Greeting Children

All children and families should be greeted upon their arrival and acknowledged when they leave. Each classroom staff will decide how this will be handled. A friendly greeting and a welcoming smile can make a big difference in a child and parent’s day. At no time should a child and family arrive without someone acknowledging their presence. Staff members, including  students, should make an effort to help the child become engaged in the classroom routine before the parent leaves.

Families may have important information about a child’s day.  Please explain to them that you are only there for a short period of time and redirect them to the classroom teacher for sharing of important information.

At times, families may wish to have an in-depth discussion regarding their child during arrival and departure. Please be mindful that your primary responsibility at this time is to be with the children. Be sure that you are watching the children while talking with families and try to keep your conversation brief.

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