmental Science and Policy

  • Mary Ann McGarry was one of six NH educators who attended the five-day PELI conference in New Delhi, India (see Blake Allen, CoGS above). At the conference, McGarry presented on developing effective environmental education projects and moderated a session on the environment focused on water issues. She also worked with the co-director of the Writing Project, Gail Bourn, to facilitate meaningful reflection and help Pakistani, Indian, and American educators turn their learning into meaningful follow-up cross-cultural projects. The group visited schools, significant heritage and environmental sites, and was hosted by the High Commissioner of Pakistan, on March 23rd, on Pakistan Day, a celebration which commemorates the passing of the Lahore Resolution in 1940 when the separate nation of Pakistan was created for the Muslims.
  • Mark Turski was appointed to the advisory board of the Journal for College Science Teaching. The Journal of College Science Teaching (JCST), is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary periodical published by the National Science Teachers Association.

Health and Human Performance

  • Cheryl Coker gave two presentations at the American Alliance of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance conference. The first was titled, “Intervention Strategies for Performance Enhancement;” the second was a research presentation, “Practice Schedules and Putting Accuracy.”
  • Liesl Lindley, current President of the NH Athletic Trainers’ Association (NHATA), testified before the NH Senate Commerce, Labor and Consumer Protection Committee on March 4th in support of proposed new legislation (SB423) that will create health insurance reimbursement for licensed athletic trainer rehabilitation services. The legislation has since passed through the NH Senate and is now under discussion in the NH House of Representatives.

Lamson Learning Commons

  • On March 9th, Michael Davidson, Information Technologist II, Jennifer Wynne Green, Art Librarian, and Robert Fitzpatrick, Emerging Technologies Librarian, all of Lamson Library & Learning Commons, joined with Gabrielle V. L. Reed, Head of Access Services at the Mass College of Art and Design, and Carol Will of UMass Amherst Learning Commons, to present “Common Sense and Technology: A Library Usability Experience.” The event was part of the Northeast Regional Computing Program’s (NERCOMP) annual conference in Providence, Rhode Island, and discussed website usability, testing, and assessment techniques used to move toward a better achievement of instruction goals.
  • Jennifer Green organized and moderated the session “Utilizing Blogs to Improve and Market Resources” at the Visual Resources Association (VRA) Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA, March 17th.
  • David A. Beronä presented a paper, Adult Storytelling: An Exploration of Woodcut Novels and Wordless Graphic Novels,” at the New Hampshire Institute of Art on March 24, 2010.
  • Elaine S. Allard served as a Consultant on “Implementing a Learning Commons” at the State University of New York at Cortland, March 8-9, 2010.
  • Anne Lebreche welcomed members of Cub Scout Pack #56 from Plymouth and #59 from Bristol to the Lamson Library and Learning Commons. The Wolves, Bears and Webelos completed a badge activity where they were to find the news on the day of their birth. The Scouts learned how to use The New York Times Digital Archives, took a tour of the library building, and talked about how librarians are part of our “helping” community.

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting presented a paper, “From Isolation to Community for Teachers in Low-Incidence Settings,” at the 44th annual International TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) conference, held in Boston in March. The paper examined findings from Whiting’s on-going research on low-incidence English language teaching and learning.

Mathematics

  • Emily Ricard, Associate Director of the NH-Impact Center, presented “Integrating Smartboards in the Mathematics Classroom” at a Mathematics Department Seminar on February 23rd. She is currently offering Smartboard professional development at Concord High School. She also presented “Smartboard 101 – Special Topics in High School Mathematics” at the New Hampshire Teachers of Mathematics Annual Spring Conference on April 6th.
  • “Using wikis to enhance collaboration” was presented by Dana Ernst at the PSU Spotlight on Technology 2010, Thursday, April 1, 2010.
  • On April 6th the New Hampshire Teachers of Mathematics are hosting their Annual Spring Conference at SERESC in Bedford, NH. Nine PSU students will attend accompanied by John Donovan and Dana Ernst.
  • Barbara Boschmans was conference, program, and exhibit chair for the NHTM conference on April 6th.
  • Brian Beaudrie was the keynote speaker at the NHTM Annual Spring Conference on April 6th. Brian is also currently offering professional development to middle and high school teachers in Merrimack Valley.
  • Natalya Vinogradova presented “Algebra and Geometry: Two sides of the same coin” at the NHTM Conference on April 6th.
  • Bill Roberts presented “Including Proof in the Geometry Curriculum” at the NHTM Conference on April 6th.
  • The Pre-K-16 Numeracy Action Plan for the 21st Century was released on April 6th by the NH-Impact Center and the New Hampshire Department of Education. This publication was created over the last year under the leadership of Brian Beaudrie, Director of the NH-Impact Center and Emily Ricard, Associate Director of the NH-Impact Center. More information can be found at: http://oz.plymouth.edu/~bboschmans/QLAP/.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Kathleen Arecchi worked as a Casting Director for the Papermill Theatre (Lincoln, NH) at the NE Theatre Conference “Combined Auditions” held in Natick, MA. (March 13-15) Three hundred seventy-five musical theatre auditioners were selected from applicants throughout the US to perform before representatives of 30+ theatres.
  • Jonathan Santore has had two works accepted for publication by Yelton Rhodes Music in Los Angeles. Both works, “Kalevala Fragments” and “The Owl and the Pussycat,” were originally written for the New Hampshire Master Chorale, directed by Dan Perkins.
  • Amanda Whitworth performed as a guest artist in the Amy Marshall Dance Company’s 10th Anniversary Season at the Ailey Citicorp Theater in New York City.
  • Carleen Graff just returned from the MTNA National Conference in Albuquerque. While there she served as the Eastern Division Certification Commissioner and presented at two different Certification sessions. She is in her second year of a two-year term.
  • Constance Chesebrough helped judge the piano competition held in conjunction with the Contemporary Piano Festival held at PSU on Saturday, March 13. She also presented a workshop entitled “Sharing the Music – Collaborating Musicians” and was assisted by high school musicians Angela Yeo, violin, and Katie Roukes, piano, and collegiate musicians Mark Hecox, saxophone, and Alyssa Costa, piano. As president of the New Hampshire Music Teachers Association, Ms. Chesebrough recently attended the Music Teachers National Association convention in Albuquerque, NM, and represented PSU at the Collegiate Chapter reception and forum.

Psychology

  • Paul Fedorchak is reviewing a chapter entitled, “Creating Your Cultural Bridge to Dose, Data, and Scientific Knowledge,” which is to appear in a book on Radiation Risk Communication.

Social Science

  • Stacey Yap presented “Rejuvenating the Past to Rethink the Future: Historic Preservation in Vietnam,” on March 9. The presentation focused on the French colonial buildings, especially villas in Dalat and Hanoi, as threatened sites in the era of new Vietnam. Stacey is organizing a panel on historic preservation in Asia in the upcoming Fall meeting of the New England Chapter of the Association for Asian Studies.
  • Kate Donahue was an invited speaker at the SUNY-Buffalo Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy. Her lecture was titled “What Can Be Learned From the Trial of Zacarias Moussaoui?” She also gave a paper on “The Anthropology of an EcoHouse” at the Northeastern Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, held at the University of Buffalo. She also participated in a panel organized by Thad Guldbrandsen of the PSU Center for Rural Partnerships which was held at the Society for Applied Anthropology Annual Meeting in Merida, Mexico.
  • David Starbuck spoke at Kennett High School in North Conway, NH, about “Forensic Anthropology,” followed by a talk that evening on “Ancient Turkey” to the Society for Scholarly Dialogue at PSU. David then hosted the annual meeting of the New England Chapters of the Society for Industrial Archeology at PSU on February 27 and presented a paper on “The Temple Glassworks Revisited.” On March 11 David spoke in the series “New Hampshire at War” to the New Hampshire Historical Society. His topic was “Fighting on the Frontier in the French and Indian War.” Also in March, David’s book “Excavating the Sutlers’ House: Artifacts of the British Armies in Fort Edward and Lake George” was published by University Press of New England. (This is David’s seventh book from UPNE.)

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin presented on “the Future of Social Security” for leaders from community organizations in NH. He also spoke on Social Security for the NH State Committee on Aging, of which he is a member.
  • Scott Meyer attended the Harvard Continuing Medical Education Conference on Addictions, in Boston, MA. As a member of the NH Commission on the Status of Men, he was a co-contributor to the third biennial report.
  • Cynthia Moniz attended the Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors Annual Conference and Meeting in Atlanta, GA. She and Stephen Gorin participated in Pearson’s Connections Forums designed to gather best practices for incorporating CSWE’s new accreditation standards and develop their Connecting Core Competencies Series and MySocialWorkLab. She presented the BSW Student of the Year Award at the NH-NASW Annual Dinner held in Concord, and was re-appointed to the chapter’s PACE Committee for a new 3-year term. She is also assisting in the development of a new international travel course for summer 2011 to the Dominican Republic.
  • Christine Rine was nominated to run for a seat on the NH-NASW Board of Directors. She is working with the Whole Village to explore possible service learning projects, and developing an online/blended summer course.

Writing Center

Along with director Jane Weber, six student consultants from the Writing Center (Amanda Cook, Michael Eddy, Ashley Schena, Jenny Wyatt, Abbey Filiault, and Kristen DiMatteo) will attend the annual North East Writing Center Association’s annual conference at Boston University on April 10th.

March 2010

March 28th, 2010 by Noelle

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
March 3, 2010

Spotlight on Faculty using Technology

On March 31st from 3:15 pm – 6:00 pm there will be a series of presentations by faculty who are using technology in innovative ways. Eight faculty members are currently scheduled to make presentations and there is room for a few more. If you are interested, please contact Ellen Murphy, Director of Online Education ( emmurphy3@mail.plymouth.edu ). Presentations are approximately 10-15 minutes.

Distinguished Awards Nominations

This year’s Distinguished Teaching Awards nomination process has begun! As you know, we have two undergraduate distinguished awards: The Distinguished Teaching Award (for full-time faculty teaching in the undergraduate program) and The Distinguished Adjunct Teaching Award (for part-time faculty teaching in the undergraduate program), and the Distinguished Graduate Teaching Award (for faculty teaching in the graduate programs).

I encourage you to be a part of this year’s selection process by nominating worthy individuals. The links below will take you to the 3 nomination forms:


Nominations must be submitted electronically no later than 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 15th, 2010.

Conference Opportunity

Funding is available for up to five faculty members to attend the Conference on Instructional Technologies (CIT) will be held from Tuesday, May 25, 2010 to Friday, May 28, 2010 at SUNY Plattsburg. What conference attendees are saying: “year after year, this is the most valuable conference I attend, and the least expensive. What I particularly like about this conference is the focus on teaching and learning.” The cost is $250 for conference registration and includes meals, and $40 night for a room (on campus).

This year’s conference is offering six tracks:

  • Health Education
  • Learning Spaces
  • Global and Mobile
  • Open Everything
  • Balancing Pedagogy and Technology
  • K-16 Pipeline: Plugging the Leaks

Please contact my office if you are interested in attending. Support for five individuals is available on a first come first serve basis.

Conference registration information is here: http://guest.cvent.com/EVENTS/Info/Summary.aspx?e=0ed36952-dd93-4e8e-b214-41c1ef3cc9c6

News from Academic Affairs

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • Tom Wagner, the White Mountain National Forest Supervisor, presented “100 Years of Public Land Management,” as part of the Weeks Act Centennial Lecture Series.
  • The NFHERN (The Northern Forest Higher Education Resource Network) Steering Committee announced their second annual meeting will be held at Mountain View Grand Resort Hotel in Whitefield, NH on June 1 & 2, 2010. The theme of the meeting will be “Higher Education’s Role in the Northern Forest’s Sustainable Future. PSU faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend. Stay tuned for further announcements from Fran Belcher.
  • Tom Evans (Graduate Assistant) submitted a report on community-scale biomass resources to the Biomass District Heating Working Group.
  • Ben Amsden, in partnership with UVM Extension, organized and facilitated two workshops on “Risk Management in Agritourism.” These workshops, held at the Farm and Forest Expo in Manchester and the VT Farms Association annual meeting in Woodstock, Vermont, were designed to help farmers navigate the issues of insurance, liability and risk that arise from farm-based agritourism activities. Over 60 farmers representing nearly all facets of regional agritourism attended the workshops.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen was a panelist in the Forum for the Future discussion on “A Candid Analysis of NH’s Future by Its Emerging Young Leaders,” in Bedford.

College of University Studies

  • Patrick Cate gave a presentation and training for the academic services staff at Roger Williams University in Rhode Island on using the targeted academic advising model (developed here at PSU). The training consisted of a 2-hour class followed by a 2-hour practice/case study session. He has been invited back to be one of their faculty week speakers in August in order to train their faculty on how to use this advising technique.

Counselor Education and School Psychology

  • Gail Mears represented the American Mental Health Counselors Association at the annual conference for the American Association of State Counseling Boards.

Criminal Justice

  • Francis Williams presented and chaired a session on “What we have learned about online learning in Criminal Justice and Criminology.” His presentation was titled “Student Perceptions of Online Criminal Justice Courses.” This mixed methods study investigated how certain features of online Criminal Justice courses contributed to learning in an asynchronous online learning environment based in student perceptions.

Frost School of Continuing and Professional Studies

  • Linda Hammond presented at the NH School Administrators Association Best Practices Conference on Education for All Children, using Lego elements as a professional development tool in October.

Global Education Office

  • Twenty-eight PSU students began their spring semester studying abroad in Austria, Australia, England, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, and Spain. One student will be studying shipboard with the Semester at Sea program stopping at ports in Japan, China, Viet Nam, India, Mauritius, South Africa, Ghana and Brazil.
  • The workshop series, “Job Search Strategies in a Tough Economy” developed by Ruth DeCotis was published in “Campus Career Counselor,” a publication journal for college and university career services professionals.

Health and Human Performance

  • Plymouth State University’s Health and Human Performance Department was well represented at the recent Eastern District Association of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Convention in Rye, NY. The following faculty and students were recognized during the convention:
    • Irene Cucina was awarded the Presidential Medallion for her service and assistance to the Eastern District President.
    • Cheryl Coker was selected as the Margaret Paulding Lecturer and gave the following lecture: “Long Term Female Athlete Development – From Playground to Podium.” Cheryl also received an EDA Acknowledgment Award. She also presented, “Skill Analysis: More Than Meets the Eye.”
    • Louise McCormack received an EDA Acknowledgment Award.
    • Morgan O’Connell ’10 received the Robert M. Pate Scholarship, and was one of two recipients from New Hampshire for the Outstanding Future Professional Award and completed her term as the Student Representative on the EDA Executive Board. Morgan should be commended for her service to Eastern District and her accomplishments as a student and young professional.
    • Morgan and Adam Durkee ’10 presented “Reduce your Budget, Reuse Your Unwanted, Recyele and Go Green in PE.”
    • In addition to the awards, the following faculty are on the Executive Board of the Eastern District for 2010-2011: Lynn Johnson completed her term as President of Eastern District and is now the Past-President; Irene Cucina is the EDA Representative to the AAHPERD Board of Governors; and Barbara McCahan is the Vice President of Physical Activity and Recreation.
  • Mardie Burckes-Miller and the Health Education majors and students in the Health and Wellness Club implemented PSU’s 13th Love Your Body Week as part of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week on Feb. 22- Feb. 27. Burckes-Miller presented “Balancing the Teeter Totter: Eating Disorders and Obesity Prevention” at the Eastern District Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. She also presented “Balancing Obesity Prevention and Eating Disorders for Youth at Risk at the National Youth at Risk Conference in Savannah Georgia.

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting was invited to serve on the Fulbright Scholarship National Screening Committee for English Language Teaching Assistantships. Whiting and other members of the committee reviewed applications and then met at the Institute of International Education in New York City in December to finalize the award recipients.

Mathematics

  • Dana Ernst gave a presentation on January 15th, “On the cyclically fully commutative elements of Coxeter groups,” at the session on Discrete Mathematics at the Joint Mathematics Meetings 2010 in San Francisco, CA
  • John Donovan is collaborating with Mrs. Cathy Crane, 5th grade teacher at PES (Plymouth Elementary School), to plan a project for the 2nd Math Masters program at PES. Math Masters is an innovative collaboration that brings students from different grades together as investigation teams. Teachers devise and supervise the investigative projects with the support of parent volunteers and administrators. Teams pursue their investigations in six one-hour blocks over the course of 6 weeks.
  • Math Department faculty have had the following publications and presentation:
    • Beaudrie, B., Ricard, E., et. al. (2009) The Numeracy Action Plan: The Case for Quantitative Literacy in the State of New Hampshire. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education and the New Hampshire Department of Education, 168 pages.
    • Beaudrie, Brian, and Boschmans, Barbara. Developing Quantitative Literacy. AMATYC (American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges) National Conference, Las Vegas NV November 2009.
    • Boschmans, Barbara and Beaudrie, Brian. Learning with Geoboards. NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) Regional, Minneapolis MN, November 2009.
    • Beaudrie, Brian. New Hampshire’s Numeracy Action Plan: The Case for Quantitative Literacy. 12th Annual Best Practices Conferences on Education for All Children, Concord NH, October 2009.
    • Beaudrie, Brian. Developing Quantitative Literacy in grades K-8. Plymouth Elementary School Professional Development Workshop, Plymouth NH, October 2009.
    • Boschmans, Barbara and Beaudrie, Brian. Exploring Mathematics on a Geoboard. NCTM Regional, Boston MA, October 2009.
    • Beaudrie, Brian, Boschmans, Barbara, and Ricard, Emily. Developing a Plan for Quantitative Literacy. NCTM Regional, Boston MA, October 2009.
    • Beaudrie, Brian. Developing Quantitative Literacy. NCPDD (North Country Professional Development Day), Whitefield NH, October 2009.
    • Beaudrie, Brian. The History of the Transition Project. Topics in Applied College (TAC) Mathematics Workshop, Concord NH, August 2009.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Gary Corcoran was the guest conductor of the high school Honor Band at the Green Mountain Music Festival held February 5, in Rutland VT.
  • On Saturday, February 27th, Holly Oliver, music education program coordinator, along with the assistance of the PSU Collegiate chapter of the Music Educators National Conference, sponsored a professional development day for music education majors and area music teachers. Sessions were presented to approximately 60 people on topics including Starting a Guitar Program, World Music Drumming, Integrating Academics into Elementary General Music, A New Approach to Rhythm Reading, The Work of Edwin Gordon, and Planning and Preparation for a High School Musical.
  • Beth Cox was the host and Coordinator of the NH Professional Theatre Association Auditions and Job Fair on February 20, 2010 held in Silver. This marks the third year PSU has hosted this day-long event which was developed through a partnership with the NH Department of Cultural Resources, the NH Professional Theatre Association and PSU. Sixteen (16) theatre companies auditioned 81 performers and interviewed 33 individuals for summer and full-time work. Matt Kizer developed the website materials; Amanda Whitworth Andrew Morrissey, a PSU alum, served as the audition accompanist; Kathleen Arecchi represented an NHPTA member, North Country Center for the Arts, as a casting consultant.
  • Carleen Graff gave a piano master class at the Nashua Community Music School on February 20. One of the teachers who had students performing was Angela Olszta ‘05.
  • Dan Perkins accompanied 4 students to the American Choral Directors Association convention in Philadelphia. His chamber ensemble, Trio Veritas, performed three concerts in Maine and New Hampshire.

Psychology

  • Brian Healy has a new publication ‘’ The Effect of Attentional Control and Heart-Period Variability on Negative Affect and Trait Anxiety” that will appear in the Journal of General Psychology, Vol. 137 (2) pp 1-11.

Social Science

  • Katherine Donahue, Anthropology, was co-organizer and chair of a panel which honored the recently deceased French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss. The panel, titled “Lévi-Strauss, Europe, and the Ends of Anthropology,” was selected as a Presidential Session, and was part of the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, in December, 2009.
  • Stacey G. H. Yap gave a talk on February 17th to 29 third graders at Plymouth Elementary School on “Chinese New Year Customs and Traditions.” This talk coincides with the Chinese New Year which starts on Feb. 14th this year (to Feb. 28th). The 3rd graders celebrated with readings of Chinese culture, food and art projects and were eager to share what they have done with Stacey. She has also completed a book review for the Journal of Women, Politics and Policy. The book she reviewed is titled Empowering Migrant Women. Why Agency and Rights are not Enough by Leah Brionnes (Ashgate, 2009).
  • Krisan Evenson, adjunct faculty member in the Social Sciences Department, would like to extend her thanks to the PSU community members who generously donated wool yarn for the benefit of students in her winterim course on citizen-to-citizen diplomacy, called “Piecework for Peacework.” The second crate of handmade goods has just left the building! The course centered on Afghanistan; beyond meeting academic requirements, students (several for the first time) crocheted vests, hats and afghans for donation to the Afghan people, in a hands-on, international service learning experience.

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin’s article, “Health Care Reform and Older Adults,” was published in Health & Social Work, 35 (1) February 2010.
  • Scott Meyer reviewed a newly published textbook by Routledge, “Human Behavior in the Social Environment 2/E,” by A. T. Rogers; an excerpt of his review was included in the cover.
  • Cynthia Moniz is a member of the Service Learning Task Force this semester. She has also been working on the development of a new service learning international travel course for next year.
  • Christine Rine has developed a new brochure for our Child Welfare (IV-E) Partnership with DCYF. As a result of her work as a member of the Academic Technology Advisory group (ATAG), she has piloted the use of Moodle vs. Blackboard for two spring courses and is reviewing the findings from focus groups re: MLS (Learning Management Systems). She is also exploring service learning opportunities for her courses.

February 2010

February 28th, 2010 by Noelle

Monthly Report to the Faculty
Provost Julie Bernier
February 3, 2010

I can’t tell you what a joy it is to see a vibrant active campus now that faculty and students have returned. Welcome back!

Faculty- Student Recruitment Program

The Admissions process for Fall 2010 is largely behind us, but now the real work begins. Students have applied and have been admitted to PSU and now is the time when they are making decisions about where they will attend. How do we impact their choices? What can we do to ensure students admitted, become students enrolled?

At the Council of Chairs Retreat last week, we brainstormed ways that faculty could impact our fall new-student enrollment. We know from the experience of some departments who already call admitted students, that personal contact with faculty is very effective in helping students make the decision to attend PSU. Parents and students have told me how much it meant to them that the Department Chair (or advisor, or faculty member) actually took the time to call them. As a result of the conversations at the Chair’s retreat, we have decided to develop an institution-wide faculty calling program. Over the next couple months, students will be deciding whether to come to PSU for their education. No one can help them make that decision better than the faculty who will teach them.

We live in different times. We can no longer expect that the Admissions office is solely responsible for recruiting our incoming class. The enrollment process has to be our collective responsibility.

This week we will be working on the logistics of the program that will take place over the next 3-4 weeks.
We will be asking for department faculty volunteers to sign up for one of more evenings. We recognize everyone is not comfortable making calls like this. That’s ok. What I think many of you will find, is that this is a lot of fun.

More details will follow in the next week. But in general, the plan is that we’ll come together as a group, (we’ll feed you) and provide you with talking points and student contact information. Following that gathering, faculty may either call from their offices or call from a bank of phones that will be provided. This is an exciting new initiative, an opportunity to “meet” our future students and an opportunity for you to have an impact on who the students are that will enroll in your future classes.

I’d like to thank the Chairs for their leadership in this initiative. It’s a very important one. I thank you all in advance for your participation.

Update on Academic Affairs reorganization

At the December meeting I promised I would give an update this month regarding plans for reorganization.

I’d like to thank everyone who has been involved in conversations over the last two years about this process. We’ve discussed a few different models and have debated the best directions for PSU. In our most recent conversations we debated the number of colleges (three and four were discussed). After much thought and in consideration of financial constraints, I’ve decided to move forward with three colleges.

Dennis points out the cost of creating new colleges could be expensive. This would be true if we simply added new positions requiring new salaries and benefits rather than taking steps to re-allocate and use existing resources. It also assumes there is no return on the investment, which of course, would not provide the full picture. It’s true, if funding were not an issue, we would have moved forward this year with all three colleges. Because we do need to be mindful of costs, and because we must find ways to move forward without causing financial distress, we’ve had to move more slowly.

You will recall, the reason we chose the College of Business Administration to be the first College is because they were largely structured as a college already. This was a department with 40 FTE faculty and 25% of the entire undergraduate student body. As such, they already had a fulltime chair, and numerous other individuals with release time to provide support for such a large department. From a cost standpoint, the structure was largely in place. We did not have to create new positions to establish the CoBA and the costs were therefore minimal. This has allowed a shifting of responsibilities to free up the Dean to focus in new areas. In time, will there be additional resources needed? Yes, but those will be incremental and will occur only as new revenues are realized and can cover the additional expenses.

The reason we have not moved forward more quickly on the others is because, here too, we need to do so in a way that has minimal impact on the budget. I assure you, this can, and will be done.

It’s easy to look at something like re-organization as an expense that should be avoided, particularly at times like these. In making decisions like this, we have to take a longer view at what is best for the institution and what will put PSU in the best position for success. I assure you, moving to Colleges will be a small investment in PSU’s future that will pay great dividends. We have already seen evidence of this with our first Dean in the way he has been successful in developing new programs, new streams of revenue, partnerships, donors, and sponsorships. He has more than covered the cost of moving to a College, literally 40-times over.

Breakdown of future colleges:

College of Business Administration

  • BS Programs in:
    • Accounting
    • Business Administration
    • Finance
    • Management
    • Marketing

Master of Business Administration

  • with certificates in:
    • Healthcare Administration
    • International Business
    • Investment and Finance
    • Organizational Communication
    • Small Business and Entrepreneurship
    • Strategic Marketing Management
    • The Human Side of Enterprise
  • Small Business Institute

College of Arts & Sciences

  • Art
    • Drerup Art Gallery
  • Atmospheric Sci. and Chemistry
  • Biological Sciences
  • Comm & Media Studies
  • Computer Science
  • English
  • Environmental Science and Policy
  • Languages & Linguistics
  • Mathematics
  • Music, Theatre, Dance
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Social Science
    • Center for NH Studies

College of Education, Health and Human Services

  • Counselor Ed & School Psych
  • Education
  • Criminal Justice
  • Health and Human Performance
    • Center for Active Living and
  • Healthy Communities
  • Social Work
  • Office of Teacher Certification

The Bagley Center has been renamed, the Global Education Office to reflect an increased emphasis on international programs and services. Deb Regan and Daniel Moore co-chair the International Steering Committee which is looking at everything from academic programming to issues surrounding travel courses to ensuring that PSU is prepared to provide necessary services that support international students.

The Global Education Office continues to offer services related to internships, career services, study abroad, and short-term faculty led trips.

I recently asked the Global Education Office to provide me with an update on Career Services that are provided. I was impressed with the vast array of programming and services offered and thought I would share it with you.

Career Services

Communications:

Email to students and faculty regarding services we provide at the beginning and at the end of each semester

Monthly email newsletter to campus staff and offices that provide career and academic advising outlining current market trends and resources such as videos, webinars, and workshops.

  • Title of the newsletter Career Resources: Creating a way to serve our PSU students

Semester newsletter (on line): Fall and Spring

  • Informing students of upcoming events, trends, and services

Student Advising (one on one):

  • Resume/cover letters
  • Career exploration and decision making
  • Job and internship search strategies
  • Interviewing techniques and mock interviews
  • Graduate school

    **Since July ‘09, 37 students (+ 43 alums below) have received individual advising/counseling services. This represents a decrease in student traffic (seen in our office) from July-December ’08 where we advised 104 students and alumni (sorry, we don’t have an exact breakdown for last year). Part of the reason for this is, since we didn’t have the walk-in advisor position available to us this year, we made the decision to provide more of our services (where appropriate) in group settings such as the classroom (see below). We still maintain walk-in advising hours but on a more limited basis.

Alumni: Significant Increase in number of alumni seeking career counseling and/or job search assistance (largely due to job loss): 43 appointments since July ‘09

Workshops/Presentations:

  • Campus Workshop Series: Job Search Strategies in a Tough Economy
    • Sept: Salaries: Realistic Income/Realistic Expenses
    • Oct: The Practical Job Search: The Steps for Success
    • Nov: Networking and Technology, A Rational Strategy for Job Search…and other sensible options
    • (PowerPoint slides and associated links to videos from the workshops have been uploaded to our website for continued access).
  • Group Presentations on requested career related topics for
    • Senior Seminars
    • First Year Seminars
    • Career related classes: Career Exploration, Professional Employment and Career Development
    • Student teaching classes
    • Non-traditional student luncheons
    • Transfer students
    • Campus organizations (Education Honors Society, AMA, etc)

**Number of presentations has tripled from last year, from 4 to 13 for the fall semester.

Online Resources:

  • As a result of student requests, we’ve tried to put as much helpful and easily accessible information online as we can. We continue to work with IT to expand these resources.
  • CHOICES, a career assessment tool:
    • CHOICES helps students to determine their interests, skills, and values and how they relate to careers/occupations. Students can also build a resume, outline career plans for the future, and view actual job listings. This tool contains extensive graduate school listings and scholarship information.
  • Experience/Plymouth Careers, a career management program for student registrants, first year through senior, graduate students and alumni. This system provides 24/7 access to on-line job listings (local, regional and national), internships and career exploration resources. As students progress through their years at Plymouth State, Plymouth Careers provides personalized career related resources relevant to their student status (first year, sophomore etc.).
    • direct access to over 100,000 employers, 800,000 job opportunities
    • robust career resources, optional alumni networking/mentorship, alum to alum job opportunity postings
  • Plymouth Connections: Alumni career management systems for career and job search
  • Website Videos, 25-part series by ABC Good Morning America’s, Tory Johnson. Designed specifically for college students and alumni, each video segment offers a detailed, step-by-step guide on topics ranging from networking skills and acing the interview to negotiating successfully and creating an effective online portfolio.
  • Annual Career Fair co-sponsored with the College of Business Administration, Event Planning course
  • Annual Career and Internship Fair, sponsored by our consortium, NH College and University Council
  • New Initiatives: Plans for spring semester:
    • Spring workshop for study away students: How to articulate your international experience in your job search (resume, cover letter, interview)
    • Producing video on behavioral interviewing (with business faculty and PSU students) to mount on website
    • Developing online ‘Webshops’ for resume writing, job search etc.

News from Academic Affairs

Art

  • Cynthia Vascak’s monotype, “I and Thou,” has been accepted in the national juried exhibition of the Jewish Women’s Artist’s Network, in collaboration with the National Caucus for Women in the Arts, for the exhibition titled, “Drawing the Line.” The exhibit runs February 5 to March 6, 2010 at The Beverly Arts Center of Chicago.
  • Liz D’Amico has five mixed media monotypes included in the juried Love, Lust & Desire exhibit at the McGowan Fine Art Gallery in Concord, NH. The show runs from February 2 – March, 2010 with an opening reception on February 5 from 5 –7pm.
  • The paintings of Tom Driscoll, along with Grace DeGennaro and Meg Brown Payson, are being featured at the Chapel Art Center at Saint Anselm College from February 4 through March 7. The opening will be on Thursday, February 4 at 6 PM. The show – Mirare – focuses on the work of 3 contemporary, abstract painters, and promises to be a truly lovely show. The Chapel Arts Center will also be hosting a gallery lecture on February 11 and a panel discussion with the artists on March 18. Contact the Chapel Arts Center for more information at ChapelArtCenter@anselm.edu.
  • Students (Jessie Carter, Katherine Clark, Zack Breen, Lindsey Tebaldi, April Deschene and Megan Elliott) and faculty (Cynthia Vascak, Liz D’Amico and Terry Downs) are exhibiting in the “Prints Of The Year” at the Franklin Pierce Law Center, 2 White Street, in Concord NH. The show runs from January 11 – April 2.
  • Annette Mitchell gave 2 lectures at the ARtel Gallery in Pensacola, Florida on January 8, 2010, addressing “Humor in Art” (which will also be presented at the Pease Public Library, Thu, Feb 11, 3-5 pm) and the “Nature of Seeing” (at Pease Thu, Feb 25, 3-5 pm). Both presentations are free and open to the public.
  • Annette also received the “Best in Show” Award from the Kimball Jenkins Gallery Art & Arrangements Exhibition held in Concord, NH through February. Her piece titled “A New Direction” combines sumi ink and foam block printing. Her book and DVD, both titled “Foam Is Where The Art Is – New Ways To Print,” are now being carried in the Nasco Art Supply Catalog, giving her worldwide distribution.

Atmospheric Science and Chemistry

  • Lourdes Avilés chaired the University Education session of the 19th Symposium on Education as part of the 90th American Meteorological Society (AMS) meeting in Atlanta, GA (January 17-21). She also participated in meetings for the AMS Board on Higher Education, the Board on Women and Minorities, and the Committee on the History of Atmospheric Sciences. Additionally she has been appointed to be part of the drafting committee for the new AMS curriculum guidelines for B.S. in Meteorology. The process was officially started at the beginning of the conference and will continue until the guidelines are approved by the AMS council in September.

Biological Sciences

  • 2009 Watson, W.H., S.Y. Schaller, and C.C. Chabot. The Relationship Between Small- and Large-scale Movements of Horseshoe Crabs in the Great Bay Estuary and Limulus Behavior in the Laboratory. In: Ecology, Behavior and Evolution of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus. D. Smith and J. Tanecredi (Eds). Klewer Academic/Plenum Press, New York.
  • 2009 C.C. Chabot. Analyzing the Way that Periodicals Report on Human Anatomy and Physiology Topics. American Physiological Society Archive (http://www.apsarchive.org/resource.cfm?submissionID=2868).

Center for Rural Partnerships

  • The Center for Rural Partnerships announced support for four faculty projects through the Coos County Outreach Initiative:
    • Mardie Burckes-Miller (Eating Disorders Institute), Project: “Coos Eating Disorders Workshop”
    • Mark Green and June Hammond Rowan (Center for the Environment), Project: “Enhancing Volunteer Monitoring on the Israel River”
    • Daniel Lee and Vedran Lelas (College of Business Administration), Project: “North Country Economic Index”
    • Mark Okrant (Social Science), Project: “A Marketing Tool for Small Lodging Properties”
  • Ben Amsden appeared on the television program “Across the Fence” with Dr. Lisa Chase of UVM Extension. “Across the Fence” is the longest-running daily farm and home television program in the country, and it airs on WCAX-TV (the CBS affiliate from Burlington, Vermont). The primary topic of discussion was agritourism, culinary tourism, and “local food” – areas which, in addition to being the fastest growing segments of the tourism industry, are of tremendous importance to the economic sustainability of New Hampshire’s rural farms.
  • New England Campus Compact accepted a proposal from Fran Belcher, Ben Amsden, and Thad Guldbrandsen for a discussion on “Developing a Rural Engagement Model for Small Rural Colleges,” at the “Higher Education and the Greater Good: Meeting the Challenges of the 21 Century” in Burlington, Vermont on April 14, 2010.
  • Tom Evans (Graduate Assistant) submitted a draft report on biomass energy and district heating resources to the Biomass/District Heating Task Force. This report provides a comprehensive review of resources that are available to help New Hampshire Communities become energy self-reliant, reduce their carbon footprint, stimulate the local economy, and improve quality of life.
  • Tom Evans, Thad Guldbrandsen, and other members of the Biomass/District Heating Community Roadmap project reviewed proposals, interviewed finalists, and selected a contractor to develop a “Community Roadmap” workbook to help communities make decisions about implementing community energy systems.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen, in collaboration with Catherine Amidon, Linda Upham-Bornstein, Marcia Schmidt Blaine, and a host of other partners (White Mountain National Forest, Weeks State Park, Appalachian Mountain Club, Moore/Huntley Productions, Forest History Society, NH Dept. of Resources and Economic Development, WhiteMountainHistory.org, the Center for the Environment, and the Institute for New Hampshire Studies) submitted a grant proposal, “White Mountain National Forest: Legacy and Lessons of a Great American Place,” to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Interpreting Americas Places program. If funded, the grant will fund the development of film clips, podcasts, publications, and other humanities content related to the Weeks Act centennial celebration and advance the goals of PSU’s White Mountains Institute.
  • Thad Guldbrandsen served as a judge for the Colebrook Academy Tillotson North Country Foundation Scholarship Competition.
  • As part of the Weeks Act Centennial Lecture Series, Mark Okrant (Social Science) presented “Two Centuries of Tourism in the White Mountains: A Region Comes Full Circle” at the Mount Washington Hotel, and Linda Upham-Bornstein (Center for Rural Partnerships) presented “New Hampshire’s Working Forests: From Market Revolution to Industrialism.”

College of Business Administration

  • Yet again, PSU students have taken first place in this year’s national Small Business Institute Project of the Year competition. This year’s award, in the General category, was won by MBA students Andrew White and Kim Lyden-Ricker who prepared their project for Compressor Solutions, LLC located in Manchester and Campton, Jeff Wright, President. CS provides energy improvement services for companies that have compressed air systems for pneumatic tools, etc. The principals wanted a growth plan to include a potential merger with a sister company providing system analysis sensors and software. The students provided them with a marketing, finance and operations plan for staffing growth in the US and Europe. The student advisor was Craig Zamzow.
  • Joining their PSU student colleagues in earning awards were Patrick Melancon and Greg Chase, MBA students, whose project garnered the 2nd place award in the SBI National POY Competition. They prepared a business plan and feasibility study for ZanAqua in Hudson, NH, James Dean, President. ZanAqua manufactures water purification systems with a patented process. The students were asked to investigate the food and beverage market for their products. The emphasis ended up in the Micro Brewery and Ice Cream markets. A business plan was submitted to the client for pursuing both markets including risks and returns on marketing investments.

Communications and Media Studies

  • Kylo-Patrick Hart’s book “Images for a Generation Doomed: Reading the Films of Gregg Araki” has been published by Lexington Books.
  • Annette Holba and Marie Baker-Ohler’s book “The Communicative Relationship Between Dialogue and Care” has been published by Cambria Press.
  • Eun-Ho Yeo’s book “Media, Health Risk, and Public Perception: Agenda Setting in West Nile Virus Outbreak” has been published by Lambert Academic Publishing.

Computer Science and Technology

  • Roger Marshall presented three papers on his bioinformatics research in December 2009: at the World Congress on Nature and Biology Inspired Computing (NABIC 09), Innovations in Computing (INC09) and Recent Advances in Mathematical Sciences Applications (RAMSA 09). He also served as the foreign dissertation evaluator for the PhD thesis of Mr. K.A. Mohamed of Alexandria University, Egypt.

Criminal Justice

  • Francis Williams will be chairing a session at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) in San Diego, CA, February 22 – 28 on ‘What We Have Learned About Distance/Online Learning.” He will also present some of his own research, “Student Perceptions of Online Criminal Justice Courses” in another session.

Education

  • Earick, Mary (2010) The Power of Play and Language on Early Childhood Racial Identity in Three US Schools. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education. Routledge: Special edition on Play. Abstract: Three transformative action research case studies conducted in three geographically diverse locations, the Northeast, Southwest and Southeast US, with children between the ages of four and seven. The case studies that are the focus of this paper were selected from studies collected between 1997 and 2007. The outcomes of each clearly identify issues signifying a relationship between race, play and language, in both student to student and teacher to student discourse. Discussion includes how critical incident logs and language events transform White teacher identities and support self-reflection. The relationships that exist between theory, practice and academic achievement in the field of racial identity development are discussed, as is the role that play-based curriculum models can have on identity consistency in early childhood classrooms. Publisher: Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal focused on critical discourse and research in diaspora, indigenous, and minority education. The journal is dedicated to researching cultural sustainability in a world increasingly consolidating under national, transnational, and global organizations. It aims to draw attention to, and learn from, the many initiatives being conducted around the globe in support of diaspora, indigenous, and minority education, which might otherwise go unnoticed.
  • Mary Cornish and Clarissa Uttley attended the NHAEYC Professional Development Series “Faculty Symposium at Great Bay Community College.” The 6.5 hour workshop was a great opportunity to network with Early Childhood colleagues teaching at the high school, 2-year, and 4-year level. Plans were discussed to continue this series of professional development for Early Childhood faculty, with the potential of holding future meetings at campuses throughout the state.
  • Clarissa Uttley was awarded a Faculty Research and Development Award from PSU to develop a measure assessing the use of animals in Early Childhood classrooms throughout the U.S.
  • Marcel Lebrun on January 22nd facilitated a full day workshop with Kennett Middle School’s educational teams (Conway School District) doing a school-wide evaluation of positive behavior approaches, Function Based training, School climate and culture, and guiding teams through a self reflection and analysis of their systems within a true Middle School context and to evaluate the efficiency of these structural procedures and make recommendations for future planning and improvement.

Environmental Science and Policy

  • Research Assistant Professor Lisa Doner chaired the session: “Floodplains, Estuarine and Coastal Environments II” and was a contributing author on three papers presented at the 11th International Paleolimnology Symposium, in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, 14-19 December.
  • Mary Ann McGarry submitted a grant proposal, with Lisa Doner and Trish Lindberg, for approximately $35,000 to EPA for Green GRASS (an integrated arts and science professional initiative focused on sustainability, involving K-12 teachers and students and a minimum of 8 PSU faculty, staff and students). Preparing second grant proposal for submission on 2/1/2010 to the Wellborn Ecology Fund to bring Green GRASS to still more teachers.
  • Mary Ann McGarry and Warren Tomkiewicz prepared a grant proposal for Wally Stevens to submit on behalf of the Global Aquaculture Alliance for a Responsible Aquaculture Education Initiative.
  • Mary Ann McGarry hosted the fifth exchange of professionals from the Archangelsk region of Russia, through the Portland, ME Sister City Program, at PSU. This effort was funded by the Open World Forum of the US Library of Congress and involved approximately 25 faculty, staff, and PSU partners from the surrounding community.
  • Mark Turski is working in conjunction with Its About Time publishing, Concord HS biology teacher Lise Bofinger, and Linwood Biology teacher David Webster on the review of the NSF funded BioComm curriculum.

Health and Human Performance

  • Cheryl Coker was elected as Chair-Elect of the Motor Development and Learning Research Academy of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).
  • Linda Levy, Liesl Lindley, Margie King and 16 athletic training undergraduate and graduate students attended the 2010 Eastern Athletic Trainers’ Association (EATA) Conference. Nora Beltz (MS ‘10) placed 2nd in the EATA District I Quiz Bowl earning her the opportunity to represent Plymouth State and District I in the national Quiz Bowl at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Annual Meeting and Symposium in June.
  • Linda Levy and Jackie Hall (BS ’10) served as athletic trainers for the ETC production of Godspell.
  • Barbara McCahan, in collaboration with Dan O’Neill MD, presented a weekend community education workshop entitled “Introduction to Core Strengthening” sponsored by The Frost School and the Center for Active Living and Healthy Communities (HHP).

Lamson Learning Commons

  • David A. Beronä: A Korean edition of Wordless Books by David Berona was published in Seoul, South Korea.
  • Elaine S. Allard: New England School Library Association (within American Library Association Midwinter Meeting), “Knowledge/Learning Commons: The Future School Library?” Boston, MA January 15, 2010.
  • Anne Lebreche and Jennifer Green: More than 50 8th graders from Plymouth Elementary School visited the Lamson Library and Learning Commons for a day of instruction and exploration. Students received a short demonstration of library resources, a building tour, and an afternoon of independent research on a topic in early U.S. Colonial history. The 8th grade student visit began last year as a community outreach effort aimed at increasing students’ awareness of the value of library resources.
  • Ellen M. Murphy: A month filled with workshops on instructional technologies and their application within the classroom was coordinated for faculty and PAT’s by Ellen M. Murphy, Coordinator of Online Education, along with her staff, Terri Lessard and Justin L’Italien. There were 35 workshops presented throughout the month of January for the January Jamboree.

Languages and Linguistics

  • James Whiting, who serves as the New Hampshire state representative on the Executive Board of Northern New England TESOL, coordinated NNETESOL’s annual conference on November 14th, which brought almost 200 attendees to campus from across New England. At the conference, Whiting and College of Graduate Studies TESOL MEd student, D. Joan Bishop, presented findings from on-going research on implementing a program for incarcerated English language learners at the Concord Correctional facility.

Music, Theatre and Dance

  • Dan Perkins, with colleagues Kathleen Arecchi, Barbara Lopez-Mayhew, and Lisa Ladd, completed a three-week performance and cultural immersion project in Italy with the PSU Chamber Singers and additional students in the Italian LL1020 course.
  • At the Integrated Arts Conference, Saturday, January 30, Elizabeth Cox presented “The Ringmaster and Introducing Action,” which explored how the relationship between director and actor is formed, and introduced elements to encourage freedom of movement into action.
  • As Eastern Division MTNA Certification Commissioner, Carleen Graff presented a workshop on the new MTNA Certification Profile Projects to the NH Seacoast Chapter on January 8. She was an adjudicator for the MTNA Eastern Division Piano Competitions held in Ithaca, New York on January 9. The winners of the Division will now compete at the national finals in Albuquerque in March. Dr. Graff also gave a series of three master classes in the Goodwin Piano Studio in Dover on January 16. In addition, she has had Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto for piano solo and digital keyboard orchestra published by Ogilvy Music in Denton TX.
  • Rik Pfenninger directed the New Hampshire All State Saxophone quartet in January. Rik also licensed 3 of his orchestral compositions to Prolific Arts music in Denton, Texas and completed scoring the movie “My Secret Season” directed by Andrew Kramp and released through FairSky films in New York.

Social Science

  • Faculty and students from the Geography major were recently presented with a number of honors at the annual meeting of the New England-St. Lawrence Valley Geographical (NESTVAL). Bryon Middlekauff, advisor to the student World Geography Bowl team, must have felt on top of the world when his team won the championship – senior Geography major Kyle McGonagle, senior Geography major Marie Callahan, junior Environmental Planning major Jesse Robillard, junior Environmental Science and Policy major Courtney Webb, and junior Anthropology/Sociology major Heidi Van Curen. Not only that, two of his students took the 1st and 2nd place MVP awards –Kyle McGonagle (1st) and Marie Callahan (2nd). PSU has a history of doing well in this competition, and this team outdid themselves. Bryon was also elected to serve as NESTVAL’s Regional Councilor and will represent the New England states and eastern Canada on the Association of American Geographers’ Executive Committee for the next three years. Congratulations to everyone.
  • Also at the NESTVAL meeting, Mark Okrant presented a paper on the work that he, Thad Guldbrandsen (Center for Rural Partnerships) and Ben Amsden (CRP) have done – and then was presented with the 2009 NESTVAL Award for Lifetime Contributions to Geography!
  • David Starbuck (Anthropology and Sociology) delivered a paper entitled “British Military Artifacts of the French and Indian War” to the Annual Meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology on January 8 in Amelia Island (Jacksonville), Florida. David also spoke to the Glens Falls Rotary Club on “The Archaeology of the French and Indian War” on January 28 in Glens Falls, New York.
  • Bob Heiner published a review of the new edition of Gresham Sykes’ 1958 classic The Society of Captives: A Study of a Maximum Security Prison in the December issue of Federal Probation: A Journal of Correctional Philosophy and Practice. Those who are interested can find the review at http://www.uscourts.gov/fedprob/December_2009/bookshelf.html.

Social Work

  • Stephen Gorin and Cynthia Moniz attended a special briefing in December on health care reform with Andrew Sperling, national lobbyist for the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI).
  • Scott Meyer conducted a training workshop for the Social Work Practicum field instructors in January.
  • Cynthia Moniz continued her work as a member of CSWE’s Council on Leadership Development. Applications (20) were screened and rated by all council members to select recipients of CSWE’s first Harvard Summer Institute Scholarship focusing on leadership in social work education.
  • Christine Rine attended a meeting of the DCYF Bureau of Organizational Learning Advisory Council(BOLAC) in January. The purpose of the newly formed BOLAC is to guide the development of an integrated system of learning within the child welfare system in New Hampshire. BOLAC will support the coordination and maximization of training resources.

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