Learning, Leadership, and Community (Ed.D.)

Learning, Leadership, and Community (Ed.D.)
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Innovate. Investigate. Inspire. 


Plymouth State’s Doctor of Education (EdD) programs create an environment for students to engage in collaborative inquiry, focused scholarship, and applied research. Our EdD programs are oriented to the improvement of professional practice by extending the knowledge, expertise, and skill of candidates through the application of research to leadership issues. Experienced practitioners and professionals, including teachers, administrators, counselors, and individuals in higher education, related community agencies, and organizations, will be prepared to become system leaders and agents of change in their communities and will be ready to advance in their professional careers.

PSU is accredited by the New England Commission on Higher Education (NECHE) and formed the first EdD cohort 2009, and is also a member of the nationally recognized Carnegie Program on Education (CPED). 

This is a practitioner based program meant for individuals who are looking to transform their organization, and themselves through personal development and action based research. This program will enable you to develop partnerships and connections for internal and external stakeholders so your dissertation can impact change on multiple levels.

Carnegie Program on the Education Doctorate (CPED)

PSU is a member of the Carnegie Program on the Education Doctorate (CPED). This is a prestigious nationally recognized organization, which works with higher education institutions to develop and redesign Doctor of Education Programs. The mission of the CPED Framework is to develop a professional doctorate in education that prepares educators for the application of appropriate and specific practices, the generation of new knowledge and the stewardship of the profession.

Six Guiding Principles for Program Design: The Professional Doctorate in Leadership, Learning and Community
  1. Is framed around questions of equity, ethics, and social justice to bring about solutions to complex problems of practice.
  2. Prepares leaders who can construct and apply knowledge to make positive difference in the lives of individuals, families, organization, and communities.
  3. Provides opportunities for candidates to develop and demonstrate collaboration and communication skills to work with diverse communities and to build partnerships. 
  4. Provides field based opportunities to analyze problems of practice and use multiple frames to develop meaningful solutions.
  5. Is grounded in an develops a professional knowledge base that integrates both practical and research knowledge, that links theory with systemic and systematic inquiry.
  6. Emphasizes the generation, transformation and use of professional knowledge and practice.
Program Design Concepts

There are six program design concepts that are an integral part of the doctorate program:

  1. Signature Pedagogy is the pervasive set of practices used to prepare scholarly practitioners to think, to perform, and to act with integrity. It challenges assumptions, engages in action, and requires ongoing assessments and accountability.
  2. Laboratories of Practice are settings where theory and practice inform and enrich each other. They address complex problems of practice where ideas formed by intersection of theory, inquiry, and practice can be implemented, measured, and analyzed for the impact made.
  3. Problem of Practice is as a persistent, contextualized, and specific issue embedded in the work of a professional practitioner, the addressing of which the potential to result in has improved understanding, experience, and outcomes.
  4. Scholarly Practitioners blend practical wisdom with professional skills and knowledge to name, frame, and solve problems of practice. The use practical research and applied theories as tools for change.
  5. Inquiry as Practice is the process of posing significant questions that focus on complex problems of practice and the ability to gather, organize, judge, aggregate, and analyze situations, literature, and data with a critical lens.
  6. Dissertation in Practice is a scholarly endeavor that affects a complex problem of practice.

Three Pathways for Completion

PSU's doctoral program is a total of 60 credits, of which 27 credits are post-master's specialization courses. Once a minimum of 15 credits in the specialization component are complete students are eligible to participate in the cohort interview process. Successful completion of the interview process will move qualified candidates into a cohort which begins in the summer semester of each year. Once assigned to a cohort, students will complete the eight doctoral core classes along with any remaining specialization courses and a minimum of 9 credits of dissertation work. It is expected students will complete the 60 credit doctoral program within four years. The total time to complete may not exceed five years. 

Pathway 1 (completed at least 27 credits of post-master's coursework)

  • Complete eight doctoral core classes throughout the year within the three-year time frame by taking one or two courses during each semester on campus, in sequence, starting in the summer and ending two summers later. More information on the course schedule model can be found at https://www.plymouth.edu/education/program/edd/learning-leadership-community.
  • Core courses are offered in an intensive or hybrid format, with pre-and post-course assignments required.
  • Transfer in up to 27 credits of CAGS or equivalent post-master’s work so your specialization courses are complete before enrolling.
  • Students must have
    • Earned a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies (CAGS) in education or a related field, a degree equivalent to a CAGS, or a minimum of 27 post-master’s credits from coursework (7000 level or higher) related to a specific field of study.
    • Practicum, internships, and capstones will not be included in the 27 credits of post-master’s coursework.
    • At least five years of successful experience in their chosen field
    • Be available for intensive weekend courses throughout the three years to complete the doctoral core requirements.
    • Specialization courses must have the approval of the doctoral program coordinator and be at the 7000 level or equivalent.
    • Courses must be completed within four years of admission to the doctoral program.

Pathway 2 (completed at least 15 credits of post-master's coursework)

  • Complete eight doctoral core courses on campus over a three year time-frame while completing the specialization courses during the fall and spring semesters. More information on the course schedule model can be found at https://www.plymouth.edu/education/program/edd/learning-leadership-community
  • Core courses are offered in an intensive or hybrid format, with pre-and post-course assignments required.
  • Students must have:
    • completed at least 15 credits of post-master’s level courses (7000 level or equivalent) as part of the specialization component
    • complete the remaining 12 credits of specialization courses during the first two years, along with the EdD core classes
    • at least five years successful experience in their chosen field
    • be available for intensive weekend courses throughout the three years to complete the doctoral core requirements.

Pathway 3 (must have earned a master's degree)

  • Complete eight doctoral core courses and specialization courses over a four-year period while completing the specialization courses during the fall, spring, and summer semesters.
  • Core and specialization courses are offered in an intensive or hybrid format, with pre- and post-course assignments required. 
  • Students must have:
    • Completed 15-18 credit's of post-master's level courses (7000 level or equivalent) as part of the specialization component before being invited to interview for a place in a cohort which begins in the summer of each year. 
    • Complete the remaining 9-12 credits of specialization courses during the next two years, along with the EdD core classes once assigned to a cohort.
    • at least five years successful experience in their chosen field
    • be available for intensive weekend courses throughout the four years to complete the doctoral core requirements.

Students are required to complete the following core courses: ( Schedule changes indicated below)

Core Course:  Total Credits =15 

  • EP 7020 Collaborative Leadership (Fall )
  • EP 7404 Quantitative Research for Professionals (Fall )
  • EP 7400 Conducting a Qualitative Study (Spring)
  • EP 7080 Ethical Leadership and Decision Making (Springs) 
  • EP 7060 Legal Issues and Policy Making  ( Spring)

Specific requirements and program of study will be available for students from multiple disciplines for the 12 electives required for the pre-doctoral credits. Students will choose remaining courses for 12 credits from approved list of Doctor of Education electives in consultation with the director of the program Dr. Marcel Lebrun mrlebrun@plymouth.edu

Doctor of Education Learning Outcomes

  • Enhance the leadership capacity of professionals through the expansion of knowledge and the refinement of skills;
  • Foster inquiry and reflective practice through course content, learning, leadership, pedagogy, social theory and research;
  • Develop participants’ knowledge and expertise through research addressing current and best practices;
  • Encourage creative scholarship, reflection, and inquiry;
  • Examine global and local issues of diversity and their impact in organizations as well as the larger society;
  • Prepare participants to be system leaders and agents of change in their communities;
  • Support and advance the application of knowledge and research that contributes to innovation and transformation in a variety of local, regional, national and international settings.

Continuous Enrollment 

Students in the Doctor of Education must be continuously enrolled in classes and/or dissertation research throughout their program. If student fails to contact the Director of the EdD program to inform them of a potential Leave of Absence (LOA), this will be grounds for dismissal from the program. Students not enrolled by the end of the add/drop period of that particular term will be contacted by the Director and given an extension of 7 days to register or be withdrawn from the program.

Continuous Enrollment in Dissertation Phase

Doctoral candidates must remain continuously enrolled during the dissertation phase of the program. Students must register for EP 8800, Dissertation Research, (3 credits per term) until the degree is conferred. Failure to register during each academic term will result in termination of the candidacy.

Doctoral candidates who are international students enrolled in EP 8800, Dissertation Research (a three credit course), may be considered full-time for immigration purposes.  International students should consult with a representative of the Global Engagement Office to determine if they qualify for this exception.  International students do not qualify for an LOA.

Leave of Absence During Coursework

In the event a student needs to take a Leave of Absence (LOA) during doctoral coursework (all 8000 courses), the student will be required to meet with the director of the program to establish what would be the best rentry point to the program if the student decides to return to the program.

The student will not be required to repeat the coursework already completed.  Students will not be charged tuition for the courses they have already successfully completed.  This will apply to all courses regardless of when the LOA is granted.

Withdrawal from the Program

Before withdrawing from the EdD program, the student should meet with the Program Director to understand their options for returning.   Students who have withdrawn will have to complete a full application to return to the program.  The new application will include letters of recommendation, updated and transcripts (if applicable), recent writing sample if original is more than three years old, and the full interview process.  The student must receive clearance from Program Director prior to February 1st of their intention to reapply for that year and must submit all application materials by March 1st.  The student must not have holds on their accounts.

If the student is accepted, they will have their previous credits evaluated for suitability and a plan for their return will be developed.  The plan will include which courses, if any, the student will be required audit.  Students auditing the course(s) will be required to register for audit* and will participate in all course work and discussions.   These audited courses will allow the student to join the next new cohort.  Accepted students will follow the program requirements in effect at the time of return.
*Tuition and fees may be charged.

Dispositions

In the event that a student demonstrates inappropriate behaviors (outbursts in the classroom, writes rude or threatening emails, harasses other students and/or faculty), this student will be referred to the Dean of Students at PSU.  Students are urged to review the Student Code of Behavior.  If just cause has been found after a thorough investigation, the student may be asked to withdraw from the Doctor of Education program.

Contact

Program Coordinator, Doctor of Education
Professor
Phone: (603) 535-2288
Office: Education, Democracy & Social Change, Hyde Hall Rm 224, MSC 23, Plymouth, NH 03264

Academic Operations Manager
Office: Education, Democracy & Social Change, Rounds Hall Rm 216, MSC 38, Plymouth, NH 03264

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Curriculum & Requirements

Curriculum Requirements

Course Title Credits
Doctoral Core Component
EP 8000Emerging Perspectives on Learning and Development3
EP 8011Critical Inquiry in Research3
EP 8012Research Design in Leadership, Learning and Community3
EP 8013Applications in Dissertation Research3
EP 8014Data Analysis in Dissertation Research3
EP 8026Writing a Literature Review3
EP 8030Diversity, Ethics, and Social Justice3
EP 8820Entrepreneurial Externship3
Concentration or Specialization
Complete 27 credits 127
CAGS Core
EP 7020
Collaborative Leadership
EP 7030
Transforming the Educational Agenda
EP 7040
Planning in Education and Human Services
EP 7050
Advanced Mixed Research Methodology
EP 7060
Legal Issues in Policy Making
EP 7080
Ethical Leadership and Decision Making
EP 7400
Conducting a Qualitative Study
EP 7404
Quantitative Methods for Professions
Superintendent Educational Leadership Program
EP 7100
School Labor Relations, Negotiations and Personnel Management
EP 7200
School Buildings and Transportation
EP 7300
The Superintendency and School District Leadership
General Electives
EP 7090
Critical Perspectives for Arts Advocacy
EP 7110
Arts and Learning
EP 7121
Designing & Leading Healthy Organizations
EP 7130
Shaping Policies and Practices in Arts Education
EP 7210
Leading Curriculum and Instruction to Transform Schools
EP 7215
Leaders as Professional Developers
EP 7400
Conducting a Qualitative Study
Higher Education Curriculum, Instruction and Administrative Leadership
HD 7000
Foundations of Higher Education
HD 7010
Legal and Ethical Issues in Higher Education
HD 7015
Special Topics
HD 7020
Collaboration in Higher Education
HD 7030
Higher Education Administration and Organizational Management
HD 7040
Emerging Trends in Higher Education
HD 7050
Coaching Innovative Leaders
HD 7060
Technology Integration for Educational Leaders
HD 7070
Teaching Post-secondary Learners
HD 7080
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
HD 7090
Teacher Transformation
Dissertation
EP 8800Dissertation Research (Repeatable)9
Total Credits60
1

Students select coursework based on their professional goals, certification needs, and interests. In some instances, career goals may require a degree program in excess of 60 credits; therefore, consultation with an academic advisor prior to taking courses is essential. Course selection must have the approval of the academic advisor and the doctoral program coordinator.

The concentration or specialization component can be fulfilled with courses taken for the student’s Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies (CAGS) or equivalent program. For example, students may apply courses from any of the Plymouth State University CAGS program options.

Admission Information

Admission to the doctoral program is competitive and open to individuals who possess a master’s degree and at least five years of successful experience in their chosen field along with demonstrated evidence of, or potential for, professional leadership.

Requirements

Admissions requirements for the Doctor of Education programs require the following materials to be submitted through our online application.

Minimum GPA of 3.0 or better

The admissions review team will consider academic history for bachelor’s, master’s and post-master’s coursework.

Official transcripts from all college level coursework

Official transcripts verifying conferral of bachelor’s and other graduate degrees from an accredited institution, along with official transcripts from any/all other colleges and universities attended. Transcripts can be sent electronically to psu-gradadmit@plymouth.edu or mailed to PSU Graduate Admissions, 17 High Street-MSC 52, Plymouth, NH 03264

Three professional recommendations

Professional recommendations must:

  • directly address applicant’s candidacy for admission to the doctoral program;
  • include a detailed explanation of applicant’s strengths and ability to do research; and
  • address applicant’s potential to successfully participate in, and complete, a doctoral program.
current resume

Resumes can be uploaded directly to your online application.

Professional Writing Sample

Applicants may create a writing sample or use a previously created work that has been submitted academically or written for professional reasons. Writing sample must:

  • be written within the last two years
  • be original and individually written (group projects or papers will not be accepted)
  • be clear and well organized with logical progression of ideas;
  • include multiple supporting details (literature) with sources cited correctly within the narrative;
  • indicate mastery of grammar, usage & mechanics; and
  • reveal evidence of appropriate use of APA format.
Statement of interest

The statement of interest/intent must:

  • indicate your reasons for applying to the doctoral program;
  • describe your preparation and/or readiness for commencing doctoral level coursework; and
  • explain why our program is a good fit.
NH Residency Verification Form (NH residents only)

Residents of NH must complete the NH Residency Verification form as part of the application process to receive the in-state tuition rate.


Acceptance to the Summer Cohort - Doctoral Core & Dissertation

Ed.D. Interview Process and Requirements

  1. In March of each year, the Ed.D. program director will invite doctoral  students who have met the minimum of 15 post-master’s credits to participate in the interview process for the upcoming summer cohort. 
  2. There will be a 30 minute individual interview with 4-5 faculty at which time students will be asked to present their Problem of Practice that aligns with their research and dissertation interests. (Please review guidelines for Problem of Practice development in preparation for the on campus interview.)
  3. There will also be a group interview which will occur shortly after the individual interviews, where students will be evaluated by doctoral faculty.
  4. Doctoral students will receive notice of their acceptance or denial into the upcoming cohort by the middle of April. 
  5. Starting in the third week of May the first two Ed.D. courses will begin with online pre-assignments and readings.
  6. Starting on or around July 1, the face to face intensive classes will begin on campus from 9am-4pm for a period of two weeks. On campus classes will end in the third week of July with ongoing assignments till the second week of August at which time classes will end for the summer. Dates/schedule subject to change.
  7. Fall/Spring classes be offered as Saturday intensive classes from 9am-4pm throughout the year. Dates/schedule subject to change.

Deadlines

Applications are accepted for the fall, spring, and summer semesters. All materials must be submitted by the stated deadlines below. As part of the application review, students will be advised to follow one of the three pathways to complete the program based on the number of post-master’s credits earned at the time of admission. The program coordinator will work closely with students and invite those who are ready to move into the doctoral phase to interview for next available summer cohort. 

  • Fall 2023 – Apply by August 1, 2023
  • Spring 2024 – Apply by December 1, 2023
  • Summer 2024 Cohort – Apply by March 1, 2024
  • Summer 2024 – Apply by April 15, 2024

2023-24 Estimated Graduate Per Credit Tuition and Mandatory Fees

  New Hampshire Resident
Tuition Mandatory Fees Per Credit Total
Master’s Degrees/Certificates $570 $42 $612
CAGS $610 $42 $652
EDD $665 $42 $707
  Out-of-State Resident
Tuition Mandatory Fees Per Credit Total
Master’s Degrees/Certificates $789 $42 $831
CAGS $763 $42 $805
EDD $845 $42 $887

More information is available through the Student Financial Services Office

Graduate students are eligible for financial aid in the form of student loans only. You will need to complete the FAFSA at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester you wish to begin taking classes. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid – please review our international admission requirements to learn more.

More information can be found on the Student Financial Services website.

Each year, Plymouth State offers a limited number of merit-based scholarships to admitted graduate students. Selection criteria include academic and professional achievements, commitment to graduate study, and achievement or pursuit of personal or professional goals. Visit the PSU Scholarship Opportunities webpage for additional information.

Explore Program Details

  • Enhance the leadership capacity of professionals through the expansion of knowledge and the refinement of skills;
  • Foster inquiry and reflective practice through course content, learning, leadership, pedagogy, social theory and research;
  • Develop participants’ knowledge and expertise through research addressing current and best practices;
  • Encourage creative scholarship, reflection, and inquiry;
  • Examine global and local issues of diversity and their impact in organizations as well as the larger society;
  • Prepare participants to be system leaders and agents of change in their communities;
  • Support and advance the application of knowledge and research that contributes to innovation and transformation in a variety of local, regional, national and international settings.

Experienced practitioners and professionals, including teachers, administrators, counselors, and individuals in higher education, related community agencies, and organizations, will be prepared to become system leaders and agents of change in their communities and will be ready to advance in their professional careers.

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